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Bloomsburg 

State 
College 

Undergraduate 
Catalogue 



1979-1980 




Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://archive.org/details/blooms79bloo 



BLOOMSBURG STATE COLLEGE 




UNDERGRADUATE 
CATALOGUE 



1979-1980 

(prepared March 1, 1979) 



Contents 



Pennsylvania Department of Education 

College Calendar 

Board of Trustees 

Administration 

Faculty, 1979-80 10 

1. General Information 

2. Expenses, Fees and Refunds 

3. Student Life and Services 

4. Admission and Readmission 

5. Academic Policies and Practices 57 

6. Undergraduate Curricula: Introduction 67 

7. School of Arts and Sciences 

8. School of Business 157 

9. School of Professional Studies 169 

10. School of Extended Programs 205 

11. Graduate Studies 209 

Index 210 



"Bloomsburg State College is committed to providing leadership in taking affirmative action 
to attain equal educational and employment rights foi all persons, without regard to 
handicap, oi other legally protected classification. I his polk} is placed in this document m 
accordance with itate and federal laws including rule l\ of the Educational Amendments 

Ol 1972 and Section 5W ol the Rehabilitation Act ot 1973 Please direct equal opportunil> 

inquiries to 

\K Deborah Ellis, Carver Hall. M 



Dl l'\K I Ml \ I 01 1 Dl < \ I ION 3 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



Commonwealth of Pennsylvania 

Robert G. Scanlon, Secretary of Education 

Chairperson, Board of State College Presidents 

Ex- Officio Member, Board of Trustees 

Warren E. Ringler, Commissioner for Higher Education 



BOARD OF STATE COLLEGE AND 
UNIVERSITY DIRECTORS 

(as of March, 1979) 

Patricia M. Coghlan, Chairperson — Beaver Falls 

Laurence Fenninger, Jr. — Riegelsville 

Rebecca F. Gross — Lock Haven 

Jo Hays — State College 

Peter A. McGrath — Malvern 

Roberta J. Marsh — Stroudsburg 

P.D. Mitchell — Williamsport 

Irving O. Murphy — Erie 

Frederick A. Reddig — Shippensburg 

Ralph J. Roberts — Bala Cynwyd 

Bernard F. Scherer — Greensburg 

Beverly Schiffrin — Gladwyne 

Harry E. Seyler — York 

John B. Veltri — Pittsburgh 

Stephen L. Yale — Philadelphia 



4 HT4-SM COI I K.I ( VI I M>\K 



BLOOMSBIRG STATE COLLEGE 

APPROVED COLLEGE CALENDAR 

FOR 

1979-80 



SEMESTER I 

Registration 

Classes Begin 

No Classes 

Thanksgiving Recess Begins 

Classes Resume 
Classes End 

Reading Day 

Final Exam Period Begins 

First Semester Ends 
Commencement 



(1979) 

Monday. August 27 

Tuesday, August 28 

Monday, September 3, Labor Day 

End of Classes on Wednesday 

November 21 
Monday, November 26, 8:00 a.m. 
End of Classes on Wednesday, 

December 12 
Thursday. December 13 
Friday, December 14, 8:00 a.m. 

(and includes Saturday. Dec. 15) 
Thursday, December 20 
Sundav, December 16 



MWF: 44 Class Hours - TTH: 45 Class Hours 



SEMESTER II 

Registration 
Classes Begin 
Spring Recess Begins 

Classes Resume 
Easter Recess Begins 

Classes Resume 
( lasses End 

Final Exam Period Begins 
Second Semester Ends 
Commencement 



(1980) 

Tuesday, January 8 
Wednesday, January 9, 8:00 a.m. 
End of Classes on Friday, 

February 22 
Monday, March 3. 8:00 a.m. 
End" of Classes on Wednesday, 

April 2 
Tuesday, April 8, 8:00 a.m. 
End of Classes on Frida\. 

Ma\ 2 
Monday, May 5 
Saturday, May 10 
Saturday, Ma\ 10 



MW I : 45 (lass Hours - TTH: 45 (lass Hours 



1980 Summer Sessions — May 27 through August 15 



1980-81 Cm in, i ( \i i\i)\k 5 



BLOOMSBURG STATE COLLEGE 

APPROVED COLLEGE CALENDAR 

FOR 

1980-81 



Semester I 



Registration 

Evening Classes Begin, 6:00 p.m. 

Regular Classes Begin 

No Classes 

Mid-Semester Break 

Classes Resume 

Thanksgiving Recess Begins 

Classes Resume 
Reading Day 
Final Exams Begin 
First Semester Ends 
Commencement 



(1980) 

Monday, August 25 

Monday, August 25 

Tuesday, August 26 

Monday, September 1 (Labor Day) 

Monday & Tuesday, October 13-14 

Wednesday, October 15, 8:00 a.m. 

Wednesday, November 26, 

12:00 noon 
Monday, December 1, 8:00 a.m. 
Saturday, December 13 
Monday, December 15 
Saturday, December 20 
Sunday, December 21 



MWF: 43 Vi Class Hours - TTH: 45 Class Hours 



Semester II 

Registration 
Classes Begin 
Spring Recess Begins 
Classes Resume 
Easter Recess Begins 

Classes Resume 
Reading Day 
Final Exams Begin 
Second Semester Ends 
Commencement 



(1981) 

Monday, January 12 
Tuesday, January 13 
Thursday, February 26, 8:00 a.m. 
Monday, March 9, 8:00 a.m. 
Thursday, April 16, 

End of Classes 
Monday, April 20, 12:00 noon 
Thursday, May 7 
Friday, May 8 
Friday, May 15 
Sunday, May 17 



MWF: 431/2 Class Hours - TTH: 45 Class Hours 



1981 Summer Sessions: June 1 through August 21 




Seated, left to right: Dr. James H. McCormick. Richard Walton. Mrs. Gaife) C. Keller. I)r 
Edwin Weishond. Standing: Frank M. Fay, Joseph Nespoli, Jettre> Hunsicker, Ke\in M 
O'Connor, John J. Kuheika. 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

Bloomsburg State College 

(as of February, 1979) 



Mr. Frank M. Fay 

Mr. Jcftery A. Hunsicker 

Mis Gailcy C. Keller 

Mr. John J. Kubeika 

Mr. Joseph M. Nespoli 

Mr. Kevin M. O'Connor 

Mr. Richard K. Walton, Vice Chairperson 

I )i Edwin Weisbond, Secretary 

Mr. William Zurick, Chairperson 



Ha/ let on 

Bloomsburg 

Bloomsburg 

St. daii 

Berwick 

Wilkes-Barre 

Berwick 

Mount Carmel 
Shamokin 



ADVISORS TO THE BOARD OF TRl SIFFS 



Mi Millard C. I udwig 

Mi Joseph J SurdovaJ 

Mi Wilham V \cicino 
Mr. Garj I . Roberts 



Alumni 

Students 

Facuh) 

Non-Instructional Staff 



Administration 7 






lames H. McCormick James V. Mitchell Boyd F. Buckingham Jerrold A. Griffis 

Administration 

(as of March 1, 1979) 

JAMES H. McCORMICK President 

B.S., Indiana University of Pennsylvania; M.Ed., Ed.D., University of Pitts- 
burgh. (1973) 

JAMES V. MITCHELL, JR. Vice President for Academic Affairs 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of Chicago. (1977) 

JERROLD A. GRIFFIS Vice President for Student Life 

B.S., West Chester State College; M.Ed., Ohio University; D.Ed., The Pennsyl- 
vania State University. (1971) 

BOYD F. BUCKINGHAM Vice President for Administration 

B.S., Bloomsburg State College; M.S., Bucknell University. (1953) 

JOHN H. ABELL Director of Housing 

B.A., M.Ed., St. Lawrence University. (1973) 

ROBERT L. BUNGE Registrar 

B.S., Bloomsburg State College; M.S., Bucknell University. (1964) 

CHARLES H. CARLSON Dean, School of Graduate Studies 

B.A., San Jose State College; M.A., Ed.D., Teachers College, Columbia 
University. (1959) 

JENNIE H. CARPENTER Assistant Dean of Student Life 

B.A., University of Oklahoma; M.A., University of Alabama. (1968) 

SARAH COBRAIN Assistant Dean of Student Life 

B.A., Dickinson College; M.A., Bowling Green State University. (1976) 

T. L. COOPER Dean of Admissions and Records 

A.B., Morehead State University; M.Ed., The Pennsylvania State University. 
(1970) 

THOMAS A. DAVIES, JR. Director of Career Development and Placement 

B.A., Waynesburg College; M.Ed., Duquesne University. (1964) 

FRANK S. DAVIS, JR. Assistant Vice President for Administration 

B.S., M.Ed., Shippensburg State College; Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh. 
(1966) 

Jo ANNE B. DAY Assistant Director of Career Development and Placement 

B.A., M.Ed., Western Maryland College. (1976) 



Date in parenthesis is date of appointment 



MINISTRATION 

JOS1 I'M \ DeMEl Fl iisistmu Dean of Student Ufe 

B S . M S . Delta Stale University. (1976) 

DOYl I (i DODSON Director of the Computer Services Center 

B S M 1 d . Bloomsburg State College. (1967) 

I l)so\ I DRAKJ 

B.A.. University ot Notre Dame M \. Ph.D., Georgetoun University. (1964) 
On leave during 1978-79 academic \ear. 

( STUART El AV \ R DS Dean, School of Professional Studies 

B S . Bloomsburg State College; M.Ed., D.Ed., The Pennsylvania 
University. (1958) 

1)1 BORAH A. ELLIS Affirmative Action Desegregation Officer 

and Title IX Coordinator 
B.S., Bowling Green University; M.S., Indiana State University. (1976) 

G. ALFRED FORSYTH Dean. School of Arts and Sciences 

B.A., Dickinson College; M.S.. North Carolina State University; Ph.D., Purdue 
University. (1978) 

ANNE L. FRENCH Admissions Counselor 

B.S., Bloomsburg State College. (1977) 

CAROL A. GILLERAN Assistant Director of Financial Aid 

B.S., M.Ed., Indiana University of Pennsylvania. (1978) 

RICHARD B. HAUPT Assistant Dean of Student Life 

B.S., M.Ed., Shippensburg State College. (1968) 

KENNETH C. HOFFMAN Special Assistant for College Relations 

B.A., The Pennsylvania State University. (1970) 

ELTON HUNSINGER Administrator for Grants and Federal Relations 

B.S., East Stroudsburg State College; M.A., Bucknell University. (1961) 

GEORGE H. KIRLIN Assistant Dean of Student Ufe 

B.S., M.Ed., Kutztown State College. (1977) 

PHILLIP H. K.RAUSE Executive Assistant to the Vice President for 

Academic Affairs 
B.A., M.Ed., The Pennsylvania State University. (1972) 

THOMAS LYONS Director of Financial Aid 

B.S., Susquehanna University; M.A., Indiana University of PennsvKania. 
(1976) 

HUGH J. McFADDEN, JR. Director of Institutional Research 

B s , M.S., West Chester State College; Bd.D., I ehigh University (1976) 

MARII V\ Mil HI HOF, C.P.S. Secretary to the President 

JOHN S \l! I K\ Director of' Student Activities and the College Union 

MS. Bloomsburg State College; M.Ed.. Ohio University; D.Ed., The Penr 
vania State University. 1 1968) 

MAI Rl IN I Mil I KJAN Assistant Dean of Student Ufe 

B.A.. Wheeling College (1977) 

EDWARD W. NARD1 Assistant Dean of Student 

B.S., State Universit) Of New York at New Pali/. MS. Indiana State 

University. (1976) 

ROBER1 G. NOR ION Dean of Student Lite 

B.S., Slippery Rock State College; Mid. lni\ersit> of Pittsburgh. (1962) 



Administration 9 

THADDEUS PIOTROWSKI Director, Learning Resources Center 

B.S., California State College; M.Ed., The Pennsylvania State University. 
(1960) 

EMORY W. RARIG, JR. Dean, School of Business 

B.S., Bloomsburg State College; M.A., Ed.D., Teachers College, Columbia 
University. (1968) 

WILLIAM V. RYAN Director of Library Services 

A.B., John Carroll University; M.A., M.S.L.S., Case-Western Reserve; M.A., 
University of Notre Dame. (1973) 

KENNETH D. SCHNURE Assistant Registrar 

B.S., Bloomsburg State College; M.S., Bucknell University. (1970) 

JOHN J. TRATHEN Assistant Director of Student Activities 

and the College Union 
B.S., M.Ed., Bloomsburg State College. (1968) 

BERNARD J. VINOVRSKI Assistant Director of Admissions 

B.S., M.S., Wilkes College (1978) 

JOHN L. WALKER Executive Assistant to the President 

B.B.A., M.S., Westminster College. (1965) 

DONALD A. WATTS Director of Alumni Affairs 

B.S., Bloomsburg State College; M.S., Bucknell University. (1978) 

WILLIAM G. WILLIAMS Special Advisor to the President 

A.B., Gettysburg College, J.D., Dickinson School of Law. (1971) 

RICHARD O. WOLFE Dean of Extended Programs 

B.S., Bloomsburg State College; M.Ed., Rutgers University; Ed.D., University 
of Pennsylvania. (1967) 

LINDA A. ZYLA Assistant Dean of Student Life 

B.S., M.Ed., Bloomsburg State College. (1976) 




John L. Walker 



Lee C. Hopple 






William G. Williams 



Deborah A. Ellis 



Elton Hunsinger 



?BB 



(i Alfred forswh 



Emor) W. Rang, Jr. 



C. Stuan Hdwards 





Richard O. Wolfe 



Charles H. Carlson 



Faculty 



(as of March 1, 1979) 

WILLIAM A. ACIERNO, Associate Professor Speech Communication 

and Theatre 
B.A., University of Pittsburgh; M.F.A., Carnegie Institute of Technology. 

(1956) 

BRUCE E. ADAMS, Professor Geography and Earth St 

B.S., Lock Haven State College; M.Ed., D.Ed.. The Pennsylvania State 
University. (1956) 

H. M. AFSHAR, Professor Educational Studies and Se r 

B.A., University of Teheran; M.Ed., Ed.D University of Florida. ( 1966) 

RICHARD D. ALDERFER, Associate Professor Speech Communication 

and Theatre 
B.A., Bluffton College; M.Ed., Temple University; Ph.D., Ohio Univt 
(1967) 

BEN C. ALTER, Assistant Professor Foreign Langh 

B.A., Susquehanna University; M.Ed., University o\ Maine. (1964) 

M. DALE ANDERSON, Associate Professor dish 

B S I . Nebraska Christian College; M.A., Fort Havs Kansas State College. 
(1965) 

RICHARD G. ANDERSON, Associate Professor History 

B.A., Western Kentucky State College. \1 \ . Ph.D.. Texas Christian 
University. (1968) 

waym P VNDERSON, Associate Professor misuy 

A.A.S., Jamestown Community College; B.A., Harpur College; M.S.. Ph.D., 
Universit) of Illinois. (1975) 

HI VI \\ll\ s \\I>RI \\S. Associate Professor Communication Disorders 

R S . Universit) ot Virginia; M A, State Universit) of Iowa. (1! 



Faculty I i 

CHRISTOPHER F. ARMSTRONG, Associate Professor Sociology and 

Social Welfare 

B.A., Washington & Lee University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania. 
(1974) 

JOAN M. AUTEN, Associate Professor Health, Physical Education 

and Athletics 
B.S., West Chester State College; M.Ed., East Stroudsburg State College. 
(1968) 

RAYMOND E. BABINEAU, Professor Secondary Education 

B.A., M.A., Montclair State College; Ed.D., Temple University. (1969) 

HAROLD J. BAILEY, Professor Mathematics 

B.S., Albright College; M.Ed., Ph.D., The Pennsylvania State University. 
(1969) 

WILLIAM M. BAILLIE, Associate Professor Assistant Chairperson, English 

B.A., Ball State Teachers College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Chicago. (1974) 

JOHN S. BAIRD, JR., Associate Professor Chairperson, Psychology 

B.A., University of Virginia; M.S., Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
(1971) 

J. WESTON BAKER, Associate Professor Business Administration 

B.S., University of California at Berkeley; M.B.A., M.A., Washington State 
University. (1969) 

DONALD R. BASHORE, Associate Professor Psychology 

B.A., Susquehanna University; M.Ed., The Pennsylvania State University. 
(1960) 

UJAGAR S. BAWA, Professor Economics 

B.A., M.A., Punjab University; A.M., University of Pennsylvania; Ph.D., 
Cornell University. (1970) 

CHARLES M. BAYLER, Associate Professor Business Administration 

B.S., S.isquehanna University; M.S.B.A., C.P.A., Bucknell University. (1965) 

KARL A. BEAMER, Assistant Professor Art 

B.S., Kutztown State College; M.F.A., The Pennsylvania State University. 
(1972) 

STEPHEN D. BECK, Professor Chairperson, Mathematics 

B.S., Tufts University; M.S., Iowa State University; Ph.D., Rensselaer 
Polytechnic Institute. (1971) 

BARBARA E. BEHR, Associate Professor Business Administration 

A.B., Cornell University; LL.B., Rutgers-The State University; M.A., Hunter 
College. (1977) 

HENRIETTA C. BEHRENS, Associate Professor Elementary and Early 

Childhood Education 
B.S., Glassboro State College; M.S., Ed.D., University of Pennsylvania. (1973) 

BARRETT W. BENSON, Professor Chemistry 

A.B., Middlebury College; Ph.D., University of Vermont. (1967) 



12 \ \« ' in 

1 RED1 RICK I BI1 Kl V. Associate Professor Bum new Admimsr 

Bs. lock Haven State College; M.S., I he Pennsylvania State I nr. 
(1976) 

PETER H. BOH1 l\(.. Assistant Professor Economics 

B \. Miami University; M.A., The University of Iowa; Ph.D.. I'mver 
Massachusetts (1978) 

RODRICK CLARK BOLER, Associate Professor Health. Physical 

Education, and Athletics 
B.S.. M.A., University of Alabama. (1968) 

RUTH WM BOND, Instructor Director. Upward Bound Program 

B.A., Weaton College; M.A., Montclair State College. (1977) 

GEORGE P. BOSS, Assistant Professor Speech Communication 

and Theatre 
A. A., Pensacola Junior College; B.A., University of West Florida. M X 
Ph.D., Ohio University. (1976) 

PATRICIA M. BOYNE, Assistant Professor Business Administration 

B.A., Ladycliff College; M.S., The Pennsylvania State University. (1976) 

DUANE D. BRAUN, Assistant Professor Geography and Earth S 

B.S., State University of New York at Fredonia; M.A., Ph.D.. Johns Hopkins 
University. (1975) 

CHARLES M. BRENNAN, Professor Mathematics 

B.S., Ed., Bloomsburg State College; M.A., Montclair State College; Ph.D., 
The Pennsylvania State University. (1966) 

STEPHEN M. BRESETT, Professor Health. Physical Education 

and Athletics 
B.S., P.E.D., Springfield College; M.Ed., Rutgers University. (1969) 

RICHARD J. BROOK, Professor Philosophy and Anthropology 

B.A., Antioch College; M.A., Columbia University; Ph.D.. New School. NYC. 
(1967) 

LEROY H. BROWN, Associate Professor Mathematics 

B.S., Lock Haven State College; M.Ed., The Pennsvlvania State Universitv 
(1965) 

JESSE A. BRYAN, Associate Professor Director of the Center for 

A cademic Development 
A.B., Johnson C. Smith Universitv; M.Ed., Temple Universitv. Ph.D.. Toledo 
University. (1973) 

DONA! DA. CAMPLESE, Associate Professor >iolog\ 

M.A., Ed.D., West Virginia University. (1972) 

K M 1 CAMPLESE, Assistant ProfeMOf Counselor 

A.B., M.A.. West Virginia University. (1969) 

\l I AN I). CAR! V. Professor Business Administration 

A. A.. Scotttblufl Junior College; B.S., M.B.A.. Denver University; Ph.D., 
Universitv of lexas at Austin ( 1978) 

MARY] CARL, Assistant Professor Nursing 

R \ . Franklin Square Hospital. B.S . West Chester State College; M.S.. 
University of Maryland (1976) 



I M I'LTY/ 13 

WILLIAM L. CARLOUGH, Professor Chairperson, Philosophy and 

Anthropology 
B.A., Hope College; B.D., Western Theological Seminary; S.T.M., General 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D., New York University. (1964) 

C. WHITNEY CARPENTER, II, Professor Foreign Languages 

A.B., Cornell University; M.A., University of Southern California; M.S.Ed., 
Bucknell University; Ph.D., New York University. (1966) 

RONALD R. CHAMPOUX, Assistant Professor Communication Disorders 

B.A., Providence College; M.A.T., Assumption College; M.S., M.A., University 
of Michigan. (1977) 

CHARLES M. CHAPMAN, Associate Professor Business Administration 

B.A., University of Northern Colorado; M.A., New York University. (1977) 

GARY F. CLARK, Assistant Professor Art 

B.F.A., Maryland Institute College of Art; M.A., West Virginia University. 
(1975) 

MARJORIE A. CLAY, Assistant Professor Philosophy and Anthropology 

B.A., University of Oklahoma; M.A., Northwestern University. (1978) 

PAUL C. COCHRANE, Assistant Professor Mathematics 

B.S., M.S., Ph.D., State University of New York. (1975) 

CHARLES W. CHRONISTER, Associate Professor Health, Physical 

Education, and Athletics 
B.S., M.Ed., East Stroudsburg State College. (1971) 

MARGARET M. L. CHU, Assistant Professor Chemistry 

A. A., Sacramento City College; B.A., Sacramento State College; Ph.D., 
University of California. (1973) 

STEVEN L. COHEN, Associate Professor Psychology 

B.A., Oakland University; Ph.D., University of Maine. (1973) 

ANDREW L. COLB, Assistant Professor Chemistry 

B.S., Union College; Ph.D., Northwestern University. (1976) 

JAMES E. COLE, Professor Biological and Allied Health Sciences 

B.A., M.A., Western Michigan University; Ph.D., Illinois State University. 
(1968) 

JOAN M. COLLINS, Assistant Professor Nursing 

B.A., Mary Washington College, R.N., Virginia Baptist Hospital; M.S.N., 
University of Pennsylvania. (1978) 

JULIA T. COLLINS, Instructor Admissions Office/ Center for 

Academic Development 
B.A., Upsala College (1979) 

CATHERINE M. CONSTABLE, Instructor Communication Disorders 

B.S., M.Ed., Bloomsburg State College (1979) 

JOHN F. COOK, JR., Assistant Professor Art 

B.F.A., McGill University; M.A., Columbia University. (1974) 

JOHN H. COUCH, Associate Professor Music 

A.R.C.T., Royal Conservatory of Music, Toronto; M.M., Indiana University 
School of Music. (1972) 

JAMES B. CREASY, Professor Business Administration 

B.S., Bloomsburg State College; M.S.B.A., Bucknell University; D.Ed., The 
Pennsylvania State University. (1960) 



14 I \. i i n 

SYLVIA H ( RONIN, Associate Professor 

Hid. M.Ed., Rhode Island College ol Education; M.Ed., Ihe Pennsylvania 

State University. 1 1964) 

ROB] R I (. I) W I NPOR I. Associate Professor 
B S., M.S., Bueknell University. (1961) 

Wll I [AM K. DECK] R, Professor 

B S . M.M., Eastman School of Music of the University of Rochester. DM \ 
lemple University. (1963) 

HI A IS I DM MS. Associate Professor Foreign languages 

A.B., Lukow University; M.A., Fordham University. (1965) 

JOHN I .1)1 WEN, Assistant Professor Business Administration 

B.S., Bloomsburg State College; M.S., Bueknell University. (1965) 

DANIEL S. DESSEL, Instructor Speech Communication and 

Theairt 
B.A., Franklin and Marshall College; M.A., Northern Illinois University. (1978) 

RUSSELL B. DeVORE, Assistant Professor Ph. 

B.A., Gettysburg College; M.S., Ph.D., West Virginia University. (1976) 

LOUIS F. DeWEIN, Assistant Professor Biological and Allied 

Health St 
B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Ohio State University. (1978) 

JOHN C. DIETRICH, Associate Professor Hist 

A.B., Capital University; M.A., Ohio State University. (1965) 

LESTER J. DIETTERICK, Associate Professor Business Administration 

B.S., M.Ed., Bloomsburg State College; M.S.B.A., Bueknell University. (1966) 

RONALD V. DiGIONDOMENICO, Instructor Center for Academn 

Development 
B.A., Bloomsburg State College; M.S.W., Marywood College. (1977) 

BERNARD C. DILL, Professor Business Administration 

B.S., M.B.A., The Pennsylvania State University; D.B.A., George Washington 
University. (1968) 

BARBARA M. DILWORTH, Associate Professor vomia 

B.A., Chestnut Hill College; M.A., University of Pennsylvania. (1966) 

RICHARD J. DONALD, Assistant Professor Elementary and F.arlv 

Childhood Education 
B.S East Stroudsbnrg State College; M.S., Kansas State University. 1 1968) 

II 1)1 I H IV DOWNING, Associate Professor Biological and Allied 

Health St 
B.S., Bowling Green State University; M.A., Ph.D.. State Universit) ol New 
York at Buffalo. (1975) 

V IRGINIA A DICK. Assistant Professor English 

B v. ihe Pennsylvania State University; M.A., Bueknell University. (1958) 

WILLI W1 D I ISI NBI RG, Associate Pro!. English 

B \ . Universit) Ol Delaware; MA. 1 ehigfa University . (I960) 

JOHN \ ENMAN, Professoi trophy and Earth & 

B \ . University Ol Maine: M.A . Harvard I'mversitv; Ph.D.. University ol Pit- 
tsburgh. (1959) 



Faculty 15 

PHILLIP A. FARBER, Professor Biological and Allied 

Health Sciences 
B.S., King's College; M.S., Boston College; Ph.D., Catholic University ol 
America. (1966) 

RONALD A. FERDOCK, Associate Professor English 

A.B., St. Vincent College; M.A., The Pennsylvania State University. (1965) 

JOHN R. FLETCHER, Assistant Professor Biological and Allied 

Health Sciences 
B.S., M.Ed., Bloomsburg State College. (1969) 

GERTRUDE E. FLYNN, Professor Chairperson, Nursing 

R.N., Carney Hospital; B.S., University of Rochester; M.S., University of Buf- 
falo; D.N.S., Boston University. (1974) 

ARIADNA FOUREMAN, Professor Foreign Languages 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., The Ohio State University. (1969) 

WENDELIN R. FRANTZ, Professor Chairperson, Geography and 

Earth Science 
A.B., College of Wooster; M.S., Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh. (1968) 

HAROLD K. FREY, Associate Professor Business Administration 

B.S., Lock Haven State College; M.A., State College of Iowa; M.S., Elmira 
College. (1978) 

ERICH F. FROHMAN, Associate Professor Speech Communication 

and Theatre Arts 
B.A., Columbia College; M.A., Syracuse University. (1966) 

ROGER W. FROMM, Assistant Professor Library, Reference Librarian 

B.A., Ohio Wesleyan University; M.Ed., University of Vermont; M.L.S., Rut- 
gers University. (1974) 

WILLIAM J. FROST, Assistant Professor Library, Reference Librarian 

B.A., Old Dominion University; M.L.S., Rutgers Graduate School of Library 
Service; M.A., University of Scranton. (1972) 

LAWRENCE B. FULLER, Associate Professor English 

A.B., Dartmouth College; M.A., Columbia University; Ph.D., The Johns 
Hopkins University. (1971) 

FRANCIS J. GALLAGHER, Associate Professor Business Administration 

A.B., Stonehill College; M.B.A., Temple University. (1972) 

LUCILLE A. GAMBARDELLA, Assistant Professor Nursing 

B.S.N., Villanova University; M.S.N., Boston University. (1978) 

P. JOSEPH GARCIA, Associate Professor Physics 

B.S., Kent State University; M.S., New Mexico Highlands University; D.Ed., 
The Pennsylvania State University. (1968) 

MARY T. GARDNER, Instructor Health, Physical Education and Athletics 

B.S., M.Ed., East Stroudsburg State College. (1974) 

HALBERT F. GATES, Professor Physics 

B.S., Milwaukee State Teachers College; Ph.M., University of Wisconsin; 
Ph.D., Michigan State University. (1969) 

MICHAEL W. GAYNOR, Professor Psychology 

B.A., Muhlenberg College; M.S., Lehigh University; Ph.D., Colorado State 
University. (1970) 



16 Faculty 

GEORG] i (.III 1 iate Profa Biological and Allied Health 

Ms. Muhlenberg College; Ms. Ohio University; Ph.D. Ihc Pennsvlvama 
State University. ( 1965) 

\1 \K Il\ M (.11 DEA, Associate Professor Political S 

B \ . v \mcent College; M \ UmversiQ ol Notre Dame. (1966) 

\ \\( > (. GILGANNON, Associate Professor Educational Studies and St f 

B S . Bloomsburg State College; M.S.. Marywood College; D.Ed.. The Pennsyl- 
vania State University. (1976) 

\ \\( \ E (.11 1 . Assistant Professor dish 

B.A.. M \ . Washington State University. (1968) 

NORMAN M GILLMEISTER, Associate Professor Geography and 

Earth Science 
B.A.. Harvard College; M.A., Indiana University; M.A.. Ph.D., Harvard 
University. (1973) 

GLENN A. GOOD, Associate Professor Secondary Education 

B.S., M.S.. Bucknell University; D.Ed., The Pennsylvania State Universitv 
(1969) 

S WDRA M. GOODLING, Assistant Professor Sursing 

B.S., Cornell University; M.S., The Pennsylvania State University. (1978) 

DAVID E. GREENWALD, Associate Professor Sociology and Social Welfare 

B.A., University of Pennsylvania; M.A., Ph.D.. University of California at 
Berkeley. (1970)' 

PEARL G. GROSSMAN, Assistant Professor Communication Disorders 

B.S.. University of Minnesota; M.S., Washington University. (1976) 

I \WE S. GROWNEY, Professor Mathematics 

A.B., Bucknell University; M.A., Lehigh University; Ph.D., University of 
Oklahoma. (1970) 

ERVEN E F. GULLEY, Associate Professor English 

A.B., Bucknell University; M.A., Ph.D.. Lehigh University. (1970) 

E. BUREL GUM, Assistant Professor Business Administration 

B.S., Bloomsburg State College, M.S.B.A., Bucknell University. (1970) 

HANS KARL GUNTHER. Professor History 

A.B., M.A., Washington University; Ph.D., Stanford University. (1965) 

MAUREEN S. HARE. Instructor Nursing 

B.S.N. , College of Mt. Saint Vincent. (1978) 

DAVID J. HARPER, Professor Ph. 

B.S., Ph.D., University of Nottingham. (1966) 

PAUL Ci. HARTUNG, Associate Professor Mathemc 

B.A., Montclair State College; M.A., Universitv of Colorado; Ph.D., The Pen- 
nsylvania State University. (1968) 

THFODORI A. HARTZ, Instructor Business Administration 

AS. Peirce Junior College; B.S., Bloomsburg State College. MB V. I ehigh 

University. (1977) 
iohn I HARTZEL, Assistant Professor Business Administration 

B S . Bloomsburg State College; M.Ed.. Lehigh University. (1970) 

LOISH HECKMAN, Associate Professor Vunotg 

R V. Ihc Reading Hospital School ol Nursing; B.S.. Fh/abethtown College; 

M.Ed . Did. roc Pennsylvania State University. (1977) 



Faculty/ 17 

MICHAEL HERBERT, Professor Biological and Allied Health Sciences 

B.S., University of Maryland; Ph.D., Lehigh University. (1963) 

DAVID G. HESKEL, Associate Professor Business Administration 

M.B.A., Ph.D., University of Business, Vienna, Austria. (1976) 

CHARLOTTE M. HESS, Associate Professor Elementary and Early 

Childhood Education 
B.S., M.Ed., Bloomsburg State College; Ph.D., The Pennsylvania State 
University. (1972) 

ROBERT B. HESSERT, Associate Professor Psychology 

B.A., M.S., The Pennsylvania State University; Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh. 
(1972) 

SUSAN J. HI BBS, Instructor Health, Physical Education, and Athletics 

B.S., Western Kentucky University; M.Ed., East Stroudsburg State College. 
(1975) 

NORMAN L. HILGAR, Professor Chairperson, Business Administration 

B.A., Grove City College; M.A., Ed.D., University of Pittsburgh. (1956) 

FREDERICK C. HILL, Assistant Professor Biological and Allied 

Health Sciences 
B.S., M.S., Illinois State University; Ph.D., University of Louisville. (1975) 

MARY E. HILL, Associate Professor Special Education 

B.S., Bloomsburg State College; M.Ed., University of Delaware. (1973) 

CRAIG L. HIMES, Professor Chairperson, Biological and Allied 

Health Sciences 
B.S., Clarion State College; M.S., Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh. (1961) 

CLAYTON H. HINKEL, Associate Professor Business Education 

B.S., Bloomsburg State College; M.Ed., Temple University. (1947) 

CARL M. HINKLE, Assistant Professor Health, Physical Education, 

and Athletics 
B.S., Montana State University; M.S., Ithaca College. (1971) 

MELVILLE HOPKINS, Professor Chairperson, Speech Communication 

and Theatre Arts 
A.B., M.A., Bucknell University; Ph.D., The Pennsylvania State University. 
(1960) 

LEE C. HOPPLE, Professor Geography and Earth Science 

B.S., Kutztown State College; M.S., Ph.D., The Pennsylvania State University. 
(1961) 

JULIA T. HORGAN, Assistant Professor Nursing 

B.S., College of Mt. Saint Vincent; M.A., New York University. (1978) 

MARK A. HORNBERGER, Associate Professor Geography and Earth 

Science 
B.S., Bloomsburg State College; M.A., Southern Illinois University; Ph.D., The 
Pennsylvania State University. (1970) 

RUSSELL E. HOUK, Associate Professor Health, Physical Education, 

and Athletics 
B.A., Lock Haven State College; M.S., Bucknell University. (1957) 



i n 

JOHM k HRANITZ, htoriaff Professor Elementary and Earfy 

Childhood Education 

Hs M.Ed., Ed.D., Indiana I m\ersitv of Pennsylvania. (1972) Commonwealth 

I nceptional Service Award Co-Winner 1977-78. 

FAMES H Hi HI R. Professor Chairperson. Sociology and Social Wi 

Hs. Bloomsburg State (olk-gc; MA. I ni\ersit> ol Delaware; Phi). The 
Pennsylvania state University. (1972) 

kl wi IH P Hi \l. Associate Professor ation 

H s . M.Ed., State Iniversitv ol New York at Buffalo; Ph.D.. Iniversitv ol Pit- 
tsburgh. (1975) 

JANET M. HUTCHINSON. Instructor Health. Physical 

Education, and Athletu s 
H.S.. East Stroudsburg State College. (1978) 

RALPH R. IRf I AND. Professor Sociology and Social Welfare 

B.A., M.A., University of Toronto; Ph.D., University of Chicago. (1969) 

CHARLES G. JACKSON, Professor Political S 

A.B., Westminster College; M.A., University of North Carolina; Ph.D., The 
Pennsylvania State University. (1960) 

I. SUE JACKSON, Assistant Professor Sociology and Social Welfare 

A.B., Lycoming College; M.S.S.W., Graduate School of Social Work; 
Universitv of Texas. H973^ 

MARY LOU JOHN, Associate Professor Foreign Lanx u 

B.S.. Bloomsburg State College; M.A., Bucknell University; Ph.D., The Pen- 
nsylvania State University. (1959) 

BRIAN A. JOHNSON, Associate Professor Geography and Earth St 

B.S., M.Ed., Indiana University of Pennsylvania; D.Ed., The Pennsylvania 
State University. (1967) 

TERRY H. JONES, Assistant Professor Business Administration 

A.B., Rutgers-The State University; M.B.A.. New York University. (1976) 

WILLIAM L. JONES, Professor Special Education 

B.S., M.Ed., Ed.D., University of Nebraska. (1964) 

WINIFRED L. KAEBNICK, Assistant Professor Nursing 

B.A., Flora Stone Mather College, Case-Western Reserve; M.N.. Francis Payne 
Bolton School of Nursing, Case-Western Reserve; M.A., University o\ Pennsvl- 
vania. (1979) 

PRAKASH C. KAPIL, Associate Professor Political S 

B.A., M.A., University of Delhi; M.A., Universitv oi Rhode Island (19(0 

ANDRIW J. KARPINSKI, Professor Chairperson. Special Education 

H s . M.Ed., D.Ed., The Pennsylvania State Iniversitv. (19(0 

MARTIN \1 KM I 1 R. Associate Professor ucation 

HS. Indiana State College; M.Ed.. Iniversitv of Pittsburgh. (1961) 

MARdARI I A Kl I I Y. Associate ProfeSSOl library. Assistant 

Rt ferenct Librar ia n 

\ H . ( ollege ot Men RocneUe; Ml S .. Iniversitv of Pittsburg. (1969) 
JOHN I Kl Kl l\. JR., Associate ProfeSSOl Mathc" 

A.s . Broward Community College; B.S., Florida Atlantic iniversitv. \i \. 
Ph D. iniversitv ot California, (1977) 



I \< i i n 19 

DAVID KHALIFA, Assistant Professor Business Administration 

B.S., North Carolina State University at Raleigh; M.B.A., Ph.D., The Pennsyl- 
vania State University. (1971) 

SALEEM M. KHAN, Assistant Professor Economics 

B.A., S. E. College, Bahawalpur; M.A., Punjab University; Ph.D., J. Gutenberg 
University. (1978) 

JAMES C. KINCAID, Associate Professor Business Education 

A.B., Steed College; M.A., Appalachian State College; Ed.D., University of 
Georgia. (1978) 

ROBERT L. KLINEDINST, Associate Professor Mathematics 

B.A., Gettysburg College. (1960) 

CHARLES C. KOPP, Professor English 

B.A., Frostburg State College; M.A., West Virginia University; Ph.D., The 
Pennsylvania State University. (1960) 

ROBERT B. KOSLOSKY, Associate Professor Art 

B.S., M.Ed., Kutztown State College, (1970) Commonwealth Teaching Fellow 
and Awarded Distinguished Teaching Chair, 1974-1975 

ELIZABETH A. KRESOVICH, Assistant Professor Nursing 

B.S., Ohio State University; M.N., The Pennsylvania State University. (1978) 

JULIUS R. KROSCHEWSKY, Professor Biological and Allied Health Sciences 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of Texas. (1967) 

NORMAN G. KRUEDELBACH, Assistant Professor Psychology 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Ohio State University. (1977) 

ROBERT J. KRUSE, Associate Professor Chairperson, Communication Disorders 
B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Temple University. (1975) 

L. RICHARD LARCOM, Associate Professor Psychology 

B.S., M.A., Ph.D., Ohio State University. (1972) 

OLIVER J. LARMI, Associate Professor Philosophy and Anthropology 

A.B., Dartmouth College; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania. (1968) 

CHARLES W. LAUDERMILCH, Assistant Professor Sociology and 

Social Welfare 
B.A., Moravian College, M.S.W., Wayne State University. (1978) 

MARGARET READ LAUER, Assistant Professor English 

A.B., University of Michigan; M.A., Indiana University. (1966) 

JAMES R. LAUFFER, Associate Professor Geography and Earth Science 

B.S., Allegheny College; M.S., University of Hawaii. (1966) 

CAROLINE A. LeBLANC, Assistant Professor Nursing 

B.S.N., Boston College; M.S.N., University of Maryland. (1978) 

WOO BONG LEE, Associate Professor Chairperson, Economics 

B.S., Delaware Valley College; M.S., Ph.D., Rutgers University. (1972) 

ELLEN L. LENSING, Professor Business Education 

B.Ed.. Wisconsin State College; M.S., Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. (1963) 

MILTON LEVIN, Associate Professor Secondary Education 

B.S., West Chester State College; M.Ed., Temple University; M.S., University 
of Pennsylvania. (1967) 



; \< I I n 

\1K HMI \1 LEVINE, tsustant Profc Psych 

MS. BrooUyn Colley; M \ Western Michigan College; Ph.D., I niversity of 
Hawaii i 

MARGARE1 i LONG, Associate Profa Chairperson. Buso 

B S . Indiana State College; M.Ed., The Pennsylvania State University; PhD 
I mversitv ot Pittsburgh. (1961) 

I W11 s 1 1 OR 11 1 1. Associate Professor -jraphy and Earth S 

A.B. State Iniversitv of Nen York at Binghamton; M A . Syracute I riven 
Ph.D.. Southern Illinois University. (1967) 

MICHAEI R LYNN, Assistant Professor Business Administration 

B.A.. t niversity of Rhode Island; J.D.. Temple University. (1978) 

ARTHUR W. LYSIAK, Associate Professor His: 

B.S.. M.A.. Ph.D., Loyola University. (1970) 

HOW ARI) K MACAULEY, JR., Professor Educational Studies and Ser 

A.B., Bucknell University; M.A., Stanford University; M.Ed.. Temple 
University; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania. (1967) 

LAWRENCE L. MACK, Associate Professor Chemistry 

A.B.. Middlebury College; Ph.D., Northwestern University. (1972) 

ROBERT R. MacMURRAY. Associate Professor Economics 

B.A., Ursinus College; M.B.A., Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania. (1971) 

THOMAS R MANLEY. Professor Biological and Allied 

Health Sciences 
B.A.. Fairmount State College; M.S.. West Virginia University. (1964) 

COLLEEN J. MARKS, Associate Professor Special Education 

B.A., Edinboro State College; M.A., University of Illinois; Ed.D., Lehigh 
University. (1969) 

JOHN P. MASTER, Associate Professor 

B.S., Juniata College; M.M., West Virginia University; DMA., Combs College 
of Music. (1971) 

RICHARD E. McCLELLAN, Assistant Professor Business Administration 

B.S., M.Ed., Bloomsburg State College; M.S.. Bucknell University. (1975) 

LAVERE W. McCLURE, Associate Professor Geography and Earth S. 

B.S., Mansfield State College; M.N.S.. University of South Dakota. (1963) 

JO WNE E. McCOMB, Associate Professor Health. Physical Education. 

and Athlans 
B.S., Slippery Rock State College; M.Ed.. The Pennsylvania State University 
(I960) 

A. J. McDONNEl L, JR., Associate Professor Chairperson. Secondary Education 

B.A., M.Ed., The Pennsylvania State I 'niversity. (1962) 

DOROTHY O. McHALE. Assistant Professor English 

A.B., Trinity College; M.A.. Iniversitv ot Pittsburgh. (1968) 

MICHA1 1 I McHAl 1. Associate Professor tch Communication 

and Thcatrt 
A.B., Iniversitv ot Pittsburgh; M.A., Western Reserve Iniversitv (1963) 

El I W. McLAUGHLIN. Associate PlofetSOl Health. Physical Education. 

and Athletics 
B S . M 1 d . West Chester State College. (1961) 



I \< I I.TY/21 

JOHN M. McLAUGHLIN, Professor Special Mutation 

B.S., Lock Haven State College; M.Ed., D.Ed., The Pennsylvania State University. 
(1968) Commonwealth Teaching Fellow and Awarded Distinguished Teaching Chair, 

1977-78. 

JERRY K. MEDLOCK, Professor Chairperson, Health, Physical 

Education, and Athletics 
A.B., Samford University; M.A., Ed.D., University of Alabama. (1969) 

ROBERT G. MEEKER, Assistant Professor English 

A.B., Lafayette College; M.A., University of Scranton. (1962) 

JACK L. MEISS, Associate Professor Business Education 

B.S., The Pennsylvania State University; M.Ed., Temple University. (1966) 

RICHARD L. MICHERI, Assistant Professor Political Science 

B.A., Fordham University; M.A., Columbia University. (1968) 

DONALD C. MILLER, Professor Elementary and Early Childhood Education 

B.S., Ph.D., Ohio State University; M.Ed., Bowling Green State University. 
(1971) 

G. DONALD MILLER, JR., Associate Professor Communication Disorders 

B.S., Indiana Universitv of Pennsylvania; M.A., Temple University. (1970) 

GORMAN L. MILLER, Associate Professor Elementary and Early 

Childhood Education 
B.A., La Verne College; M.S., Indiana University; Ed.D., Ball State University. 
(1973) 

NELSON A. MILLER, Associate Professor Music 

B.S., Indiana University of Pennsylvania; M.Ed., The Pennsylvania State 
University. (1953) 

ROBERT C. MILLER, Professor Educational Studies and Services 

B.S., California State College; M.Ed., Ed.D., University of Pittsburgh. (1961) 

SCOTT E. MILLER, JR., Associate Professor Library, 

Readers' Services Librarian 
A.B., M.A., M.L.S., University of Pittsburgh. (1966) 

DAVID J. MINDERHOUT, Associate Professor Philosophy and Anthropology 

A.A., Grand Rapids Junior College; B.A., M.A., Michigan State University; 
Ph.D., Georgetown University. (1974) 

LOUIS V. MINGRONE, Professor Biological and Allied 

Health Sciences 
B.S., Slippery Rock State College; M.S., Ohio University; Ph.D., Washington 
State University. (1968) 

RAJESH K. MOHINDRU, Associate Professor Economics 

B.A., M.A., DAV College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania. (1975) 

JOSEPH E. MUELLER, Associate Professor Mathematics 

B.S., Butler University; M.S., University of Illinois. (1965) 

JAMES F. MULLEN, Instructor Center for Academic Development 

B.S., The Pennsylvania State University. (1978) 

ALLEN F. MURPHY, Professor Chairperson, Foreign Languages 

A.B., Kenyon College; M.A., Ph.D., The Ohio State University. (1972) 

STEWART L. NAGEL, Associate Professor Art 

B.F.A., Cooper Union; M.F.A., Pratt Institute. (1972) 



i n 

NANC1 K NALLY, tssistani Profesi 

B S v > lii i niversity; \1 s State Univenity 

(iioKdi \v mm Associate Prafcstoi 

B.S., Glastbora State College; Diploma (French), Universit) i 
Diploma (German), University of Heidelberg; a m . Rutgen Univenity. 

FAMES H Ml ISW1 ND1 K. Assistant Professor \tudket 

an j 
B.S., M.I d . Bloomshurg State College. (1969) 

( R \u. \ \i w ion Professor 

B \. Universit) oi Pennsylvania; M.A., Southern Illinois Univenity; PhD. 
Western Reserve University. (1966) 

MSN s Nil KM. Assistant Professor Via 

R.N., Ihomas Jefferson University Hospital; B.S.. lemple Un M s \ . 

Universit) ol Pennsylvania. (1978) 

VNNMARI1 NOAKES, Professor Elementary and Early Childhood i 

B s . M.Ed., The Pennsylvania State University; Ph.D.. Universit) ol IX-. 
( 1970) Commonwealth Exceptional Service Award Co- Winner 1977-78. 

( n 1)1 S NOBLE, Professor mistry 

A.B., Grinnell College; Ph.D., University of Hawaii. (1968) 

RONA1 DW. NOVAK, Associate Professor Hiathenu 

lis. California State College; M.Ed., Universit) of Pittsburgh; M \ 

University of Illinois. (1964) 

WILLIAM S. O'BRUBA, Professor Chairperson. Elemt 

and Early Childhood Education 

B.S., California State College; M.Ed.. Duquesne University; Ed.D.. Indiana 
University of Pennsylvania. (1973) Awarded Certificate for Exceptional 
Academic Service, 1974-1975. 

THOMAS L. OHL, Assistant Professor \tathen 

B.S., Bloomsburg State College; M.Ed., Millersville State College. | I 

JANET R. OLSEN, Assistant Professor 

Assistant Acquisition Librarian 
B.S . Kut/toun State College; M.S.L.S., Syracuse University. (1968) 

CI IN ION J. OXENRIDER, Associate Professor Math m 

B.S., Bloomsburg State College; M.A., The Pennsylvania State University. 

(1965) 

DANIE1 C. PANTALEO, Assistant Professor miatry 

B s . Manhattan College; Ph.D.. Emory University. (1977) 
\1 \RII \ PARN1 I I . \ssisiant Prof« V. 

R n . (ieismger Hospital; B.s , Universit) ol Pennsylvania; M \ . leachefi 
College I 1976) 

iwiisVn PERCEY, Associate Profest Pohti 

\ B. i niversit) ol Pennsylvania; M.A., Rutgers University. (1965) 

LAURETTA PIERCE, Associate Professor Vui 

RN. Harrisburg Polyclinic Hospital School ol Nursing. B.S.Ed., lemple 

Univenity; Ph D. Jefferson Medical College (15 
IOS1 I'll R I'll I R. Assistant Professoi fraphy and Earth Si 

B S . Clarion State College. \1 \ . \n/ona State Universit) | 1969) 



Faculty 2* 

JANE J. PLUM PIS, Associate Professor Sociology and Social Welfare 

B.A., Lock Haven State College; M.A., St. Bonavcnture University. (1967) 

ROY D. POINTER, Professor Chairperson, Chemistry 

B.S., University of Kansas; M.S., Ph.D., University of Michigan. (1969) 

AARON POLONSKY, Assistant Professor Library, Acquisition Librarian 

A.B., University of Pennsylvania; B.S.L.S., Drexel Institute of Technology. 
(1968) 

JAMES C. POM FRET, Associate Professor Mathematics 

B.S., Bates College; M.S., New Mexico State University; Ph.D., University of 
Oklahoma. (1972) 

ALEX J. POPLAWSKY, Assistant Professor Psychology 

B.S., University of Scranton; M.S., Ph.D., Ohio University. (1974) 

H. BENJAMIN POWELL, Professor History 

A.B., Drew University; M.A., Ph.D., Lehigh University. (1966) 

GERALD W. POWERS, Professor Communication Disorders 

B.A., University of Massachusetts; M.Ed., University of New Hampshire; 
Ed.D., University of Northern Colorado. (1971) 

RONALD E. PUHL, Associate Professor Health, Physical Education, 

and Athletics 
B.S., Lock Haven State College; M.A., West Chester State College. (1966) 

SALIM QURESHI, Assistant Professor Business Administration 

B.S., University of Karachi; M.B.A., Adelphi University; (1976) 

DONALD D. RABB, Professor Biological and Allied Health Sciences 

B.S., Bloomsburg State College; M.A., Bucknell University; D.Ed., The 
Pennsylvania State University. (1957) 

FRANCIS J. RADICE, Professor Assistant Chairperson, Business 

Administration 
B.S., Bloomsburg State College; M.Ed., D.Ed., The Pennsylvania State 
University. (1957) 

CARROLL J. REDFERN, Associate Professor Special Education 

B.S., Johnson C. Smith University; M.Ed., Bloomsburg State College. (1969) 

ROBERT R. REEDER, Associate Professor Philosophy and Anthropology 

B.A., M.S., The Pennsylvania State University; M.A., University of Colorado. 
(1968) 

BURTON T. REESE, Associate Professor Health, Physical Education, 

and Athletics 
B.A., M.Ed., East Stroudsburg State College. (1969) 

JAMES T. REIFER, Associate Professor Special Education 

B.S., Shippensburg State College; M.Ed., The Pennsylvania State University. 
(1966) 

ROBERT L. REMALEY, JR., Assistant Professor Elementary and 

Early Childhood Education 
B.S., Millersville State College; Ed.M., Temple University. (1972) 

EMILY A. REUWSAAT, Professor Special Education 

A.B., M.A.Ed., University of Northern Iowa; Ed.D., University of Nebraska. 
(1965) 



i n 

STANLEY \ RHODES, Associate Professor Biological and ABhd 

Heal 
B S . M \ i Diversity ol Virginia. (1964) 

\l V \ W KKI. UlOCiatC Professor Aish 

B S . Madison College; M a . Indiana Univenity. (I9< 
ROB1 Ki D Ki( Ml Y t Associate Professoi Speech Communk 

and 1 h, 

\ \\. M \ ohm State University. (1963) 

PATRICIA B ROADARMEL, Instructor Bust 

B s . Bloomsburg State College. (1979) 

PERCIVA1 K ROBERTS, III, Professor Chatrpei 

B v. M.A., University of Delaware; Ed.D., Illinois State University; Honorary 

Litt.D., L'Libre Universite Asie. (1968) Commonwealth Teaching Fellow, 1974- 
1975, Commonwealth Exceptional Service Award, 1976. 

CHANG SHUB ROH, Professor Sociology and Social Welfare 

B.A., Dong-A University; C.S.W., M.S.W., Ph.D., Louisiana State University. 

(1971) 

ROLAND J. ROM BERG ER, Instructor Business Education 

B.S., M.B.A., The Pennsylvania State University. (1975) 

ROBERT L. ROSHOLT, Professor Chairperson. Political S 

B.A., Luther College; M.A.P.A., Ph.D., University of Minnesota. (1969) 

ROBERT P. ROSS, Associate Professor wmia 

B.A., M.A., Washington University. (1967) 

BETTY J. ROST, Assistant Professor Health. Physical Education, and AM 

B.S., East Stroudsburg State College; M.S., Springfield College. (1971) 

RAY C. ROST, Professor Chairperson. Educational Studies and Sen 

B.A., Washington State University; Ed.M., Ed.D., The State University o\ Rut- 
gers. (1969) 

SUSAN RUSINKO, Professor dish 

B.A., Wheaton College; M.A., Ph.D., The Pennsvlvania State University. 

(1959) 

ROBERT G. SAGAR, Associate Professor Biological and Allied Health Sen 

B.S., M.S., Ohio State University. (1963) 

lejBHAM S SAINI, Professor 

B.A., M.A., University of Punjab; D.F., Duke University; Ph.D.. New School, i 
Awarded Certificate tor Exceptional Academic Service 1974-75, Commonwealth 
leaching Fellow and Awarded Distinguished Teaching Chair. 1977-78. 

ROGER B. SANDERS, Associate Professor Health, Physical Education, 

and Athletics 
B.S West Chester State College; M.A., Ball State University. (1972) 

HIIOSHI SATO, Assistant Professor Speech Communication and 

Theatre irti 
A.B.. lenn University; M.A., University of North Carolina (1972) 

MARTIN \ SATZ, Professor Psychology 

B \ . \i \ . University ol Minnesota; Ph.D.. University oi Washington. (1958) 

RICHARD C S WAGE, Associate Professor English 

B.A.. University of North Carolina; M.S., Columbia University. (I960) 



f \< I I.TY/25 

TOBIAS F. SCARPINO, Professor Ph) lU I 

B.S., Kutztown State College; M.S., Bucknell University; D.Ed., The Pennsyl- 
vania State University. (1958) 

MARGIE SCHAEFFER, Instructor Health, Physical Education, 

and Athletics 
B.S., Towson State College, M.Ed., Frostburg State College. (1977) 

CONSTANCE J. SCHICK, Associate Professor Psychology 

B.B.A., Angelo State University; Ph.D., Texas Tech University. (1973) 

BERNARD J. SCHNECK, Associate Professor Sociology and 

Social Welfare 
A.B., University of Scranton; A.M., West Virginia University. (1966) 

SEYMOUR SCHWIMMER, Associate Professor Philosophy and 

Anthropology 
B.S.S., City College of New York; M.A., Columbia University. (1965) 

JOHN S. SCRIMGEOUR, Associate Professor Counselor 

B.S., Bloomsburg State College; M.Ed., The Pennsylvania State University. 
(1959) 

GILBERT R. W. SELDERS, Professor Reading Clinic 

B.A., M.Ed., D.Ed., The Pennsylvania State University. (1957) 

REX E. SELK, Associate Professor Chemistry 

A.B., Knox College; M.S., State University of Iowa. (1959) 

JOHN J. SERFF, JR., Assistant Professor Geography and Earth Science 

B.S., The Pennsylvania State University; M.Ed., West Chester State College. 
(1969) 

THEODORE M. SHANOSKI, Associate Professor History 

B.S., East Stroudsburg State College; M.A., Ohio University; Ed.D., Temple 
University. (1964) 

SAMUEL B. SLIKE, Assistant Professor Communication Disorders 

B.S., The Pennsylvania State University; M.S., The University of Scranton. 
(1979) 

RALPH SMILEY, Associate Professor History 

B.A., Brooklyn College; M.A., Ph.D., Rutgers University. (1969) 

RICHARD M. SMITH, Assistant Professor Communication Disorders 

B.S., Edinboro State College; M.A., Temple University. (1967) 

RILEY B. SMITH, Assistant Professor English 

B.A., Ph.D., The University of Texas. (1977) 

ERIC W. SMITHNER, Professor Foreign Languages 

A.B., Muskingum College; M.A., Ph.D., New York University; Certificate Gre- 
noble, Middlebury, Hautes Etudes Diplome Bordeaux-Toulouse. (1967) 

ROBERT R. SOLENBERGER, Associate Professor Philosophy and 

Anthropology 
A.B., M.A., University of Pennsylvania. (1960) 

JAMES R. SPERRY, Professor History 

B.A., Bridgewater College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Arizona. (1968) 

MARGARET M. SPONSELLER, Professor Reading Clinic 

B.S., Indiana State College; M.Ed., D.Ed., The Pennsylvania State University. 
(1962) 



26 Faculty 

\\ll I l \\1 i SPROULE, Assistant Professor istam Chairpet 

Health. Physical Education, and Athk 
A B .. Syracuse University; M.S., Brooklyn College. M969) 

RICHARD J. STANIS1 AW. Professor Chairperson, \fusn 

B.S., Philadelphia College of Bible; B.M.Ed., MM., Temple University; 
D.M.A., University of Illinois. (1969) 

GEORGE E. STETSON, Assistant Professor Geography and Earth Science 

B.A., Yale University; M.A., University of Delaware; Ph.D., University of 
North Carolina. (1973) 

GERALD H. STRAUSS, Professor English 

A.B., University of Pennsylvania; M.A., Ed.D., Columbia University. (1961) 

HARRY C. STRINE, III, Assistant Professor Speech Communication and 

Theatre Arts 
B.A., Susquehanna University; M.A., Ohio University. (1970) 

BARBARA J. STROHMAN, Associate Professor Art 

B.S., University of Marvland; M.F.A., Maryland Institute. (1969) 

DAVID A. SUPERDOCK, Professor Chairperson. Physia 

B.S., Bloomsburg State College; M.Ed., D.Ed., The Pennsylvania State 
University. (1960) 

ANTHONY J. SYLVESTER, Associate Professor History 

A.B., Newark College of Rutgers University; M.A., Rutgers University. (1965) 

M. GENE TAYLOR, Professor Physics 

B.S., Muskineum College; M.Sc, Ph.D., Brown University. (1969) 

CHARLES D. THOMAS, Associate Professor Director for 

Counseling Services 
B.A., M.A., University of Michigan. (1968) 

LOUIS F. THOMPSON, Professor Chairperson, English 

A.B., Columbia College; M.A., Ph D., Lehigh University. (1963) 

ALFRED E. TONOLO, Professor Foreign Languages 

B.A., Lottorio College; M.A., Colgate University; Ph.D., Madrid University. 

(1967) 

JUNE L. TRUDNAK, Professor Mathematics 

B.S., Bloomsburg State College; M.S., Bucknell University; Ph.D., The Pen- 
nsylvania State I'niversitv. (1968) 

HENRY C. TURBERVILLE, JR., Associate Professor Health, Physical 

Education, and Athletics 
B.S., M.A., University of Alabama. (1967) 

GEORGE A. TURNER, Associate Professor History 

B.S., M.S., Eastern Illinois University. (1965) 

DONALD A. VANNAN, Professor Elementary and Early Childhood 

Education 
B.S., Millersville State College; M.Ed., D.Ed., The Pennsylvania State 
University (I96h 

JOSEPH P. VAUGHAN, Professor Biological and Allied 

Health Sciences 
B.S., University Of Maine; M.Ed., D.Ed., The Pennsylvania Suite Iniversity. 
(1967) 

J. CALVIN WALKER, Professor Psychology 

B.A.. Muskingum College; Ed.M., Ed.D., Temple University. (1967) 



Fa< ii iy/27 



STEPHEN C. WALLACE, Associate Professor Music 

B.S., Mansfield State College; M.M., University of Michigan. (1967) 

CHARLES T. WALTERS, Assistant Professor Art 

B.M., DePauw University; M.F.A., University of Wisconsin; Ph.D., The 
University of Michigan. (1977) 

PETER B. WALTERS, Instructor Counselor, Upward Bound Program 

B.S., Bloomsburg State College; M.A., University of Scranton. (1978) 

R. EDWARD WARDEN, Associate Professor Elementary and Early 

Childhood Education 
B.S., Millersville State College; M.A., Villanova University. (1967) 

ROBERT D. WARREN, Professor Chairperson, History 

B.S., Appalachian State Teachers College; M.A., Ph.D., Georgetown 
University. (1964) 

DAVID E. WASHBURN, Professor Educational Studies and Services 

B.A., M.Ed., Ph.D., University of Arizona; Postdoctoral Certificate in Multi- 
cultural Education, University of Miami. (1972) 

LYNN A. WATSON, Professor Elementary and Early Childhood Education 

B.S., Shippensburg State College; M.Ed., D.Ed., The Pennsylvania State 
University. (1966) 

ROBERT N. WATTS, Associate Professor Business Administration 

B.S., Susquehanna University; M.B.A., Ohio University. (1975) 

MARGARET S. WEBBER, Professor Special Education 

B.S., State University of New York, College at Oneonta; M.S., Temple 
University; Ed.D., Temple University. (1968) 

PATRICIA A. WEIGEL, Assistant Professor Catalog Librarian 

B.A., Cornell College; M.A., University of Iowa; M.A., University of Minne- 
sota. (1976) 

JULIA M. WEITZ, Assistant Professor Communication Disorders 

B.S., Emerson College; M.S., University of Pittsburgh. (1978) 

DORETTE E. WELK, Instructor Nursing 

B.S.N., D'Youville College; M.S.N., University of Pennsylvania. (1977) 

NORMAN E. WHITE, Professor Chemistry 

A.B.. Wittenberg University; M.S., Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania. (1965) 

CHRISTINE T. WHITMER, Associate Professor Foreign Languages 

B.A., Ball State University; M.A., The Pennsylvania State University. (1966) 

JAMEs R. WHITMER, Associate Professor History 

B.A., M.A., Ball State University. (1964) 

JOHN B. WILLIMAN, Associate Professor History 

B.S., College of Charleston; M.A., University of Alabama; Ph.D., St. Louis 
University. (1969) 

KENNETH T. WILSON, JR., Associate Professor Art 

B.S., Edinboro State College; M.S., The Pennsylvania State University. (1963) 

MELVYN L. WOODWARD, Professor Business Administration 

A.B., Bucknell University; M.B.A., Ph.D., Ohio State University. (1976) 



1 ICULT1 

Wll I I AM S WOZN1 K \ss,,uate Professor Elementary and Early 

Childhood Education 
B.S., MS . Id I).. Syracuse University. (1970) 

IRVIN WRIGHT, Assistant Professor Assistant Director of the Center 

for Academic Development 
A. A., Dodge Cit> Junior College; B.Ed., State University of New York; M.Ed., 
University of Toledo. (1977) 

STEPHEN G WUKOVITZ, Associate Professor Ph. 

B.A., M.A., Montclair State College. (1968) 

ROBERT P. YORI, Assistant Professor Business Administration 

B.S., Bloomsburg State College; MB. A., Lehigh University. (1969) 

WILLIAM M. YOUNG, Professor Business Administration 

B.A.. Syracuse University; M.A., Princeton University; DBA.. Kent State 
University. (1978) 

JANICE M. YOUSE, Assistant Professor Speech Communication and 

Theatre ArtX 
B.S., M.A., Temple University. (1965) 

JOSEPH M. YOUSHOCK, Assistant Professor Special Education 

B.S., M.Ed., Bloomsburg State College. (1971) 

JOSEPH R. ZANDARSKI, Professor Business Administration 

B.S., University of Scranton; M.B.A., New York University; Ph.D., University 
of Pittsburgh. (1977) 

MARILOU W. ZELLER, Instructor Library, Assistant Catalog Librarian 

B.S., West Virginia Wesleyan College; M.L.S., University of Pittsburgh. (1978) 

LOIS P. ZONG, Assistant Professor S'ursing 

R.N., Jefferson Medical College Hospital; B.S.N., M.S.N., University of 
Pennsylvania. (1978) 

MATTHEW ZOPPETTI, Professor Educational Studies and Services 

B.S., California State College; M.Ed., University of Pittsburgh; Ph.D.. 
University of Maryland. (1969) 



Adjia< i Faci lty 29 



Adjunct Faculty 
Medical Technology Program 



Abington Memorial Hospital 
Abington, Pa. 

JOHN W. ELMAN, M.D., Director 

MS. BARBARA J. SCHEELJE, MT (ASCP), Educational Coordinator 

Geisinger Medical Center 
Danville, Pa. 

JOHN J. MORAN, M.D., Director 

AL SWARTENTRUBER, B.S., MT (ASCP), Educational Coordinator 

Lancaster General Hospital 
Lancaster, Pa. 

WARD M. O'DONNELL, M.D., Director 

JOSEPH J. GALLOGHER, Director, Education and Training 

Robert Packer Hospital 
Sayre, Pa. 

DONALD R. WAEVER, M.D., Director 

JAMES L. BENDER, B.S., MT (ASCP), Educational Coordinator 

Sacred Heart Hospital 
Allentown, Pa. 

F.V. KOSTELNIK, M.D., Director 

MRS. CAROL J. DURKA, MT (ASCP), Educational Coordinator 

St. Joseph's Hospital 
Reading, Pa. 

JASPER CHEN SEE, M.D., Laboratory Director 

MS. JEAN WADE, B.S., MT (ASCP), Educational Director 

Williamsport Hospital 
Williamsport, Pa. 

GENE T. FRIES, M.D., Director 

SANDRA E. RISHEL, MT (ASCP), Educational Coordinator 

Wilkes-Barre General Hospital 
Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 

C.E. RODRIQUEZ, M.D., Director 

MS. HELEN RUANE, MT (ASCP), Education Coordinator 



M) Col i K.i Si k\ h is 



College Services 



ROBERT W. ABBOTT, JR. 

B.A., M.A., University of Delaware. (1978) 
LLOYD H. ANDERSON 
WILLIAM BAILEY, JR. 
PAUL L. CONARD 

B.S., Bloomsburg State College 

BRUCE C. DIETTERICK 

B.A., The Pennsylvania State University 

DONALD E. HOCK 

B.A., Bloomsburg State College 

C. DONALD HOUSENICK 

FRANK A. LORAH 

B.S., Bloomsburg State College 

RICHARD E. NEUFER 

ROBERT RANKIN 

B.S., The Pennsylvania State University 

CHARLES A. ROBBINS 

B.S., Bloomsburg State College 

PAULG. SLOCUM 



Educational Systems Specialist 
Computer Services Center 

Purchasing Agent 

Manager, College Store 

Director of Administrative 
and Personnel Ser 

Director of Public Information 

Director of Budget 

Assistant Director of 
Computer Services 

Student Life Accountant 

Director of Safety and Security 

Systems Program \ia>... 

Director of Physical Plant 
Licensed Physical Therapist 



B.S., South Dakota Wesleyan; Certificate, University of Pennsylvania 



I \< n ry Emeriti 31 



Faculty Emeriti 

HARVEY A. ANDRUSS, President Emeritus (September, 1969^ 

LUCILE J. BAKER (May, 1956) 

IVA MAE V. BECKLEY (May, 1970) 

WILLARD A. CHRISTIAN (May, 1978) 

BEATRICE M. ENGLEHART (August, 1970) 

HOWARD F. FENSTEMAKER (May, 1963) 

WILLIAM C. FORNEY (May, 1959) 

CHESTER M. HAUSKNECHT (July, 1950) 

EDNA J. HAZEN (January, 1958) 

RALPH S. HERRE (May, 1972) 

JOHN A. HOCH, Dean Emeritus (May, 1975) 

ELLAMAE JACKSON (August, 1971) 

ROYCE O. JOHNSON (May, 1973) 

WARREN I. JOHNSON (May, 1977) 

ELINOR R. KEEFER (July, 1968) 

HAROLD H. LANTERMAN (July, 1973) 

MARGARET C. LEFEVRE (December, 1976) 

CYRIL A. LINDQUIST (May, 1975) 

MARY E. MACDONALD (May, 1969) 

PAUL G. MARTIN (July, 1976) 

LUCY McCAMMON (January, 1958) 

MARGARET E. McCERN (May, 1976) 

HILDEGARD PESTEL (August, 1974) 

ETHEL A. RANSON (January, 1954) 

GWENDOLYN REAMS (August, 1976) 

HERBERT H. REICHARD (May, 1971) 

KENNETH A. ROBERTS (August, 1972) 

J. ALMUS RUSSELL (May, 1965) 

WALTER S. RYGIEL (January, 1968) 

MERRITT W. SANDERS (September, 1977) 

RUSSELL F. SCHLEICHER (May, 1962) 

ANNA G. SCOTT (May, 1956) 

JOHN J. SERFF, SR. (May, 1975) 

CECIL C. SERONSY (May, 1973) 

RUTH D. SMEAL (December, 1978) 

JANET STAMM (May, 1977) 

WILLIAM B. STERLING (May, 1973) 

GEORGE G. STRADTMAN (August, 1972) 

THOMAS G. STURGEON (May, 1977) 

WILBERT A. TAEBEL (May, 1976) 

JAMES B. WATTS (February, 1978) 

ELIZABETH B. WILLIAMS (August, 1969) 

M. ELEANOR WRAY (May, 1977) 

♦The date in parentheses is date of retirement. 







^.i. 



*•* 



Generai I\i<>kmation/33 

1. General Information 



1.1 INTRODUCTION 

Bloomsburg State College, as one of the fourteen state-owned institutions 
of higher education in Pennsylvania, has been charged by the Commonwealth to 
serve as "... a center of learning for the best possible education of the youth of 
Pennsylvania in the arts and sciences and to provide able and dedicated 
teachers.. ." 

The arts and sciences are regarded as fundamental to all of the activities 
implied by this charge. During the past several years, the College has moved to 
strengthen the academic departments and to expand the range of services through 
the addition of pre-professional programs, continuing education, programs in the 
health-related sciences and business administration. 

Although dedicated primarily to undergraduate work, the College offers 
masters degrees in teacher education and in certain academic disciplines. 

Bloomsburg State College welcomes qualified students, faculty and staff 
without regard to racial, religious or ethnic backgrounds. 

1.2 ORGANIZATION 

Bloomsburg State College is organized in five schools, Arts and Sciences, 
Professional Studies, Business, Extended Programs and Graduate Studies. The 
scope and internal structure of each school is described in the appropriate chapter 
of this catalogue. 

1.3 LOCATION 

The Town of Bloomsburg, county seat of Columbia County, is an in- 
dustrial, trading, and residential community of 11,000 located on Route 11, 80 
miles north of Harrisburg. It is within two miles of two interchanges of Interstate 
80. 

Bloomsburg is served by the Greyhound and Continental Trailways bus 
lines. Commercial airports are accessible at Wilkes- Barre-Scranton on Route 81, 
and at Williamsport; each is about an hour's drive from Bloomsburg. 

1.4 HISTORY 

An academy "to teach youth the elements of a classical education" was es- 
tablished in Bloomsburg in 1839. The academy continued with varied fortunes 
until 1856, when a charter was prepared and stock issued to reorganize as 
Bloomsburg Literary Institute. A building now known as Carver Hall in memory 
of Henry Carver, principal at the time, was erected in 1867. 

Largely through the efforts of J. P. Wickersham, Superintendent of Public 
Instruction, Bloomsburg Literary Institute became Bloomsburg Literary Institute 
and State Normal School in 1869; it continued under this name and organization 
until 1916 when it was purchased by the Commonwealth and called Bloomsburg 
State Normal School. 

The emphasis at the Normal School changed during the early 1920's from 
secondary and college-preparatory courses for special teachers to full-time teacher 
education. In May 1927 the institutional name was changed to Bloomsburg State 
Teachers College, authorized to grant a Bachelor of Science in Education for 
teachers in elementary and secondary schools. 

Under the administration of President Francis B. Haas (1927-1939), great 
progress was made in the teacher education program; in 1930, a new field was ad- 



U Mi II dis(,s 

dcd with the degree program in Business Education. Several new buildings were 
constructed and IH acres of land added to the campus. 

Upon the appointment of Dr. Haas as State Superintendent of Public 
Instruction, Dr Har\e\ V Andruss. then Dean of Instruction and a former Di- 
rector of the Business Education Department, was appointed president, a position 
he held until his retirement in 1969. During World War II, the I S Navj \-12 Of- 
ficer Training Program uas conducted on the Bloomsburg Campus, a fact still 
commemorated by the name of Navj Hall. In 1957, a Division of Special Educa- 
tion was inaugurated, which is still housed in that building. 

The major expansion of the College in buildings, faculty, and student body 
took place after that, full-time enrollments rising from 1,743 in 1960 to 4,913 in 
the fall of 1978. In 1960 the name of the school was changed to Bloomsburg 
State College; authorization was received shortly thereafter to grant the Bachelor 
of Arts degree for liberal arts programs in humanities, social sciences, and natural 
sciences. In 1960, graduate study leading to the Master of Education degree was 
inaugurated. In 1968, initial approval was received for the degree. Master of Arts 
and in 1970 for the degree. Master of Science. 

Current efforts are directed toward development as a multiple-purpose 
college offering liberal arts and teacher education curricula at the undergraduate 
and master's degree levels, and business and other professional curricula in voca- 
tions other than teaching as these are suited to the resources of the College. 

1.5 ACCREDITATION 

Bloomsburg State College is fully accredited by the Middle States Associa- 
tion of Colleges and Secondary Schools, the National Council for the Accredita- 
tion of Teacher Education, and the Pennsylvania State Board of Education. 

The College is recognized by the American Chemical Society for excellence 
in its Chemistry department, (see Chemistry). 

1.6 BUILDINGS AND FACILITIES 

Campus 

The campus of Bloomsburg State College comprises two tracts called the 
Lower Campus and Upper Campus, with total area of 173 acres. 

The Lower Campus comprises the original campus and adjacent areas sub- 
sequently acquired. It contains the residence halls, dining hall, college store, 
administration building, auditorium, library, academic buildings and recreation 
areas. The Upper Campus, a half mile from the Lower Campus, contains the 
E.H. Nelson Field House, the Redman Stadium, the Litwhiler Baseball Field and 
three practice areas. Long-range plans presume further development of the Upper 
Campus for academic and recreation purposes. 

Instructional Buildings 

Bakeless Center for the Humanities, completed in 1970, is an air-condi- 
tioned building containing classrooms, lecture halls, faculty offices, and an exhibit 
area. It is used primarily by the departments of English, art. foreign languages. 
speech, economics and political science. The building was named for the Bak^ 
family including: Professor Oscar H. Bakeless, a graduate o\~ the school and 
former distinguished member of the faculty; his wife. Sara H. Bakeless. a 
graduate and former faculty member; their son. Dr. John F. Bakeless, a graduate 
of the college, an author, and a recipient of the Alumni Distinguished Semce 
Award; their daughter, Mrs. Alex Nason, a graduate and benefactor of the 
college; and their daughter-in-lau, Mrs (Catherine I Bakeless. graduate of the 
school and a nationally-known author. 

Hartline Science Center, completed in 196S. is an air-conditioned facility 
uith classrooms, lecture halls, seminar rooms, laboratories, faculty offices and an 



Mi ll DINGS 35 

exhibit area; it accommodates the departments of chemistry, physics, biology, 
mathematics, and earth and space science. 

The name of the building honors Daniel S. Hartline, a former teacher of 
biology, and his son Dr. H. Keffer Hartline, 1968 Nobel Prize laureate and 
recipient of an Alumni Distinguished Service Award. 

Sutliff Hall, completed in 1960, contains classrooms and faculty offices of 
the School of Business and several laboratories and classrooms for physical 
sciences. William Boyd Sutliff, for whom the building was named, was a teacher 
of mathematics and the first Dean of Instruction of Bloomsburg State Normal 
School. 

Benjamin Franklin Hall, completed in 1930 for use as a campus laboratory 
school, is now used for college classes, administrative offices, and the Computer 
Services Center. 

Navy Hall was constructed in 1939 as a campus laboratory school but was 
converted during World War II for the use of candidates enlisted in the Navy V- 
12 Officer Training Program. It now houses the work in special education and 
communication disorders and provides a number of other classrooms and offices. 

Science Hall, often called "Old Science" to distinguish it from Hartline 
Science Center, was built in 1906. It houses the Departmental offices of History 
and Psychology and has several classrooms and some facilities used by the Art 
Department. 

Centennial Gymnasium, completed in 1939, contains a gymnasium which 
seats 1,200, two auxiliary gymnasiums, a swimming pool, and offices and class- 
rooms for physical education and athletics. 

E.H. Nelson Field House. This building, located on the Upper Campus, 
was completed in 1972. It provides a varsity basketball court and folding 
bleachers for 2,600 spectators. There is an indoor track, and a six-lane varsity 
swimming pool with seating for 500 spectators. Faculty offices, handball courts, 
classrooms, shower and dressing areas, equipment rooms, and special rooms for 
physical training and therapy are included. The building is used for health and 
physical education classes, varsity athletic contests, and for other activities requir- 
ing seating of large audiences. 

Bus transportation is provided between this building and the Lower 
Campus. 

Dr. E.H. Nelson, for whom the building is named, was for many years Di- 
rector of Athletics. 

Residence Halls, Dining Rooms, College Union 

Columbia Hall, completed in 1970, is a seven-story residence hall for four 
hundred students. It contains lounges, study rooms, recreation areas, a special 
projects rooms, guest rooms, and apartments for counsellors. 

Elwell Hall, completed in 1968, is a nine-story residence hall which can ac- 
commodate 678 students. It contains recreation rooms and lounges, guest rooms, 
study rooms and apartments for staff. Its name honors Judge William Elwell, a 
former trustee of the College, George E. Elwell, his son, a graduate and former 
trustee, and G. Edward Elwell, his grandson, a graduate and former instructor in 
French. 

Luzerne Hall, a four-story residence hall completed in 1967, accommodates 
300 students. It includes lounge and recreation areas, study rooms, and apart- 
ments for counsellors. 

Lycoming Hall, the newest addition to our residence hall community, of- 
ficially opened during the fall of 1976. In addition to housing 250 women, the 
building offers lounges, study rooms, recreation areas, special project facilities, 
and an apartment for the resident dean. 

Montour Hall and Schuylkill Hall, four-story residences completed in 1964, 
each houses 250 students. Each hall is divided into two wings, complete with 



II |)|S(,S 

recreation and lounge facilities, study rooms, and apartments tor resident 
members 

Northumberland Hall, completed in 1960, accommodates 2(H) residents 
I here are lounge and recreation areas, study rooms, and apartment 
members. (Lycoming. I.u/erne. Columbia, Montour, Schuylkill and Northumber- 
land are names ot counties from which many students come to Bloomsburg.) 

I he alignment of halls according to coed and single sexed is subject t 
sion based upon male female enrollment figures and current student needs 

William \\ . Scranton Commons, completed in 1970, is an air-conditioned 
dining facility with one thousand seats and with a capacity to serve 2900 students 
at each meal. Folding partitions permit flexibility of arrangement. A faculty din- 
ing room and two lounges are in the building. William W. Scranton was 
Governor of Pennsylvania from 1963 to 1967. 

College Store. This building was completed in 1956 and used until 1970 as 
the college Commons and from 1970 until 1973 as a temporary Union. The build- 
ing has been remodeled and is now used as the College Store for the sale of 
textbooks and supplies. 

Marguerite W. Kehr College Union. The Kehr Union Building houses a 
commercial branch bank, a formal lounge, a snack bar and dining area, a multi- 
purpose room, a mail room and mailboxes for commuting students, a game 
room, television room, listening room, offices for student organizations and 
publications, the college infirmary, an information center, bowling alleys, a travel 
service, the Community Activities office, and storage area. Its name honors the 
late Dr. Marguerite W. Kehr, who was Dean of Women at the College, 1928 to 
1953. 



Administration and Service Buildings 

Waller Administration Building. This structure, completed in 1972, contains 
administrative offices, vaults, conference rooms, a centralized area for the Busi- 
ness Office and an area for receiving, storing and distributing college supplies and 
equipment. The building is named for D.J. Waller, Jr., who served for twenty- 
seven years as principal of the normal school. 

Francis B. Haas Center for the Arts, completed in 1967, contains a two 
thousand seat auditorium with its stage planned for dramatic productions as well 
as general auditorium purposes. The building also contains classrooms, offices 
and other facilities for music, debating, and drama groups, and lounges and 
exhibit areas. Dr. Francis B. Haas, for whom the auditorium was named, wai 
President of the College from 1927 to 1939. Prior to and subsequent to this pe- 
riod he served as the Pennsylvania State Superintendent of Public Instruction. 

Andruss Library, completed in 1966, contains seating for 750 readers, shelv- 
ing for 200,000 volumes, a projection room, curriculum materials center and an 
audio-visual materials center. It was named for Dr. Harvev A. Andruss, who 
served as President of the College from 1939 to 1969 and who during nine years 
prior to becoming president established the division of business education and 
then served as Dean of Instruction. 

Carver Hall, built in 1867, is the oldest building on the campus. It contains 
a 900-seat auditorium and the office of the President. 

Buckalew House, originally the home of Charles R. Buckalew, United 
States Senator from 1863 to 1869 and trustee of the Normal School, was acquired 
by the Commonwealth for the President's home in 1926. 

Campus Maintenance Center completed in 1970. houses offices, storage 
areas and workshops used by the plant maintenance engineer and his staff. 

Parking Carage. A multi-level concrete structure completed in 1972 accom- 
modates approximate!) 200 cars 



Comim iik Servk es Center J7 

Athletics and Recreation Areas 

Redman Stadium, designed for football and track events, and located on 
the Upper Campus, was completed in 1974. Permanent concrete bleachers on the 
west side provide seating for 4,000 spectators, and movable bleachers on the east 
side increase the total seating capacity to nearly 5,000. There is a press box for 
radio, television and newspaper personnel. An eight-lane, all-weather track and 
specialized areas for field events are part of the field. 

Robert B. Redman, for whom the stadium is named, was assistant dean of 
men and head football and baseball coach from 1947 until 1952. Teams which he 
coached gained state and national recognition. 

Litwhiler Field, a baseball field completed in 1974, is located east of 
Redman Stadium. It was named in honor of Danny Litwhiler, who is currently 
head baseball coach at Michigan State University. Litwhiler, who was coached by 
Dr. E.H. Nelson, starred at Bloomsburg in the late 1930's and played for several 
major league baseball teams prior to beginning his career as a college baseball 
coach at Florida State University. 

Practice Fields. Three practice fields are included in the total athletics com- 
plex on the Upper Campus. One of these is also used for varsity soccer games. 



1.7 BLOOMSBURG FOUNDATION 

The Bloomsburg Foundation was established in 1970 as a non-profit educa- 
tional corporation to assist the College in functions for which state funds should 
not or cannot be used. The Foundation may solicit, receive and manage gifts and 
grants from individuals, corporations, or other foundations; its funds are used to 
assist the College in carrying out its educational mission. 



1.8 COMPUTER SERVICES CENTER 

Bloomsburg State College has made extensive use of computers for more 
than a decade. The Computer Services Center, located in Benjamin Franklin 
Hall, serves the diverse needs of the academic, administrative and research com- 
munities on campus. 

In 1966 the college installed its first computer, an IBM 401. It was replaced 
with a Spectra 70-35 in 1970, and in 1972 the college moved into another 
generation of hardware and purchased a UNIVAC 70/3 with access for ten termi- 
nals. Peripheral to the UNIVAC was a system including six disc drives, four mag- 
netic tape units, two high speed line printers, a card punch and a card reader. 

Increased use of the computer as an instructional, managerial, and research 
tool justified the installation of a UNIVAC 1100-21, a most powerful and ver- 
satile central processing unit with a main memory storage of one million bytes 
(megabyte) or characters of information. This new computer possesses four times 
the memory storage and on-line disk mass storage, and four times faster process- 
ing time than the previous computer. The new system is directly accessible by 
both Center and remote terminals and will support fifty-nine interactive users. 

. Educationally, within many academic programs including the Computer 
and Information Sciences major, students are exposed to the contemporary com- 
puter and the data processing technology of a data-based system, on line inquiry, 
time sharing, program development from a terminal, and dynamically changing 
files. Faculty working directly with the computer have increased time to use com- 
puter assisted instruction material (CAI) such as tutorials, drills and simulations 
to supplement classroom and lab instruction. 

Complete conversion to the new system is scheduled for completion during 
the 1979-80 academic year. 



Fees 39 

2. Expenses, Fees and Refunds 

(Fees are subject to change without notice.) 

2.1 COMMUNITY ACTIVITIES FEE 

A Community Activities Fee of $35.00 per semester is charged each full- 
time undergraduate student. Community Activities fees finance student activities 
in athletics, lectures, student publications, general entertainment, student organi- 
zations, and other student-supported programs. 

2.2 BASIC FEES 

Semester Fees, Full-Time Undergraduate Students 

The basic semester fee for full-time students who are residents of Pennsyl- 
vania is $475.00. An extra fee of $39.00 per semester hour is charged for loads in 
excess of 18 semester hours in any one semester. 

Fees, Part-time Students, Pennsylvania Residents 

Undergraduate students who take fewer than twelve semester hours in a 
semester pay fees of $39.00 per semester hour. 

Fees, Graduate (In-State or Out-of-State) 

Graduate students pay a fee of $475.00 for 9 to 15 semester hours and 
$51.00 per semester hour for loads of less than 9 or in excess of 15 semester 
hours. 

Fees, Out-of-State Undergraduate Students 

Out-of-State undergraduate students pay fees of $890.00 for 12 to 18 
semester hours in one semester and $71.00 per semester hour for loads of less 
than 12 or in excess of 18 semester hours. 

The definition of out-of-state student may be obtained from the Business 
Office. 

Changes in Fees, or Costs 

All fees, or cost, are subject to change without notice. If billing is prior to 
change, student accounts will be charged, or refunded, after the fact. Fees and 
other costs listed in this publication are those in effect, or applicable, on March 
1, 1979. 

Charges for dining hall meals are adjusted annually after the end of the 
academic year. The adjustment under the food service contract currently in force 
is based on the wholesale price index. 

Summer Session Fees 

Undergraduate students pay fees at the rate of $39.00 per semester hour. 
Graduate students pay $51.00 per semester hour. 

These summer fees apply to Pennsylvania residents and out-of-state 
students. 



4o Fees 

2.3 HOUSING FEES 

Residence Halls 

Room and meals in a campus residence hall cost S551 per semester, $210 
for a six-week summer session, and S105 for a three-week summer session. 

The Fall Semester fee is payable before August 15; it may be paid in tuo 
installments, the first before August 15 and the balance before November. 

Keys 

A fee of $15.00 is charged for replacing a lost room key. 

2.4 ADVANCE PAYMENT OF FEES 

An Advance Registration Fee of $50.00 is payable when an individual is 
approved for admission as an undergraduate student or when a former student is 
approved for readmission. This fee is credited to the first basic fee payment. 

The Community Activities Fee for one year ($70.00) is payable when a 
student is approved for admission for the Fall Semester or when a former student 
is approved for readmission after he had been out of school for one or more 
semesters. 

An Advance Housing deposit of $50.00 is required and payable to reserve a 
room and negotiate a housing contract for the academic year. This deposit must 
be paid prior to room assignment and is credited to the housing charge for the 
current semester. This deposit is refundable only under certain conditions ad- 
judged appropriate by the Director of Housing. 

2.5 RULES GOVERNING PAYMENT OF FEES 

Bank drafts, post-office money orders, or checks must be made out for the 
exact amount of the fee. 

Fees other than the Activities Fee are payable to the Commonwealth of 
Pennsylvania; money orders should be drawn on the Post Office at Harrisburg. 

Activities Fees are payable to Community Activities; money orders must be 
drawn on the Post Office at Bloomsburg. 

Fees are due at times determined by the Business Office. 

The College reserves the right to withhold information concerning the 
record of a student who is in arrears in fees or other charges, including student 
loans. 

The College does not offer a time payment plan. Billing statements of 
student accounts are mailed prior to registration each semester. Failure to comply 
with the directive concerning payment excludes the student from registration. 

Inquiries concerning fees may be addressed to the Director of Administra- 
tive and Personnel Services. 

2.6 MEALS FOR OFF-CAMPUS RESIDENTS 

Students who live off campus may take their meals in the dining hall if 
space is available. The rate for 15 meals per week is 1236.50 per semester, and for 
the 20 meals per week is $251 per semester. (See section 2.2 — changes in fees or 
costs). 

Daily Rate for Transients 

The daily rate for transient meals and lodging is: 

Breakfast 51.00 Dinner 1.95 

Lunch 1.25 Room 2.00 

Arrangements for room guests must be approved bv the resident dean of the hall 
where the guest will be housed. 



Rl i i \ds 41 

2.7 MISCELLANEOUS FEES 

Diploma Fees 

A Diploma Fee is charged at graduation as follows: Baccalaureate degree, 
$5.00; Master's degree, $10.00. 

Transcript Fee 

A fee of $1.00 is charged for the second and each subsequent transcript of a 
student's record. 

Late Registration Fee 

A late registration fee of $10.00 is charged a student who completes regis- 
tration after the official registration date. 

Application Fee 

An Application Fee of $10.00 must be paid by each applicant, under- 
graduate and graduate, at the time of request for registration. 

Student Community Building Fee 

A fee of $10.00 per semester is charged for regular sessions; $1.00 for one 
to three weeks summer session, and $2.00 for four to six weeks summer session. 

2.8 REFUND POLICIES 

Application Fee 

The Application Fee ($10) is not refundable. 

Advance Registration Fee 

The Advance Registration Fee ($50) is not refundable. 

Basic Fee 

Fees for tuition are eligible for refunds when the student withdraws from 
college. All refund requests must be submitted in writing to the Business Office, 
Waller Administration Building. A student is eligible for consideration for a 
refund for any reason approved by the President or the President's designated of- 
ficial, or illness certified by a physician. The refund schedule will apply also to all 
part-time students. Except for forfeit of advanced deposits, listed above, refunds 
for basic fees will be based on the following schedule applicable after the first full 
class day: 

1st through 3rd week 4th week 5th week after 5th 

2nd week week 

80% 70% 60% 50% No refund 

Refund schedule for the summer sessions is published in the Summer Session 
catalogue. 

Community Activities Fee 

Freshmen or other new students may apply for a full refund ($70.00) if 
written application is received by the Student Life Accountant, Community 
Activities Office, prior to the beginning of the Fall Semester and if one of the 



M< N >KJ 



Si PP 



following circumstances pertains: withdrawal by the College of the offer of ad- 
mission; induction into the Armed Forces; illness certified by a physician as pre- 
venting enrollment. A partial refund ($35.00) is granted if written application is 
received prior to August 1 for the Fall semester and if reasons other than those 
specified above determine the student's decision not to enroll. 

A refund of S35.00 may be granted if written application is received b\ the 
Student Life Accountant, Community Activities Office prior to registration for 
the Spring semester and if one of the following circumstances pertains: 
withdrawal by the College of the offer of admission; induction into the Armed 
Forces; illness certified by a physician as preventing enrollment. If reasons other 
than those specified above determine the student's decision not to enroll, then a 
refund will not be granted for the Spring semester. 

Other Fee Refunds 

Refund policies for fees not specifically covered in the preceding statements 
are as follows: 

No refunds are made to students who are suspended, dismissed, or who 
withdraw from the College voluntarily. No refunds are made for the $50.00 Hous- 
ing deposit when housing contracts are broken on voluntary withdrawals from 
college. 

In case of personal illness certified to by an attending physician, or in case 
of other reasons which may be approved by the Board of Trustees, refunds of 
housing and contingent fees are prorated and the unused portion subject to 
refund. 

Notice of Withdrawal 

In case of withdrawal, any refunds which are due are computed from the 
date when notice of official withdrawal is received at the Business Office. 



2.9 BOOKS AND SUPPLIES 

Books and supplies are estimated at $75 for each semester. Students ma\ 
secure books and supplies at the College Store. This store is operated on a cash 
basis. 




* 




v ^l 



Financial Aid 43 

3. Student Life And Services 



3.01 INTRODUCTION 

It is desirable for each student to become involved in extra-curricular orga- 
nizations and residence hall programs; these provide opportunities to learn and 
grow as a human being within an atmosphere of a living-learning center. 
Residence hall programming is intended as a framework for emotional, social, 
academic, and personal development; the programs involve dining service, social 
gatherings, cultural events, discussion groups, athletics, judicial proceedings, and 
a variety of student organizations. 

Commuting students are urged to work out travel schedules which permit 
them to spend as much time as possible on campus and to participate in 
activities. 

The educational value of these services depends upon the effort and in- 
volvement of each student, whether resident or commuter. 



3.02 COLLEGE POLICY 

"Bloomsburg State College exists for the transmission of knowledge, the 
pursuit of truth, the development of students, and the general well-being of so- 
ciety. Free inquiry and free expression are indispensable to the attainment of 
these goals. As members of the academic community, students should be en- 
couraged to develop the capacity for critical judgment and to engage in a sus- 
tained and independent search for truth." 

(Quoted from the Pilot, "Joint Statement on Rights, Freedoms, and 
Responsibilities of Students.") 

Students are responsible for the rules, policies, and regulations as stated in 
the Catalogue, Pilot (Student handbook), and the Residence Hall Manuals. The 
Bloomsburg State College Joint Statements on Rights, Freedoms and Responsi- 
bilities of Students has been acknowledged as a guiding principle in the normal 
operation of the College. 



3.03 STUDENT FINANCIAL AID 

All financial aid programs are regulated by the Department of Health, 
Education, and Welfare; PA Higher Education Assistance Agency; and 
Bloomsburg State College policy. Accordingly, it is important to understand that 
a student may lose financial aid by failing to maintain good academic standing 
each semester as prescribed in the Bloomsburg State College Bulletin under Sec- 
tions 5.05 and 5.06 Page 63. 

Financial aid available includes loans, part-time employment, scholarships 
and grants. The Federal and Commonwealth governments fund most of the pro- 
grams. 

Federal programs include College Work-Study, National Direct Student 
Loans, Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants, and Basic Educational 
Opportunity Grants. 

Commonwealth programs include the Pennsylvania State Student Employ- 
ment, the State Guaranty Loans (with Federal subsidy on interest payment for 
certain income levels), and the Pennsylvania State Grant Program. 

The State Guaranty Loans and the State Grants are administered by the 
Pennsylvania Higher Education Assistance Agency (PHEAA). Information may 
be obtained from the Financial Aid Office, counsellors in high schools, or from 
PHEAA regional representatives. To be eligible for payment for summer school 



14 H< ■• ^iNf. 

attendance, a student with a PHEAA grant must have earned 12 semester hours 
during the summer grading period. 

Limited financial assistance is available through the Bloomsburg State 
College Alumni Association loan Program and the Bloomsburg State College 
Scholarships. 

Interest-free emergency student loans of S25 or less for a maximum of 30 
days are available. Application is made at the Community Activities Office. 

Students who wish to take advantage of financial assistance must file a 
PHEAA Composite Financial Aid Application through PHEAA Headquarters in 
Harrisburg. The Financial Aid Office can help students find information and 
solve problems regarding this application. Bucks fur Huskies is a brochure that 
outlines all available financial aid at Bloomsburg State College and also develops 
a financial aid strategy that is useful to both parents and the students attending 
Bloomsburg State College. This brochure is distributed to all students attending 
BSC by the Financial Aid Office. It should be noted that the PHEAA Composite 
Financial Aid Application (which has no processing fee) replaced the College 
Scholarship Service Financial Aid Form (FAF) which was utilized in the past. 

Further information concerning financial aid opportunities and procedures 
for making applications may be obtained at the Financial Aid Office located in 
Room 19 of the Benjamin Franklin Building. 



3.04 STUDENT HOUSING 

On-Campus Residency 

The college provides on-campus living accomodations for approximately 
2,500 students in seven residence halls. The residence halls are described in sec- 
tion 1.6, Buildings and Facilities. 

Although students' housing preferences are considered when possible, the 
College reserves the right to assign rooms and roommates in residence halls. 

Housing and food services are provided only on a combined basis for 
students living in residence halls. Housing and food contracts are binding until 
the end of the academic year and may not be transferred or reassigned. 

Freshmen under 21 years of age are required to reside on campus or com- 
mute from the homes of their parents. If extenuating circumstances justify other 
housing arrangements, a review of those circumstances may be requested. In such 
cases, the Director of Housing is to be consulted. 

Although transfer students may indicate housing preferences, on-campus 
housing is not guaranteed. Transfers who wish to live in the campus residence 
halls should contact the Director of Housing upon acceptance to the collef 

Upper class resident students may continue to live on campus as lor. r 
they satisfy the residence hall eligibility requirements. Any resident student who 
has earned 65 semester hours or less at the completion o\ any Fall semester is eli- 
gible to participate in the lottery for room assignments for the following academic 
year. This policy allows eligibility tor housing through the senior year, but makes 
it highly unlikely that students will be housed on campus during the senior year 
I his eligibility requirement is subject to revision as the demand for on-campiM 
COmodations changes. 

Details about residence hall rules and regulations are printed in the Pilot. 
residence hall manuals, the Icrnis and Condition* , and other b 

ing literature. 

Off-Campus Residency 

I he College does not approve or recommend residences off campus; 
therefore, all accomodations in this category are considered "independent." 
However, the Housing Office does serve as b referral agency, collecting data 



Community Governmeni Association 4*> 

about off-campus housing opportunities, preparing housing directories, and pro- 
viding other useful information to student tenants and their landlords. Before any 
rental property is accepted for listing in the college's off-campus directory, the 
owner must submit his/her premises to an annual inspection by the town building 
inspector and must sign a statement pledging not to practice illegal discrimination 
in the rental of property. In addition, the property must meet the town's building 
code requirements and comply with housing standards set forth by the Pennsyl- 
vania Department of Labor and Industry. 

Because off-campus housing is not assigned the student must rely upon his/ 
her own initiative to find suitable off-campus accomodations. 

The College does not become involved in the tenant-landlord relationship, 
except when the Housing Director is called upon by either party to enhance com- 
munications or understanding between the two. All involvement by the Housing 
Director and any advice given is purely an informal, non-legal basis. 

Students planning to live off campus should have a clear understanding of 
their rights and responsibilities as tenants. To help students become more 
knowledgeable tenants, the Housing Office prepares information on topics of 
interest to off-campus renters. Brochures and pamphlets are available on such 
subjects as security deposits, leases, discrimination, food stamps, nutrition, fire 
safety in the home, model rental contracts, home repairs and energy conservation. 
Street maps of the town of Bloomsburg, pre-occupancy checklists, office copies of 
the local housing code and Pennsylvania Department of Labor and Industry 
regulations, and articles on reading and understanding leases are also available to 
interested students. Upon request, the Director of Housing will help student 
renters conduct pre and post-occupancy inventories of their apartments/ rooms or 
serve as an impartial observer for alleged violations of the building code or other 
ordinances. 

Off-campus students are advised to obtain insurance protection for their 
belongings, since most landlords do not assume liability for loss of, or damage to, 
the personal property of their tenants. 

Students residing off campus bear a dual responsibility as citizens of the 
town of Bloomsburg and as members of the college community. The college can- 
not provide sanctuary from the law nor can it be indifferent to its reputation in 
the community it serves. 

3.05 COMMUNITY GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION 

All full-time undergraduate students are members of the Association. 
Graduate students and full-time faculty members who have paid their Community 
Activities Fee are also members. College Council meetings are held Monday even- 
ings in the Multi-purpose room of the Kehr Union. The executive council, which 
consists of the officers and two council representatives, meets on the alternate 
Monday evening of the month. 




4/. Oki.wi/ \IK.ss 



3.06 STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS AND ACTIVITIES 



3.06.1 ORGANIZA I IONS 

Students arc encouraged tO ta 
per semester I he approved student 
Alliance tor Student Voters 
Amateur Radio Club 
toenail Chemical Society 
Appalachian Marketing C lub 
I he American Societ) tor Personnel 

Administration 

Association lor Childhood Education 

International 
ciation oi Resident Students 
Biolog) Club 
Rioomsburg Players 

BSC Student Art Association 

Campus Voice 

Cheerleaders 

Chess Club 

Circuolo Italian Club 

College Community Orchestra 

Circle K 

College Union Program Roard 
'College Union Governing Roard 

Columbia Hall 
'Community Government Association 

Community Arts Council 
♦Commuters Association 
'Commonwealth Association of Student 

Concert Choir 

Council for Exceptional Children 

Earth Science Club 

Economics Club 

Fellowship ol Christian Athletes 

Fiddlers Green 

Forensic Society 
•freshman Class 

German Club 

Horticultural Club 

Humanities Club 

Husk\ Singers 

Intercollegiate Bowling Club 

Inter-Varsity Christian Fellowship 

International Relations Club 

Jewish Fellowship 
•Junior Class 

Karate Club 



kc part in at least one extra-curricular activity 

organizations are: 

■ call 

I u/erne Hall 
Madrigal Singers 
Man ( Man & Nature) 

ton and Cold Hand 
Mathematics Club 
Montour Residence Hall 
Music Educators National Conference 
Newman Student Association 
V rthumberland Hall 
Obiter 
Oil-Campus Students Association 

Olympian 

Orthodox Christian Fellowship 
Outing Club 
Phi Beta Lambda 
Philosophy Club 
Psychology Association 
Radio Station 
Russian Club 
Sailing Club 
•Senior Class 
Ski Club 

Society of Physics Students 
s \Sophomore Class 

Sociology Club 
Spanish Club 

Student Speech & Hearing Association 
Student PSEA 
Studio Band 

Students International Mediation Society 
Student Nursing Association 
Table Tennis Club 
Third World Culture Society 
Veterans Association 
The Way, Campus Outreach 
Weightlifting Club 
Womens Choral Ensemble 
Womens Recreation Association 
^ oung Democrats 
Young Republicans 
Youth C.A.R.C 



•These organizations serve large consti- 
tuencies. 



3.06.2 PUBUCAT/ONS 

Students who are interested in journalism have an opportunity to join the 

Staffs ol the student publications and to take courses which lead to a Certificate 
in Journalism. 

rhrough this activity, a student can contribute significant!) to campus life 
and at the same tunc gam valuable experience for future work in either com- 
mercial or school journalism. 

Requirements tor the Certificate m Journalism are given in Chapter 7. 



\ n \ ii km i us, Sokoki I ii s 47 



CAMPUS VOICE 



The college paper, published twice weekly, is regarded as the official 
student voice on campus. It is funded by the CGA budget and distributed free to 
the college community. 

OBITER 

This is the college annual pictorial publication of the activities of the year. 
It is funded by the CGA and is distributed free to members of the Senior class. 
Other members of the college community may purchase copies. 

OLYMPIAN 

The annual publication provides an outlet for literary expression in the 
fields of poetry and prose. 

PILOT 

The official student handbook is edited by students under the supervision 
of the Vice President for Student Life. It contains essential information about 
student life and services. 

TODAY 

A daily publication from the Office of the Director of Student Activities 
and College Union announces activities and meetings, and carries news of organi- 
zations and departments. 

THIS WEEK 

A weekly publication from the Office of the Student Activities and College 
Union announces special activities planned by the College. 

3.06.3 HONOR AND PROFESSIONAL SOCIETIES 

National honor and professional societies foster educational ideas through 
scholarship, social activities, and moral development. Campus chapters are: 

Alpha Phi Gamma Phi Kappa Phi 

Alpha Psi Omega Phi Sigma Pi 

Delta Mu Delta Phi Alpha Theta 

Delta Phi Alpha Pi Kappa Delta 

Gamma Theta Upsilon Pi Omega Pi 

Kappa Delta Pi Psi Chi 

Kappa Kappa Psi Sigma Tau Delta 

Kappa Mu Epsilon Tau Beta Sigma 
Omicron Delta Epsilon 

3.06.4 SOCIAL FRATERNITIES AND SORORITIES 

The Inter-Fraternity Council (IFC) serves as the governing body of the nine 
social fraternities, and coordinates rushing, pledging, and programming. The 
fraternities, with dates of organizations, are: 



national September 1970 



Beta Sigma Delta 
Delta Omega Chi 
Delta Pi 


1966 
1965 
1967 


Kappa Alpha Psi 
Lambda Chi Alpha 


Probationary 
1967 


Phi Sigma Xi 


1966 


Sigma Iota Omega 
Tau Kappa Epsilon 
Zeta Psi 


1964 

Probationary 

1966 



national September 1969 



4* Si RVICES 

I he Inter-Sororitj council (ISC) is composed ol representative! of the 

seven social sororities. I he Council coordinates the rushing and pledging 
activities and endeavors to enhance friendship and social relations between 
sororities and individual Women. I he group consists of 



Alpha k.ipp.i Alpha 


Probationary 




Alpha Sigma I an 


National Colony 




Alpha Sigma Alpha 


National Colons 


Probationary 


Chi Sigma Rho 


1967 




Delia I psiion Beta 


1966 




Phi lota (hi 


1974 




Sigma Sigma Sigma 


1967 




lau Sigma l'i 


1967 




I beta I a u Ornega 


I96S 





national November 1971 



3.06.5 SERVICE ERA TERNITIES AND SORORITIES 

These organizations are dedicated to providing service to the campus and 
community at large. Alpha Phi Omega (1963) is open to any second semester 
freshman male with a 2.0 or higher average. Lambda Alpha Mu (1964) is open to 
any second semester freshman woman with a 2.0 or higher cumulative average. 

3.06.6 KEHR COLLEGE UNION 

The Kehr College Union contains the following facilities: Ground Floor - 
bank, games area, bowling alley, post office, formal lounge, television rooms, and 
locker rooms; First Floor — snack bar, multipurpose rooms, health center, in- 
formation desk, duplicating room, typing room, and administrative offices; 
Second Floor — offices for student organizations, student publications' offices, 
radio station, study lounge and/ or coffee house, conference rooms, listening 
room, and Community Activities Office. 

The Program Board plans the activities held in the Union; the College 
Union Governing Board authorizes policies and procedures for the use of the 
building. 

3.07 SERVICES 
Dining Room 

The William W. Scranton Commons contains two main dining rooms 
which can be partitioned to provide a total of four dining areas seating 250 each. 
Food services are furnished by a professional food service contractor. 

Off-campus students may apply to purchase meal tickets at the Grants Of- 
fice Room 39, Waller Administration Building. 

The transfer, misuse, or falsification of a meal ticket is reason for College 
disciplinary and legal action. 

Members of the College community may eat in the College Commons at 
published transient rates, or they may be served, restaurant-style, in the all-college 
dining room, which is open Monday through Friday tor lunch. 

Croup meals are available to campus organizations; these may be arranged 
through the Grants Office subject to approval of the Business office, 48 hours in 
advance ot the event. Banquets and parties tor outside groups may be reserved by 
the same procedure 30 days in advance. 

There is a Snack Bar in the Kehr Union Building which serves snacks and 
light meals to students, members ot the College community, and visitors to the 
campus. 

College Health Center 

I he College Health Center is located on the first floor of the Kehr Union 
Building. All students seeking health care or counseling about a health problem 



Si k\ k i s 49 

should report to the Health Center between the hours of 7:00 a.m. to 11:30 p.m. 
Monday through Friday. When the Health Center is closed, students living on 
campus may obtain health assistance from the Resident Advisor or the Dean of 
the building. Students living off campus may report directly to the Bloomsburg 
Hospital Dispensary when the Health Center is closed. 

The College Health Center is staffed by a registered nurse and serves as a 
walk-in clinic at no expense to the student. At the request of a student, phy- 
sicians' appointment may be made by the nurse on duty. Physician's fees and 
other medical expenses are the responsibility of the student or parent/ guardian. 

Ambulance Service 

Ambulance service paid for by the Community Government Association is 
available to students of the College. Students may benefit from this service while 
living on campus, in off-campus housing, or if an accident occurs within a 
reasonable distance of the College. See the Pilot for instructions for calling an 
ambulance. 

Student Insurance 

An accident and sickness insurance policy is offered to students, on a 
voluntary basis, with coverage up to $1,000. Both full-time undergraduate and 
graduate students may take advantage of the service. Each accident is subject to a 
$25 deductible for medical expenses incurred. Each sickness will be covered on an 
allocated basis i.e. specific amounts for Hospital Room, Surgical Operations, up 
to $10 per visit to the physician starting with the second visit, etc. Expenses will 
be covered 52 weeks from the date of the first treatment and are in effect 24 
hours a day, for 12 months. 

Athletic Insurance 

All students participating in intercollegiate sports have insurance coverage 
up to $10,000 paid for by the College. Athletic insurance covers injuries arising 
while practicing for, playing, and traveling as a member of an athletic team but 
does not cover injuries sustained in intramural sports or other injuries or illnesses. 
A $90,000 catastrophe policy is available as a reserve measure. 

Counseling 

The Counseling Center makes available the services of four professionally 
trained counselors. Services of the Center are available to any regularly enrolled 
student with problems of educational, vocational, personal, social, or emotional 
concern. 

Students should ask for help without hesitation when a problem adversely 
affects their education. All contacts are confidential. 

The Counseling Center is located on the top floor of the Benjamin Franklin 
Building. Appointments may also be made by telephoning 389-3718. 

Banking 

A full service branch of the Bloomsburg Bank-Columbia Trust Co. is 
located on the ground floor of the Kehr Union Building. The services available to 
faculty, staff, and students include conventional checking and savings accounts, 
money orders and Treasurer's checks, Christmas clubs, Vacation clubs, Traveler's 
checks, repayment of loans and handling P.P.&L. and Pa. Gas & Water Co. bills. 

The hours are as follows: Monday and Tuesday: 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.; 
Wednesday: 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. and 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.; Thursday: 10:00 
a.m. to 4:00 p.m.; and Friday: 10:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. Closed weekends. 



50 ( \KIIH Dm I OPM1 M. f>| \i I MJ M 

College Store 

I he College Store sells books and supplies needed during the year; it is 
open trom K:(X) a.m. to 7:55 p.m. on Monday, 8:00 a.m. until 4:30 p.m. on Tues- 
day through Friday and from 8:30 a.m. until noon on Saturdav 

College Post Office 

Mail is delivered to campus residence halls once daily, Monday through 
Friday. A central post office in Kehr Union provides combination boxes for off- 
campus students. 

The Community Arts Council 

The Community Arts Council is supported by the Community Government 
Association. The Council consists of twenty members with equal membership of 
students and faculty, a community representative, and the Director of Cultural 
Affairs. 

The Community Arts Council sponsors programs in the performing arts, 
lectures, and artists-in-residence. These events are without charge to faculty and 
students who purchase a Community Activity card. Area residents who purchase 
Community Patron cards are also admitted to cultural events free. A Cultural Af- 
fairs schedule is published each fall and spring. A monthly newsletter is sent to all 
patrons of the Community Arts Council. 

Haas Gallery of Art 

Works of art are exhibited throughout the year in the Haas Gallery under 
the direction of the Department of Art. Exhibitions are held monthly and a spe- 
cial exhibition of student work is held annually. 

Permanent Art Collection 

The department of art maintains a permanent art collection with works 
displayed throughout the campus. 

Speech, Hearing and Language Clinic 

This Clinic, located in Navy Hall, provides a number of services to 
students, faculty, staff and total community. Evaluative services are available in 
speech, voice, language, hearing, and educational-psychological services. Thera- 
peutic services offered are speech and language therapy, auditory training, speech 
reading, educational therapy, and parent counseling. Services of the Clinic are 
free to Bloomsburg State College students, faculty and staff. 

Career Development and Placement Center 

The Career Development and Placement Center offers career counseling 
and planning services to all Bloomsburg undergraduate, graduate, continuing 
education students, and alumni. In addition to individual career counseling, an 
up-to-date Career Laboratory, containing printed materials and audiovisual 
equipment, is available to students who are planning their individual career op- 
tions I he Career Development and life Planning Course, offered by the Educa- 
tional Studies and Services Department, provides a unique opportunity for under- 
classmen in particular to become actively involved in the Career Development 
process Career information and job hunting seminars, workshops, and programs 
sponsored bv the Center are held throughout the year 

Seniors and alumni are invited to Utilize the placement services offered by 
the Center. Placement hies established by registrants are distributed to potential 
employers Campus interviews tor seniors and vacancv lists help to keep job 
hunters abreast ot trends in the employment market. 



QUES1 AND Ann i i k s 51 

Veterans' Office 

An office for veterans is maintained in Benjamin Franklin Building by 
veterans who are full time students to assist veterans with personal problems, 
especially those related to housing, employment, health, recreation, vocational 
and technical training and financial assistance, and to provide liaison with other 
administrative offices. The Office of Veterans' Affairs is under the direction of 
The School of Extended Programs. Required reports to the Veterans' Administra- 
tion are sent from the Registrar's Office. 

3.08 QUEST 

A program of outdoor pursuits in education has been developed under the 
title QUEST. Its activities aim to encourage characteristics such as responsibility, 
leadership, self-confidence, trust, loyalty, initiative, self-discipline, and sensitivity 
through personal experiences in field trips, field study, and certain types of 
experiential education away from campus. Certain of the experiences may be 
designed to permit cooperating departments to offer academic credit to students 
who participate. Participation is not confined to college students, but may include 
faculty and other individuals from a wide range of ages. 

The actual activities offered to accomplish the QUEST objectives are: rock 
climbing, backpacking, canoeing, sky diving, hang gliding, rafting, bicycling, cross 
country skiing, along with exposures to new cultures within our society. Equip- 
ment for most of the activities is available at no cost to the participants. There is 
also a special five-day outdoor experience offered to all incoming freshmen 
students in conjunction with their summer orientation program which is called 
"Up Reach." 

3.09 ATHLETICS, INTRAMURALS, RECREATION 

The College is a member of the National Collegiate Athletic Association, 
The Eastern College Athletic Conference, The Pennsylvania State Athletic 
Conference, The Eastern Wrestling League, The Association for Intercollegiate 
Athletics for Women and The Eastern Association for Intercollegiate Athletics for 
Women. 




OMOBII ES 

I he intercollegiate program includes: baseball, basketball, cross country. 
football, golf, soccer, swimming, tennis, track and wrestling tor men; basketball. 
held hockey, gymnastics, lacrosse, Softball, swimming, tennis and tracks for 
women 

Intramural sports tor men include: archer), baseball, tennis, tracl 
country, horseshoes, soccer, water polo, weight training, sottball. basketball, tabic 
tennis, volleyball, wrestling, gymnastics, golf, handball, racquetball and straight 
pool. 

Intramural sports open to all women students are planned to promote wide 
participation intended to foster a spirit of sportsmanship. Activities include: 
volleyball, cageball, basketball, teniquoit, badminton, shuttleboard. table tennis, 
sottball. archery, horseshoes and soccer. 

Athletic facilities are made available for recreational use bv students when 
not occupied tor instruction, intercollegiate athletics or intramurals. 

3.10 AUTOMOBILE REGISTRATION 

Operation of a motor vehicle on the college campus is a privilege explained 
in Motor Vehicle Regulations Manual available in the Office ot Safet) and 
cunt v. 

All staff, facility, evening division students, graduate students, students over 
21 years of age, students who are veterans attending under the G.I. Bill, non- 
resident students. Juniors and Seniors must register any motor vehicle the) drive 
on the campus. Parking decals are to be obtained at the Safety and Secuntv 
fice within 24 hours after employment, registration, or arrival on campus. Failure 
to adhere to this provision will result in a S5.00 penalty. Students mav obtain 
only one valid decal at a time; however, emergency situations may warrant 
issuance of a temporary permit. There is no cost for decals. 

Freshmen and sophomores living on campus are not eligible to operate 
and or park a motor vehicle on the campus unless given special permission. 

Moving violations such as failing to obey stop signs, driving against traffic 
on a one-way street, reckless driving and driving too fast for conditions are 
chargeable under the Pennsylvania Motor Vehicle Code. 

3.11 STUDENT GRIEVANCE POLICY 

A Student-Faculty Judicial and Grievance Committee shall investigate and 
make recommendations on alleged administrative, instructional, or student orga- 
nization injustices. It will hear cases after normal recourse tor grievances has been 
exhausted, hour faculty members and four students are voting members, and the 
Dean of Student Life and the appropriate Academic Dean serve as non-voting, l I 
officio members. I he committee mav dismiss a case adjudged lacking merit or 
recommend a solution to a substantiated grievance to the appropriate \ 
President. 

3.12 REPRESENTATIVE ASSEMBLY 

I he Representative \sscmblv seeks to apply the principle of collegiahty to 
college governance. It is an organization ot students, faculty, administrative of- 
ficers and support staff, elected bv their peers, to facilitate dialogue, improve 
communications, and promote increased participation of the college community 

m policy-making. 

I he Assembly serves as a forum tor the discussion of college matters, a 
framework tor the maintenance ot a co-ordinated committee system, and an orga- 
nization to recommend college policies. Si\ standing committees, academic af- 
fairs, general administration, college lite, campus ki vices, human relations, and 
planning coordinate the work ol several sub-committees au<A report regularlv to 

the Assembly. 



AlMM [CATION 53 



4. Admission And Readmission 



4.01 INSTRUCTIONS FOR CORRESPONDENCE 

Correspondence concerning admission and documents which pertain to ad- 
mission should be addressed to: 
Dean of Admissions 
Bloomsburg State College 
Bloomsburg, Pa. 17815 



4.02 APPLICATION PROCEDURES 

Application materials and instructions for application may be secured by 
writing the Dean of Admissions. 

To be a candidate for admission, one must complete and submit an official 
application to the Office of Admissions. The applicant is responsible for request- 
ing the proper official of his/her secondary school to submit a transcript and per- 
sonal evaluation to the Dean of Admissions. 

The non-refundable application fee of ten dollars must be paid prior to 
consideration of the application. 

Freshman applicants may apply to the college in only one of three 
academic categories: General Studies, Business, or Nursing. The level of competi- 
tion for available positions in the latter two categories requires identification at 
the time of admission of individuals interested in pursuing these programs. 
Otherwise, applicants to other programs at the college will indicate their cur- 
riculum preference after enrollment. Students not admitted to Business or Nurs- 
ing upon acceptance to the college are not guaranteed transfer to these curricula 
upon enrollment. 



4.03 CRITERIA FOR EVALUATION 

Admission to Bloomsburg State College is determined by the applicant's 
academic and personal qualifications. Decisions are reached without regard to 
race, color, creed, national origin, sex or physical handicap. 

Applicants other than those eligible under Section 4.06 must be graduates 
of or seniors in accredited secondary schools or must have secondary school equi- 
valency as determined by the Credentials Evaluation Division of the Pennsylvania 
Department of Education. 

Acceptance is determined by the Dean of Admissions upon evaluation of 
secondary school preparation, achievement, scores on the Scholastic Aptitude 
Test, personal characteristics, and institutional capacity. 

Acceptances are tentative if based on evaluation of transcripts which show 
work in progress; final action is taken after complete transcripts have been 
received and evaluated. 



4.04 ENTRANCE TEST 

Applicants must have on file scores of the Scholastic Aptitude Test of the 
College Entrance Examination Board. It is the responsibility of applicants to ar- 
range for the test and to request the forwarding of the scores directly from the 
Educational Testing Service. A photostatic copy of the high school test report on 
an official high school transcript is also acceptable. No other standardized test 
will serve as a substitute for the Scholastic Aptitude Test. 



54 Ikvsmik 

4.05 CENTER FOR ACADEMIC DEVELOPMENT 

The goal ot the program of the Center tor Aeademie Development is to 
equalize educational opportunity tor students regardless of ethnic background or 
economic status. 

Any individual with a high school diploma or certificate of equivalent 
eligible to appl\ for admission to the program. Non-traditional criteria arc 
plied in estimating potential oi applicants when it appears that the environmental 
background mav have adverselv affected grades and or standardized te^' 
I"he Dean ol Admissions mav require an applicant for the Center for Academic 
IX'velopment to tile supplementary information as is needed for proper considera- 
tion. 

Opportunities for financial aid are described in a brochure which ma> be 
secured from the Office of Financial Aid. (See Section 3.03.) 

Students in the program of the Center are required to participate in a sum- 
mer developmental program prior to the first semester of their attendance and 
receive tutoring and special counseling for academic, financial and social prob- 
lems. 

Inquiries should be sent to the Director of the Center for Academic 
Development or to the Dean of Admissions. 

4.06 EARLY ADMISSION 

Outstanding high school students may be considered for admission upon 
completion of grade 11. In addition to strong achievement and high aptitude, ap- 
plicants for early admission must have the unqualified endorsement of the high 
school to receive consideration. College credit earned may apply toward the re- 
quirements for the high school diploma. 

4.07 TRANSFER STUDENTS 

An applicant who has ever been enrolled, or who at the time of application 
is enrolled, in another college or university is a transfer applicant. 

The information supplied in section 4.02, Application Procedures, and 4.03. 
Criteria for Evaluation, applies to transfer applicants. American College Test 
results may be submitted by a transfer applicant instead of the Scholastic Ap- 
titude Test results, except that test results are not required from applicants who 
have successfully completed 30 or more semester hours of college credit. Transfer 
applicants must request each college attended to send an official transcript to the 
Dean of Admissions, regardless of whether credit was earned. 

In order for a transfer student to be considered for admission, he she must 
be certified as in good standing academically and otherwise in the college last at- 
tended and must have a quality point average of 2.0 or better on a 4.0 system for 
all courses in which passing and or failing grades were recorded. 

4.08 CAMPUS VISITS 

Personal interviews are welcomed but not required. Arrangements can be 
made tor an interview by writing or calling the Office of Admissions (717-38&- 
3316). Applicants should bring an unofficial high school transcript if an applica- 
tion is not on file Personal interviews are available Monday through Friday, B:30 
a.m. to 4:00 p.m. 

A number ot campus visitation days are held during the academic year. Vi- 
sitation dayi consist ot a general meeting with Admissions personnel, students, 
and administrative personnel including a question-and-answcr session — a 

tour ot the campus, lunch, and academic department meetings Participation in 
one ot these visitation days mav be more meaningful than a personal interview 
because applicants have the opportunity to meet directly with academic faculty in 



R] ADMISSION, LEAV] Ql AbSENI I 55 

the departments of their interest. Specific information and dates arc available 
upon request from the Dean of Admissions. 

4.09 OFF CAMPUS VISITATIONS 

Each year, the staff in the Office of Admissions visits high schools and 
community colleges throughout Pennsylvania, participating in approximately 70 
college night/ career day programs, and the Philadelphia and Pittsburgh College 
Fair programs. Prospective applicants are encouraged to check with their high 
school or community college counselors to determine if an Admissions 
representative will be visiting their institution or attending a nearby college night 
program. 

4.10 NON-DEGREE 

Admissions procedures for undergraduate non-degree credit study are out- 
lined in Chapter 10. 

4.11 READMISSION OF FORMER STUDENTS 

Students who, having been formally admitted to degree study and attended 
Bloomsburg State College, fail to enroll or withdraw for any academic semester, 
regardless of the reason, must apply for readmission if they wish to re-enter. 

Readmitted students are responsible for the graduation requirements and 
academic policies which exist at the time of reentrance. 

The Dean of Admissions may require an applicant for readmission to file a 
letter containing such supplementary information as is needed for proper 
consideration. 

Students under academic dismissal are ineligible for consideration for read- 
mission for one calendar year; they should present evidence of successful achieve- 
ment at another college or university as part of any application for readmission. 

The grade and credit-entries recorded prior to readmission of a student 
under academic dismissal do not enter into subsequent computations of the 
quality point average, but the previous credit is included in his/her cumulative 
credit. A student may invoke this provision only once. Courses failed prior to dis- 
missal and repeated after readmission are not subject to the repeat provisions out- 
lined in (Sections 5.01 and 5.03). 

4.12 LEAVE OF ABSENCE 

A student may request a leave of absence for a specified period by complet- 
ing the appropriate forms at the Office of Admissions. To be eligible for a leave, 
a student must be in Academic Good Standing and must request the leave prior 
to the registration date of the intended period of absence. 

A student on a leave of absence is assured a place in the semester 
designated for return provided the instructions that are part of the leave of 
absence agreement are fulfilled and advanced deposits are submitted at the time 
designated by the Dean of Admissions. 

4.13 HEALTH RECORD 

An applicant who is offered admission must submit a medical history ques- 
tionnaire prior to enrollment. The appropriate medical questionnaire is forwarded 
to the applicant upon receipt of advanced fees. Nursing students must submit a 
medical examination in lieu of the medical questionnaire. 

Final permission to enroll is contingent upon a favorable review of the 
medical history by the College Physician. 



\ » \si 1 I) Pi \< I Ml s I 



4.14 ADVANCED PLACEMENT 

A student mav receive a maximum total of 30 semester hours of credit bv 
examination tor successful completion of institutional examinations and or ap- 
proved external examinations. The college recognizes two external exam;- 
programs: the College I e\el Examination Program (CLEP) and the Ad'- 

Placement Program of the College Entrance F.xamination Board. 

I he minimum score tor awarding credit tor general CLEP examinations is 
the 50th percentile ol the Sophomore national norms. Credit is awarded for the 
subject CI EP examinations tor achievement at or above the mean score achieved 
by students in the national norm sample who earned the grade of "C" in a regular 
college course in the subject. Minimum scores for awarding credit and the 
amount of credit granted can be secured by writing the Dean of Admissions 

A score of 5 or 4 on an Advanced Placement examination exempts a 
student from the introductory course in the tested area and gives credit. A score 
ol 3 exempts a student, without credit, from the introductory course. Advanced 
placement is not granted for grades of 2 or I. 

Advanced placement may be granted in English Composition after 
consideration of verbal SAT, the Test of Standard Written English results and 
high school achievement. 



4.15 ADVANCED STANDING FOR MILITARY 

SERVICE EDUCATIONAL EXPERIENCES 

The recommendations of the American Council on Education as stated in 
its Guide to Evaluation are followed. The applicability of such credit to the re- 
quirements of the student's curriculum is determined by recommendation of the 
dean of the school and confirmation by the Vice-President for Academic Affairs. 
USAFI courses validated through college-level examinations are subject to the 
provisions for acceptance of correspondence courses. 



4.16 INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION 

Residents of foreign countries should initiate their application well in ad- 
vance of the semester they plan to enroll. Special application forms are required 
and may be obtained by writing to the Dean of Admissions. Students whose na- 
tive language is other than English are required to submit the results of the Test 
of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) Examination administered by the 
Educational Testing Service, Princeton, New Jersey 08540. Certificates o\ educa- 
tional training should be accompanied by certified translations if they are 
presented in a language other than English. Brief course descriptions o\ subjects 
successfully completed should be included with credentials. 

Students may participate in a variety o\ study abroad programs during 
their enrollment at Bloomsburg State College. Each summer the college offers 
courses tor credit in foreign countries, such as France, England, Spain. Ireland, 
and the Soviet Union. As a member of the Pennsylvania Consortium for Interna- 
tional Education, Bloomsburg also offers summer courses in Sal/burg. Austria, 
and Mexico, in cooperation with the other 13 state colleges and universitv 
Through the Pennsylvania Consortium for International Education, the college 
also makes arrangements tor Junior Year Abroad programs or Semester Abroad 
programs. Information about these programs may be obtained m the Office o\ 

International Education. 

Students in teacher education programs mav be assigned to do their student 
teaching in one ot the centers abroad with which Bloomsburg cooperates: in 
Quito. Ecuador; Recite. Brazil; or I iverpool, England. Further information about 
this program mav be obtained m the Office o\ International Education. 



Registration ^7 

5. Academic Policies And Practices 



Academic policies and practices are subject to change; the policies of this 
chapter are those authorized as of January 1, 1979. If there are subsequent 
changes which are effective for 1979-80, insofar as possible these will be an- 
nounced in the Pilot; changes made after publication of the Pilot are announced 
in the Campus Voice. 



5.01 REGISTRATION POLICIES AND PRACTICES 

Student Responsibility 

It is the responsibility of the student to know and observe the academic 
policies and regulations of the College, to confine registration to courses for 
which the prerequisites have been satisfied and to meet the requirements for 
graduation. 

In case of changes by the College in graduation or curriculum require- 
ments, a full-time student who attends without interruption may choose to satisfy 
either the requirements as they existed at the time of entrance or the new require- 
ments; in the latter case, the student is responsible for the requirements in toto. A 
student who withdraws from the College for one or more semesters must apply 
for readmission. A readmitted student is governed in this matter by the rules for 
readmission (see Section 4.11). A part-time student must apply to the Vice 
President for Academic Affairs for permission to be graduated under the original 
requirements. 

Academic Advisement 

Entering students who upon application for admission indicated their 
preferred curriculum are assigned to faculty advisers who specialize in advisement 
in these areas. Assignments to advisers are made by the Coordinator of Academic 
Advisement with advice of department chairpersons and deans. 

Applicants for admission who are undecided about their curriculum should 
state undecided on the application for admission instead of specifying a cur- 
riculum. 

Students with questions or problems should seek assistance in the Office of 
Academic Advisement, Benjamin Franklin Building. 

Scheduling 

Scheduling of classes for students already in attendance is completed during 
the prior semester. Students obtain a schedule booklet at no cost from the 
College Store and follow the instructions in it. 

Students beginning or readmitted into degree programs may schedule 
classes in accordance with the instructions accompanying the offer of admission. 

Registration 

A student completes registration before attending classes. Registration is 
the student's official notification to the college of his or her enrollment for the 
term and is held the first day of the term. Students may register late until the 
close of business on the second Friday after a semester's registration or the first 
Wednesday following a summer session registration. There is a fee for late regis- 
tration unless the student presents a legitimate medical excuse. 



iiidi i \ Changes 

\ time schedule tor student registration is sent to each student with the 
semester billing. limes tor summer sessions registration are announced in the 
summer sessions brochure. 

Change of Schedule 

A student mav change his her semester schedule prior to the close of the 
fifth dav ol classes o! the semester. Application tor change is made to the 
Registrar on a form which may be secured at the schedule change area. The 
content ol the Bdviier is not prerequisite to a change, but the student is responsi- 
ble tor informing the adviser ot the change. Changes are subject to available 
space in classes to which the student proposes to transfer. Students mav attend 
classes in accordance with an amended schedule only alter certification b> the 
Registrars Office that the change has been executed officially. 

Transfer of Curriculum 

A student who wishes to transfer from one curriculum to another must file 
a request in the Academic Advisement Office. The filing of this request must be 
completed before the end of the semester preceding the proposed transfer, 
preferably before the scheduling period. 

Permission to enter the new curriculum may require approval of the dean 
of the school in which it is offered; in this case, approval will depend on available 
space and may depend on recommendations from advisers and counselors. 

Withdrawal from a Course 

A student is permitted to withdraw from a course at any time prior to the 
last week of classes for the semester, in accordance with the following procedures 
and regulations: 

A withdrawal application form is secured from the Registrar's Office. The 
student has withdrawn when the completed form has been filed with the 
Registrar. 

The grade upon withdrawal is determined by the following policy: If the 
date of withdrawal is prior to the close of the fifth day of classes following the 
date established as the end of the first half of the semester, the grade of W tl 
reported. If a student withdraws subsequent to that date, the grade of WP is 
reported if the student is currently passing on the withdrawal date as certified by 
the Registrar, with the grade of WF required if the student is failing the course. 
In case a student had been absent for a prolonged period prior to the withdrawal 
date, with the absence reliably confirmed as due to causes beyond his her control, 
the Vice President for Academic Affairs, upon request of the student, will direct 
the instructor to make the grade retroactive to the first day of absence due to this 
cause rather than to the date of withdrawal. 

If a student discontinues attending class without completing official 
withdrawal, the grade of E is reported. Absence from the final examination 
without confirmation that it was caused by circumstances beyond the student's 
control is regarded as discontinuing attendance without official withdrawal. 

Withdrawal from the College 

A student may withdraw from the College bv securing an official 
withdrawal form from the counseling center and completing and filing it as 
directed. The withdrawal process includes the clearing of all financial obligation*, 
an exit interview with the director o\ Financial Aid, and the return o\ the ED card 
and meal ticket. Grades are given in accordance with the policy stated under 
"Withdrawal from I Course." An individual who discontinues attendance without 
completing the official withdrawal process and clearing o\ all obligations to the 
college waives the right to a transcript and is denied future readmission. 

Policies which cover reimbursements are stated in Sect urn 2 y 



Pass-Fau 59 

Pass-Fail Registration and Rules 

After attaining sophomore standing, a degree student may elect courses on 
a Pass-Fail basis until the final day of registration in accordance with the follow- 
ing rules: 

A maximum of four courses (not more than 13 semester hours in total) 
may be included as part of the minimum graduation requirement of 128 semester 
hours. 

The courses must be electives in disciplines of the arts and sciences beyond 
the requirements of the student's specialization. Specialization includes a major 
and any courses required in conjunction with the major. Suitable courses outside 
the specialization taken on Pass-Fail basis may be applied toward the General 
Education requirements. (See Section 6.4.) 

No more than two courses may be taken on this plan in any semester or 
summer term. 

The instructor is not informed that the course is being taken on a pass-fail 
basis; grades of A, B, C, D, or E are translated later into grades of P or F, with 
the grade of P recorded for a grade of D or higher and the grade F recorded for 
E. 

The grades P and F do not enter into the computation of a quality point 
average. 

If, subsequent to completion of a course on a Pass-Fail basis, the student 
should change his/her major to one in which the instructor's original grade is re- 
quired, he/ she may request that the chairperson of the academic department be 
notified of the actual letter grade earned. 

A student who has received a grade of E in a course may not take it later 
on a Pass-Fail basis. 

The student may not revoke a decision to take a course on a pass-fail basis. 

Normal Load and Overload 

The normal load of a student in any semester is sixteen semester hours. A 
student in Good Standing may register for a maximum of eighteen semester 
hours in a semester. An overload to a maximum of nineteen semester hours re- 
quires a Cumulative Quality Point Average of 3.0 and permission of the Dean of 
the School. (See Section 2.2 for overload fee.) 

Repeating Courses 

A student may repeat a maximum of four courses in which grades of E or 
WF have been recorded. Multiple repeats of the same course are considered as 
one repeat. A course repeat at another institution of higher education is included 
in the permitted maximum number of repeats. A course previously passed may 
not be repeated. 

Credit by Examination 

A student may petition for the privilege of establishing credit in a course or 
courses listed in the catalogue through a comprehensive examination instead of 
through registration and class attendance. The following regulations govern this 
provision: 

The student must present evidence of adequate experience with the course 
content either through experience other than college attendance or through inde- 
pendent study of the course content. 

The student may not petition for an examination in a course audited, nor 
in a course from which a failing grade has been recorded. 

The student must present evidence of equivalent experience if the course in- 
volves laboratory or studio work. 



mi ( i \ss Standing 

I he student's petition must be approved in sequence bv the department 
chairman and the dean ot the school. 

An examination committee must be appointed bv the department chairman 
and approved by the dean ot the school. I'nless the course is an advanced course 
which is taught by only one member ot the facility, the examination committee 
must include at least two faculty members. 

Ihe examination must cover the course syllabus in a comprehensive man- 
ner. Suitable standardized examinations may be used. The examination must be 
written or, it oral, subject to transcription. Where skill, as in typewriting or 
shorthand, is a course requirement, the written and oral aspects must be supple- 
mented by demonstration of skill. All papers must be filed in the department 
fice for three years following graduation. 

It the student passes the examination, the grade of "P" is assigned for the 
course It he she tails, no record is made. This course does not count in the 
student's normal quota of pass-fail courses. 

A flat fee of $25 is charged for each course challenged by institutional 
examination taken for credit, regardless of the number of credits awarded for that 
course. Upon receipt of approval, this fee is payable at the College Business Of- 
fice. Evidence of payment must be presented to the department before the exami- 
nation can be administered. 

Suitable adaptations of the above procedures may be used to validate 
transfer courses taken in non-accredited colleges. No fee is charged for examina- 
tion to validate such credit. Examinations may be based upon the syllabi o\ the 
courses taken in the previous institution or, in case the student wishes to establish 
equivalency with courses in this college, upon the syllabi of courses offered in this 
institution. 



Auditing of Courses 

A full-time student who is enrolled for less than seventeen semester hours 
of course work may, with consent of the Vice-President for Academic Affairs and 
subject to overload fees as stated in Section 2.2, register for one course as an au- 
ditor. If the registrant attends at least three-fourths of the regular class meetings 
the grade of V will be reported by the instructor and the course will be entered 
on the academic record without credit. No assignments are made to an auditor 
and no papers or examinations are accepted by the instructor for grading or 
record either during the period of enrollment or subsequent thereto \n auditor 
may not participate in laboratory or studio work if such work is part of the 
course audited. 

A part-time student mav register as an auditor, subject to the provision that 
when computing the tee paid bv the student the course audited will be counted 
the same as if it were taken tor credit. Individuals who are not enrolled as 
students mav apply tor audit privileges through the Dean of Extended Programs; 
acceptance depends upon such (actors as space in class and educational back- 
ground. 

(lass Standing 

\ Student has academic standing as a freshman until he she ha- 
semester hours ot credit; as a sophomore trom 32 to 63 semester hours, a junior 
from M to 95 semester hours, and a senior after 96 Of more semester hours ot 
credit. Iraristci credit, it anv. is included in these figures. 

r purposes of social anil housing privileges and regulations, the defini- 
tions ot class Standing arc as follows: freshman, f<> <;/;</ including ~^ 
hows; sophomore, 30 io 59 scnu'Mt'r hours; junior, 60 Ttester hours; 

senior, vo or more semester hours or a semesters </^ <; full-time student. 



Cl *SS All! NDANC 1 M 

Definition of FuII-Time Student 

An individual who has registered for twelve OF more semester hour- 
classified as a full-time student throughout the semester. One who registers for 
less than twelve semester hours is a part-time student. Where the word "student" 
appears in this catalogue without clarification either by word or context, "full- 
time student" is implied. 

Progress Reports 

At the mid-point of each semester a student may request from his her 
instructor an estimate of the grade in the first half of the semester. This estimate 
is not made a part of the permanent record. 

At the end of a semester or summer term, the final grade for each course is 
recorded on the student's permanent record; a copy of the semester grades is sent 
to the student at his her home address or another address designated by the 
student. 

5.02 CLASS ATTENDANCE 

A student who is absent from a class for reason which can be verified as 
urgent is entitled to a reasonable amount of assistance from the instructor in 
making up the work which was missed. This includes permission to make up an 
examination given the class during the absence and the late submitting of assign- 
ments that were due during the period of absence. Urgent reasons are defined as 
illness of the student, serious illness or death of a member of the student's family, 
and other events beyond the control of the student and of such nature as to 
prevent attendance. Students whose absences do not fall within this category may 
not claim the privilege of making up work. It is the responsibility of the student 
to provide verification of the reason for absence if requested by the instructor 
when applying for the privilege of making up work missed. 

5.03 GRADES, QUALITY POINTS AND 
QUALITY POINT AVERAGES 

Definition of Grades 

The grades given at Bloomsburg State College are defined as follows: 

A— Excellent. This means both excellent when judged by the instructor's 
standards and of higher quality than the performance of students earning a B. 

B— Superior. This means the work is of a quality sufficient to be 
recognized as better than average, though below excellence. 

C— Satisfactory. The instructor considers the student's performance satis- 
factory and about average for the typical student. 

D— Minimum Passing Grade. While the student has met the instructor's 
minimum standards and passes the course, his work was definitely below average. 

E— Failure. The student has not met minimum standards for passing the 
course and receives no credit. 

W— Withdrawn prior to the end of the week following the announced 
midpoint of the semester. 

WP— Withdrawn, passing. Withdrawal occurred during the second half of 
the course, though the student had earned passing grades so far. 

\VF— Withdrawn, failing. Withdrawal occurred while student's standing 
was below the D-mark and after the date set for withdrawing with a simple W. 

I— Incomplete. This grade is given only when because of circumstances be- 
yond his/her control the student has been unable to complete certain of the obli- 
gations of the course and when a plan exists and is understood by both instructor 
and student whereby the work which remained to be done may be completed and 






graded When the work has been completed, a permanent grade is submitted by 
the instructor to replace the grade oi "\" 

I nless specif icalh stated in a written plan filed in the Registrar's Office it is 
.mcd that the work will be completed prior to the end of the next semester. If 
the plan is not fulfilled, the grade of "I" remains a pan of the student's record (it 
is not subject to change at a later time). In the case of graduate students the 
tirade o\ I is replaced b> symbol N; this symbol remains permanently on the 
student's record. 

A request for extension of time for the removal of a grade of T" may be 
granted upon approval of the instructor and the dean of the school after suitable 
documentation has been presented indicating that circumstances above and be- 
yond the control of the student persist or new circumstances of that nature have 
developed. 

P— Passed. This grade is recorded when a student takes a course on a P 
Fail basis and does work which would lead to a grade of "D" or higher. The 
grade of P is also recorded when a course is passed by proficiency examination. 

F— This grade is recorded when a student takes a course on a Pass-Fail 
basis and does work which would lead to a grade of "E". 

V — Audit. This grade is recorded when a student has registered as an audi- 
tor and attends the class for three-fourths or more of its regular meetings. The 
entire set of rules governing auditing of courses appears in Section 5.01. 

R— Research in Progress. This grade is recorded when a research proje. 
in progress but not yet completed and there is a definite plan for completion of 
the course work. 

Quality Points 

Grades of A, B, C, D, E and WF have quality point values as follov 

Grade Qualitv Points 

A 4 

B 3 

C 2 

D 1 

E 

WF 

Quality Point Average 

A number called the Quality Point Average (abbreviated QPA) is computed 
from the record of courses taken at Bloomsburg State College with grades of -V 
B, C, D, WF and E. The computation process is as follows 

(I) Multiply the number of semester hours for each course by the number 
of quality points for the grade in the course, and add the prod,.. 
Divide the sum obtained in the first step b> the total number o! 
semester hours represented by the OOUTM 
A "Semester QPA" is computed by including only the OOUTM ngle 

semester. The "Cumulative QPA" is that computed by including all courses taken 
to date at Bloomsburg State College; if a course has been successfully repeated, 
the credits are counted only once in the computation. If a course :ully 

repeated at another accredited institution oi higher education, the credits for the 
failure at Bloomsburg State College are deleted from the computation. 

Change of Grade 

Her a grade ha\ been reported to the Registrm U may be changed 

only to COnect a computational or clerical error. A recommendation for change 
ot grade must be made in writing by the instructor and approved by the depart- 
ment chairperson and the dean oi the appropriate school. 



Ri ii n iios Poi l< IIS 63 

5.04 HONORS 

The name of a student whose Semester QPA is 3.5 or higher is included in 
the Dean's List for that semester. 

Graduation honors are recognized as follows: A student whose Cumulative 
Quality Point Average is 3.50 to 3.59 is graduated with Honors; 3.60 to 3.74, with 
High Honors; 3.75 to 4.00 with Highest Honors. 

5.05 ACADEMIC GOOD STANDING 

A student whose record at any final grading period shows a cumulative 
quality point average of 2.00 or better is considered in Academic Good Standing. 
(There are three final grading periods, the Fall Semester, the Spring Semester, 
and the total Summer Terms. 



5.06 MINIMAL PROGRESS 

A student not attaining a 2.00 cumulative quality point average shall be 
considered as making minimal progress toward academic good standing according 
to the following: 

TOTAL NUMBER OF SEMESTER 

HOURS IN COURSES PASSED CUMULATIVE QUALITY POINT 

INCLUDING GRADES OF "P" AVERAGE REQUIRED FOR 

AND TRANSFER CREDIT MINIMAL PROGRESS 



1.25-1.99 Minimal progress toward 
academic good standing 

1.50-1.99 Minimal progress toward 
academic good standing 

1.75-1.99 Minimal progress toward 
academic good standing 



To and including 18 sem. hrs. 
19-30 sem. hrs. 
31-54 sem. hrs. 

5.07 RETENTION POLICIES 

Academic Probation 

A student in one of the following categories is permitted to attend on 
Academic Probation for one additional final grading period (semester or sum- 
mer): 

(a) an entering freshman whose Quality Point Average at the end of his/her 
first final grading period is at least 1.00 but less than 1.25; 

(b) a transfer student whose Quality Point Average at his/her first final 
grading period is less than, but within 0.25 of, that required for Good 
Standing; 

(c) a full-time student who has been in Good Standing continuously for at 
least two consecutive final grading periods immediately prior to a grad- 
ing period in which his/her Cumulative Quality Point Average drops 
below, but within 0.1 of, that required for Good Standing; 

(d) a full-time freshman or transfer student who was in good standing at 
the end of the first grading period following entrance but whose Quality 
Point Average at the end of the second grading period is below but 
within 0. 1 of that required for good standing. 

The record of a student in any of these categories is marked "Academic 
Probation." 

Final Grading Period is defined in Section 5.05. 



Academic Dismissal 

A student who at any final grading period is neither in Good Standing nor 
qualified to attend for a semester on academic probation is excluded from regis- 
tration and his her record is marked "Academic Dismissal." 



64 \i'i'l \l I 

\ student under academic dismissal is ineligible to attend an I of- 

fered bv the College lor a period ot at least one calendar vear Readmission regu- 
lations are stated in Section 4.11. 

Appeals 

\ student under academic dismissal may petition the Academic Review 
Board tor reinstatement. If reinstatement is granted, the conditions pertaining 
thereto are stated, and the student's record is marked " Reinstated." If the student 
does not attain Good Standing by the end of the period granted by the conditions 
of reinstatement he she is excluded from further registration and his her record is 
again marked "Academic Dismissal." 

Petitions to the Academic Review Board must he in writing and must be 
filed with the Vice-President for Academic Affairs within 48 hours of receipt of 
notification. 

The Academic Review Board comprises the Deans of the Schools of Arts 
and Sciences, Professional Studies, and Business; a representative of the Vice- 
President for Student Life; the Director of the Counseling Center; the Dean of 
Admissions and Records; the Dean of Extended Programs; and the Registrar of 
the College. At the initiative of either the applicant or the Academic Review 
Board, the student's adviser will be invited to participate as a voting member in 
the consideration of the case. 

In its evaluation of a petition for reinstatement, the Academic Review 
Board is charged to consider: the degree to which external factors beyond the 
student's control temporarily prevented optimum academic achievement; the 
likelihood that these or similar factors would not recur if reinstatement were 
granted; the likelihood that the student, if reinstated, can complete his her cur- 
riculum successfully within a reasonable extension of the normal four-year period; 
an evaluation of the plan for attaining Good Standing proposed by the student as 
a part of his her petition; and such other factors as may seem pertinent. 
Reinstatement is an expression of confidence on the part of the Board in the 
student's potential for successful completion of his her curriculum and his her 
fulfillment of its purposes. 

A student whose petition for reinstatement has been denied by the 
Academic Review Board may appeal the decision within 48 hours to a special 
panel consisting of the vice-presidents of the College, provided the dean of the 
school in which the student has been enrolled supports the appeal by certifying a 
judgment that it presents evidence concerning pertinent factors that either were 
not placed before the Board or were given insufficient attention. The appellant 
must petition in writing through the Vice-President for Academic Affairs; he she 
may also be required to appear before the panel in person. All members o\ the 
panel must concur in any decision to reverse the Academic Review Board. The 
decision of the panel is final. 

5.08 KVALUATION OF TRANSFER CREDITS 

Evaluation o\ credit earned at other institutions is made by the Admissions 
Office with guidelines supplied by the department chairperson, cooperative!) es- 
tablished by the appropriate school dean. Credits for acceptable courses transter; 
grades, quality points, and grade point average do not transfer. 

Acceptable courses must have been completed in an accredited college or 
University or in a recognized Or accredited junior college or communitv college. 
Courses must be applicable to the student's curriculum either as substitutes for re- 
quired courses oi as electives, credit will be deleted it the student subsequently 
registers tor courses which substantially duplicate the content ot courses accepted 
for transk-r 

A student is entitled to an opportunity to validate bv examination ■ course 
presented tor transter when the substitution of transfer credit for a required 



(Ill M IMr. I I SI l\(, 65 

course is in question because the course was taken in an unaccredited institution 
or because of uncertainty concerning the syllabus or standards of the course. 
When they are available, standardized examinations are used. 

Correspondence courses are subject to acceptance to a total that does not 
exceed fifteen semester hours if taken from an accredited college or university and 
acceptable by that institution toward graduation in a baccalaureate degree cur- 
riculum. 

Courses taken in another institution on a Pass-Fail basis are acceptable if 
they conform to the conditions for such grades at Bloomsburg State College. 

A transfer student is issued an evaluation sheet which stipulates the require- 
ments for graduation which remain to be met; this is subject to revision in the 
light of subsequent changes in the evaluation of the transcript. 

Students of Bloomsburg State College may take courses in other accredited 
institutions and submit the credit for transfer, provided the courses have been ap- 
proved in advance by the dean of the appropriate school. 

(See Section 5. 13 for limitations on credit transferred from other institu- 
tions.) 

5.09 CHEATING AND PLAGIARISM 

Attempts by students to improve grades by cheating in tests and examina- 
tions or by plagiarism in papers submitted to the instructor are offenses subject to 
penalties which may be as severe as suspension or expulsion. 

The instructor may assess penalties ranging from a privately administered 
reprimand to a grade of E in the course. If the offense appears to merit a more 
severe penalty, the instructor is responsible for initiating a request for formal 
consideration by the Student-Faculty Judiciary. 

In order to avoid the appearance of plagiarism resulting from ignorance of 
the proper use of source materials, the student should study the conventions 
governing use of sources. Such information can be obtained from instructors or 
from handbooks found in the Library. 

5.10 TESTING PROGRAMS 

Each new student is required to take entrance classification tests during the 
orientation period. The results of the tests are used for advisement, counseling, 
research, and reports. No fee is charged for these tests. 

A number of other tests are administered by the College; these are offered 
as a service to students who may need them for special purposes. Among the tests 
currently available are the National Teacher Examination, Graduate Management 
Admissions Test, Graduate School Foreign Language Tests, Law School Ad- 
mission Test, Test of English as a Foreign Language, Graduate Record Examina- 
tion. Information concerning these and other tests may be obtained from the 
Center for Counseling and Human Development. 

5.11 RESIDENCE REQUIREMENT 

At least 32 of the last 64 semester hours credited toward a baccalaureate 
degree must be taken in residence at Bloomsburg State College. Former students 
of the College who are certificated for teaching by completing two or three years 
of college work and who are candidates for the Bachelor of Science in Education 
degree, must complete at least one half of the remaining work for the degree in 
residence. Residence credit is given for courses taught on the Bloomsburg State 
College campus in a semester, a summer term, in evening or Saturday classes for 
teachers, and for off-campus student teaching. 

5.12 GRADUATE COURSES IN SENIOR YEAR 

Seniors who in their last semester of residence need fewer than fifteen 
semester hours of course work to satisfy their requirements for the baccalaureate 



f* ( iK \D! \ I IDS 




degree may apply to the Dean of Graduate Studies for permission to supplement 
their undergraduate courses with graduate courses, providing the total of under- 
graduate and graduate courses will not exceed 16 semester hours. If permission is 
granted, credit in the graduate courses is held in reserve. 

5.13 GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 

A candidate for graduation with a baccalaureate degree must have a 2.00 or 
higher cumulative quality point average, have satisfied the residence requirements 
and completed all course requirements of one of the curricula. 

The minimum credit requirement for a baccalaureate degree is 12S semester 
hours. 

The last 64 semester hours of the credit counted toward graduation must be 
in courses taken in four-year baccalaureate degree-granting college. (For the 
minimum residence requirements in this College, see Section 5.10.) 

Secondary majors in foreign languages must have satisfied the departmental 
examination requirement. 

The Diploma Fee ($5.00) must have been paid. 

All financial obligations to the College (library fines, parking fines, any un- 
paid tuition or bousing tees, loans, etc.) must have been cleared. 

The candidate must have arranged an exit intemew with the Director o\~ 
Financial Aid. 



5.14 SECOND BACCALAUREATE DEGREE 

\n individual Who applies for I second baccalaureate degree must have 
completed the first degree at Hloomsburg State College or another college or 
University and must have added thereto at least 30 semester hours in under- 
graduate courses taken in residence during regular academic \ears and or sum- 
mer terms at Hloomsburg State College All requirements for the curriculum in 
which the second degree is earned must ha\e been satisfied and free elective credit 
must have been taken it necessar\ to complete the additional thirty semester 
hours It a given course is required in both degree programs, it must not be 
repeated tor the second degree. 



Choice <>i o krk ulum f> 7 



6. Undergraduate Curricula: 
Introduction 



6.1 CHOICE OF CURRICULUM 

The undergraduate curricula are administered by three schools, the School 
of Arts and Sciences, the School of Professional Studies and the School of Busi- 
ness. The requirements of the curricula are stated in the chapters which deal with 
these schools. 

With the exception of students interested in studying in the programs in the 
School of Business or in the Nursing program in the School of Professional 
Studies, all students are assigned to the School of Arts and Sciences upon ad- 
mission to the college. Students may declare themselves "undecided", or may 
express an interest in studying in any of the arts and sciences, pre-professional, 
teacher education or professional studies majors. In the latter case, they are tenta- 
tively assigned to advisors in those areas. In either case, a student must have 
committed himself herself and received admission to a curriculum by the end of 
the sophomore year. (Students who transfer to Bloomsburg State College with 
junior standing have a one semester grace period on this requirement.) 

When a student makes a tentative choice of a major he/she is assigned 
preliminary or prerequisite courses required in that major. In curricula where ad- 
mission is selective or restrictive at the junior year entry-level, as in the case in 
several programs in the School of Professional Studies, the college is not bound 
to admit the student if he/she is not admissable according to the competion for 
available spaces or other selective criteria. 

6.2 CREDIT 

Each curriculum which leads to a baccalaureate degree requires the success- 
ful completion of 128 semester hours of credit. A semester hour is defined as the 
credit for one weekly period of fifty minutes in lecture, discussion or recitation 
for one semester; in case a course requires laboratory, shop or stuio experience, 
two or in some cases three periods are considered as equivalent to one period of 
lecture, discussion or recitation. 



6.3 non-credit/developmental courses 

Through services provided by the Center for Academic Development, a 
student, regardless of his/her current academic program or prior academic perfor- 
mance may enroll in developmental courses. These courses serve to supplement 
the student's academic experience and are not counted towards his/her credit re- 
quirement for graduation. Developmental courses provided include: 

01.100 Developmental Communications Skills I (Writing) no credit 

•Course covers four types of basic prose writing: exposition, narration, description, 
and narration. Emphasis will be placed upon exposition, clarification, and explanation of 
facts and ideas. 

01.101 Developmental Communication Skills II (Writing) no credit 

A continuation and refining of the skills developed in the previous session. 

01.102 Study Skills no credit 

To teach proven methods and reinforce the use of those methods of study which can 
provide for mastery of subject matter. The program includes suggestions for the using study 
time wisely, taking, summarizing and organizing notes, writing term papers, and taking 
tests. 



K M [ 



6.4 GENERAL EDI CATION REQUIREMENTS 

I he primary, objective ol General Education is to encourage in students, ir- 
respective Ol their vocational pursuits, the development of those understandings. 
attitudes, values, and lOCial skills that uill enable them to enjo\ a fuller life and 
to pla> a more constructive role in society. 

Ihe pattern of general education outlined above reflects a belief that a 
college must attempt to insure that the standards of an educated person in read- 
ing and Writing have been attained, and should require the student to r 
experiences in the three reeoimi/ed broad areas of knowledge: the humanities for 
their insights concerninu intellectual and ethieal values, the social sciences for 
enlightenment basic to understanding problems of societv, and the sciences and 
mathematics tor mature appreciation of the contribution of these branchc- 
knouledge in determining the nature of an industrial-technical society. 

Prescription of general education courses has been set at a minimum in 
order to give each student, with the help of an advisor, the opportunity to survey 
his her previous background and choose new intellectual experiences that provide 
opportunity lor optimum growth. This policy places important responsibility 
upon the student lor discrimination in making decisions. 

General Education courses should be those which contribute to the 
broadening and rounding of our students' education in line with the stated 
philosophy of General Education. 

Each college department will re-list General Education courses subject to 
appropriate review. 

(General Education courses should not be those which were designed pri- 
marily for majors in a discipline and should not be courses in methods and ma- 
terials.) 
I. REQl IRED COURSES: 

English Composition 101 and 200 or 201 3-6 S.H 

Honors Composition 104 

( I pon admission to the college, qualified students, by virtue of their class 

rank and SAT verbal score are placed into this class) 
Physical Education (Activity courses only with 4 S.H. 

a minimal competency in swimming.) 
II. SPECIAL ELECTIVES 

This requirement is fulfilled by taking an indicated number of semester 

hours from each of the three groups, with at least two o\ the disciplines o\ 

each group represented. I he student's major discipline may not be included 

in the general education requirement. Students with double majors must 

adhere to this policy tor only one o\ the disciplines. 

Group A Group B Group (' 

Humanities and Social/ Behavioral Natural Sciences 

the Arts Sciences and Mathematics 

\n I conomics Biologj 

English Geography Chemistr) 

I oreign I snguages Political Science Mathematics 

History Psychology Physio 

Music Sociolog) I .nth Sciences 

Philosophy \nthropolog) 

Speech Communication 

and ihc.it i c \ns 

15 s.H. 12 s.ii. 12 s.H. 

III. ADDITION \l El E< MM s 

Nine-twelve ( s> to 12) semestei hours of general education electives ma\ be 
selected from anv ol the disciplines listed under Special Electives and or 
from business, education, and health and physical education (excluding 
aetiv ities courses). 

fatal Hours 58 
Note Ml general education courses must he chosen from the general education 

courses list provided h\ the Office of the Vice President tor Academic Affairs <>nh 
those courses listed can be used to complete the General Education Requirement. 



Ba< < \i m ri \n Programs w 

7. School Of Arts And Sciences 

7.1 GENERAL INFORMATION 

The School of Arts and Sciences is composed of seventeen academic de- 
partments all of which, except Health and Physical Education, offer programs 
leading to either the Bachelor of Science or the Bachelor of Arts degree or both. 

The college was first authorized to offer the Bachelor of Arts degree in 
1960 and the Bachelor of Science in 1963. After a period of slow growth in the 
early 1960's, programs, departments, and enrollments in Arts and Sciences have 
increased steadily. 

Growth of the School of Arts and Sciences has also made the college more 
attractive to highly qualified, promising faculty, many of whom have been ap- 
pointed in the last decade. 

Degrees 

The degrees. Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) and Bachelor of Science (B.S.) are 
conferred for programs offered in the School of Arts and Sciences. 

The aim of a program which leads to the degree, Bachelor of Arts, is to of- 
fer the student opportunity for a liberal education through study in both breadth 
and depth of disciplines in the humanities, the social sciences and the natural 
sciences and mathematics. 

The aim of a program which leads to the Bachelor of Science degree is to 
offer opportunity for liberal education together with a specialization that may 
have the potential of application. 

There are two patterns for the Bachelor of Arts degree, a pattern of em- 
phasis upon a broad field and a pattern with a major in one of the academic dis- 
ciplines. 

7.2 BROAD AREA PROGRAMS FOR THE BACHELOR OF 
ARTS AND BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREES 

These programs offer opportunities for the student to follow a less conven- 
tional curriculum according to his/her preference or the anticipated requirements 
of a professional or graduate school or a profession at which he/she is aiming. 
The student fulfills the 58 semester hours of General Education requirements and 
then chooses to complete the prescribed Core Courses in the Humanities, the 
Social Sciences, or the Natural Sciences and Mathematics. He/she completes a 
total of 48 semester hours in the area of his/her core curriculum, with free elec- 
tives sufficient to bring him/her up to the 128 semester hour requirement for 
graduation. 

For the Broad Area Program in Humanities, the requirements are: 

English 363 Shakespeare 3 sem. hrs. 

English 302 Advanced Composition 3 sem. hrs. 

Speech 208 Intro, to Theater Arts 3 sem. hrs. 

Speech 321 Argumentation 3 sem. hrs. 

Philosophy 211 Intro, to Philosophy 3 sem. hrs. 

Philosophy 302 Logic 3 sem. hrs. 

Art History elective 3 sem. hrs. 

Music History elective 3 sem. hrs. 

History: any two 3-hour courses 6 sem. hrs. 

Foreign Language Option: 3 sem. hrs. 

Choose between 

1 semester of Intermediate Foreign Language 

1 semester of foreign literature course 
(in original or translation) 

1 semester of foreign culture & civilization 

Total Core 33 sem. hrs. 

Humanities electives 15 sem. hrs. 

Total Broad Area Humanities requirements 48 sem. hrs. 



70 \1 \l"K Sl'M I VI 1/ VIIOS 



Foi the Broad Area Program in the Social Sneme\. the requirements | 
omics 21 1-212 Principles o( Economics I-Il ^ sem hrs 

r.tphv anv two 3-hour courses fi sem. hrs. 

Political Science ioi Elements oi Political Science 

and one Political Science elective 6 sem. hrs. 

Sociology 211 Principle! ol Sociology and one 

Sociology elective 6 sem. hrs 

Anihropologv KM) General Anthropology, or Anthropol. . 

200. Principles ot Cultural Anthropology 3 sem. hrs. 

PSycholog) 101 General Psychology and one 

Psychology elective 6 sem. hrs. 

Total Core 33 sem. hrs 

Social Science elect ives 15 sem. hrs. 

Total Broad Area Social Science requirements 48 sem. hrs 

For the Broad Area Program in Satural Sciences Mathematics, the 
requirements are: 

•Mathematics 125-126 (Analysis I — 1 1 ) 6 sem. hrs. 

Mathematics 171 Intro, to Computer Programming, or 

172 Intro, to Basic Computer Programming 1 sem. hr. 

**Physics I 1 1-1 12 Introduction to Physics HI, 

or 21 1-212 General Physics 1—1 1 8 sem. hrs. 

Biology 210 General Zoology 4 sem. hrs. 

Biology 220 General Botany 4 sem. hrs. 

•••Chemistry 102 College Chemistry 4 sem. hrs. 

Chemistry 1 13 Chemistry Laboratory 2 sem. hrs 

Earth Science 101 Physical Geology 4 sem. hrs. 

Earth Science 102 Historical Geology 4 sem. hrs. 

Total Core 37 sem. hrs. 

Approved electives to complete Broad Area 

requirements:**** II sem. hrs. 

Total Broad Area Natural Science Mathematics 
requirements: 4S sem hrs. 

Subject to the discretion ol the Mathematics Department and the Advisor, the student 

will take Math. 113 Pre-Calculus betor Math. 125. 

••Subject to the discretion ol the student and the Advisor, considering that Physid 211 

requires a knowledge ol Calculus hut is a requirement for certain advanced courses in 

Physid and Chemistry 

•••The Chemistry Department and the Advisor will decide whether the student shall begin 

his Chemistry studies with Chem, ioi or 102, 

••••Elective! within the Broad fata requirements are to be chosen from a list compiled bv 
the Mathematics and Natural Science Departments and in possession ot the Advisor 
tor the students in this program 

7.3 PROGRAMS WITH MAJOR SPECIALIZATION IN 
THK SCHOOL OF ARTS & SCIENCES 
(DEGREES B.A. and B.S.) 

Requirements lor the arts and sciences degrees are as folloWl 

I he General Education requirements as given in Section 6.4 must be satis- 
tied; the major requirements as stated at the beginning o\ the course descriptions 



Pre-Professionai Sii DIES 71 



for the discipline must be fulfilled; elective credit in disciplines of the humanities, 
social sciences and natural sciences and mathematics must be added to give 
minimum total credit of 128 semester hours. 

Program 

♦American Studies 
Art Studio 
Art History 
Biology 

Chemistry 

♦Computer and Information Science 
Earth Sciences 



Economics 
Economics, Political 
English 
French 

Geography 

Geology 

German 

History 

Mass Communications 

Mathematics 

Music 

Philosophy 

Physics 

Political Science 

Psychology 

Sociology 

Sociology/ Anthropology 

Spanish 

Speech Communications 
(Debate and Forensic Science) 

Theatre Arts 

♦Interdisciplinary Program 



Degree 


Department 


B.A. 


Interdisciplinary Studies 


B.A. 


Department of Art 


B.A. 


Department of Art 


B.A., B.S. 


Department of Biological 




and Allied Health Sciences 


B.A., B.S. 


Department of Chemistry 


B.S. 


Interdisciplinary Studies 


B.S. 


Department of Geography 




and Earth Sciences 


B.A. 


Department of Economics 


B.A. 


Department of Economics 


B.A. 


Department of English 


B.A. 


Department of 




Foreign Languages 


B.A. 


Department of Geography 




and Earth Sciences 


B.S. 


Department of Geography 




and Earth Sciences 


B.A. 


Department of 




Foreign Languages 


B.A. 


Department of History 


B.A. 


Department of Speech, Mass 




Communications & Theater 


B.A., B.S. 


Department of Mathematics 


B.A. 


Department of Music 


B.A. 


Department of Philosophy 


B.A., B.S. 


Department of Physics 


B.A. 


Department of Political Science 


B.A. 


Department of Psychology 


B.A. 


Department of Sociology 


B.A. 


Department of Anthropology 


B.A. 


Department of 




Foreign Languages 



B.A. Department of Speech, Mass 

Communications and Theater 

B.A. Department of Speech, Mass 

Communications and Theater 



7.4 PRE-PROFESSIONAL STUDY AND ADVISEMENT 

•A Committee on Pre-Professional Health Science offers special, supple- 
mentary advisement to students who hope to seek admission to professional 
schools of medicine, dentistry, veterinary medicine, optometry, pharmacy. 

Members of this committee are assigned to help pre-professional students 
to familiarize themselves with admission requirements of the professional schools, 
and to select college courses in harmony with these requirements. They also assist 
students in preparing applications for admission to professional schools. 

Students who wish to undertake pre-professional study should indicate this 
interest on their application for admission to the College in order that an appro- 
priate adviser may be assigned at the outset of their studies. 



2 IM»I I'lMMM Si I I><| 

Pre-medicine, Pre-dentistry, Pre-veterinary Medicine, 

Pre-optometry, Pre-pharmac\ 

\i a rule, professional schools in these areas do not specify an under- 
graduate major, but they do specify minimum essential courses, especially in the 

sciences and mathematics. These minimum requirements usually include COW 
in general chemistry, organic chemistry, mathematics, biology and physics. High 
standards of undergraduate scholarship are demanded for consideration 

Pre- Law 

Students who wish to prepare to study law should familiarize themsehes 
with the entrance requirements of law schools they are considering. A Pre- 1 
Advisory Committee drawn from several Departments makes a continuing stud> 
of such schools; its members will advise students in the choice of courses. Most 
law schools will consider applications from students with widely varying ma; 
placing emphasis on a thoroughly cultivated mind rather than any specific body 
of knowledge. 

7.5 INDEPENDENT STUDY 

The independent study opportunity within each department provides an op- 
portunity for the student to pursue in-depth individualized instruction in a topic 
of special value of interest to the student. A limited number of independent study 
offerings are available each semester. Students interested in applying for inde- 
pendent study should develop a written proposal with his her faculty sponsor. 
The number of semester hours credit should be specified in the proposal. Inde- 
pendent study proposals along with the name of the faculty sponsor should be 
submitted to departments for recommendation, then to the Dean of Arts and 
Sciences for final approval. 




Ami RICAN Si i DIES \M> Ai< I 73 

AMERICAN STUDIES 

FACULTY: (See Interdisciplinary Studies) 

PROGRAM: 

The American Studies baccalaureate program provides the student with a variety of 
choices replacing the single-discipline major. There are two categories, the institutional and 
the cultural, either of which may lead to the B.A. degree or may be used as an area of spe- 
cialization in Secondary Education. 

The institutional option emphasizes the Social Sciences, English and Mass Com- 
munications, and History, as well as some Business and Educational Philosophy courses; 
the cultural option, besides literature and the fine arts, also features the Social Sciences, 
History, and some Education courses. In either option, including the use of American 
Studies as an area of specialization in Education, the student is required to take three 
seminars in American Studies. 

The Seminars 09.311 and 09.312 are open as electives to students from any other 
fields. Sophomore standing is the only prerequisite. The follow-up, numbered 421, requires 
completion of 09.312. Seminars in this field will vary widely in subject matter, which will 
depend on agreement of professor and student in each case. 

AMERICAN STUDIES: 

Arts and Sciences major for the B.A. degree 

1. Fifteen semester hours in area of emphasis (electives within cultural 

or institutional area); 15 hrs. 

2. One seminar or course on research methods in English, Art, History, 
Sociology, or Political Science 3 hrs. 

3. American Studies Seminar 09.31 1, 09.312, and 09.421 9-12 hrs. 

Total 27-30 hrs. 

ART 

FACULTY: 

Professor Percival R. Roberts, III (Chairperson); Associate Professors Robert B. Koslosky, 
Kenneth T. Wilson, Stewart L. Nagel, Barbara J. Strohman; Assistant Professors Karl A. 
Beamer, John F. Cook, Jr., Gary F. Clark, Charles T. Walters. 

Arts and Sciences Major for B.A. degree: 

Art History: 31.315, 325, 335, 336, 345, 346, 375, 415, 495. 

Art Studio: 32.250 and 310; 30.101 or any art history; 32.330 or 340; 12 semester 
hours in one of the following: Ceramics, Drawing, Fabric Design, Graphics, Paint- 
ing, Sculpture, Weaving. 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

GENERAL-ART EDUCATION 

(Code 30) 
30.101 INTRODUCTION TO ART t 3 sem. hrs. 

Great works of art, past and present, with an analysis of the structure of art as de- 
termined by civilization, communication, and expression. 

30.303 CRAFTS IN SPECIAL EDUCATION 

A workshop course designed to involve students in a variety of crafts experiences for 
many different types of special learners. 

30.305 CHILDREN'S ART t 3 sem. hrs. 

Encounters with the art of children and ways to promote attitudes of discovery and 
invention, with emphasis on growth of expression. 



Huron 

30.306 MM \i \kis FOR THE EXCEPTIONAL (Hill) 3 vem. hrv 

I he importance ol art activity, theory and practice, as a n riching and 

stimulating the special child's awareness ol himself and his work J Emphasis 

placed on those posimc aspects tor creati\e actiut> which the handicapped child possesses. 

and Ptychoiog) ma/ors *uh Junior class standing 

MJSS PHILOSOPHY \NI) PSYCHOLOGY Of \RI 3 sem. hrs. 

A stud> ol major philosophical points of uew governing an understanding and 
criticism o\ the arts, past and present, together with 20th century readings in the psychology 
ol art and the content and biology ot artistic form. 

30.450 ARI EDUCATION IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOl 3 sem. hrs. 

Ihconcs and techniques hasic to the use of art in the elementary school. 



ART HISTORY 
(Code 31) 

31.315 AMERICAN ART HISTORY 3 st-m. hrs. 

A studs of the history of the visual arts in America. 

31.325 HISTORY OF ARCHITECTURE + 3 vem. hrs. 

•\ study-survey of great architectural works of the past and present, including exam- 
ples from both the East and West, with emphasis on sources for 19th and early 20th century 
architectural design. 

31.335 EUROPEAN ART HISTORY 1 + 3 sem. hrs. 
A study of the histors of the visual arts on the European continent from the prehis- 
toric up to and including the Late Gothic. 

31.336 LATE EUROPEAN ART HISTORY II + 3 sem. hrs. 

\ study ot the history o\ the visual arts beginning with the Renaissance up to and 
including French painting oi the 19th century. 

31345 ORIENTAL ART HISTORY I + 3 sem. hrs. 

A study ol the history o! the \isual arts oi the Islamic World. 

31.346 ORIENTAL ART HISTORY H 1 3 sem. hrs. 

\ studs oi the histor\ of the visual arts in South India. Indonesia. China and Japan 

31.355 HISTORY OF MODERN ART t 3 sem. hrs. 

Contemporary movements in art from the nineteenth century to the present. 

31.375 INDEPENDEN1 slim IN OKI HISTOR1 1-3 sem. hrs. 

Independent stud\ involving research and scholarship in art histor\ under the super- 
vision ol | faculty member and resulting in a scholarh contribution to the field and or a 
published paper on a selected topic related to the student's research 

[see 

31.415 PRIMlTIVI \R1s 3 sem. hrs. 

I his course is also listed as \nthropolog> 46410 Ottered in cooperation with the 
Department ol Anthropology A sur\e> o\ graphic arts, literature, music and the dance oi 
ancient and non-I liropean cultures, with slides, films, spcciments. and recordings. 

M.4^5 MM \| UMm IK s 3sem. hrs. 

unar stud> ol the "silent image" emphasizing artistic concern with environmental 
relationships, and theories ot aesthetics and art criticism. 



Am Studio 75 



STUDIO 

(Code 32) 

Note: Studio courses meet 6 periods per week for 3 semester hours credit. 



32.250 DESIGN I t 3 sem. hrs. 

An introduction to principles of design and organization of the visual elements, 
involving hoth two and three dimensional problems. 

32.275 CRAFTS I t 3 sem. hrs. 

Introduction to a varied array of crafts; methods, tools, materials, techniques and 
concepts. 

32.276 CRAFTS II 3 sem. hrs. 

Continued exploration of selected in-depth crafts' processes and concepts on a more 
individualized basis. 

32.300 CERAMICS I + 3 sem. hrs. 

An introduction to the processes of making and firing ceramic objects. 

32.301 CERAMICS II 3 sem. hrs. 

At this level the student is afforded the opportunity to become more involved by se- 
lecting his/her own methods of working. 
Prerequisite: Art 32.300. 

32.302 CERAMICS III 3 sem. hrs. 

The student seeks specialization through the pursuit of making an art object. 
Prerequisite: Art 32.301. 

32.303 CERAMICS IV 3 sem. hrs. 

The student will be responsible for making, firing, and showing his/her own wares. 
Prerequisite: Art 32.302 

32.310 DRAWING + 3 sem. hrs. 

An introduction and application of the basic attitudes with which a person draws. 
Emphasis on visual awareness. 

32.311 DRAWING II 3 sem. hrs. 

Composition and form in drawing. 
Prerequisite: Art 32.310. 

32.312 DRAWING III 3 sem. hrs. 

Stresses sending form into space. 
Prerequisite: Art 32.311. 

32.313 DRAWING IV 3 sem. hrs. 

Stresses individuality and deep involvement of personal expression. 
Prerequisite: Art 32.312. 

32.320 FABRIC DESIGN I t 3 sem. hrs. 

An introduction to a variety of methods, approaches, tools, materials and visual con- 
cepts in designing with fibers. Areas include fabric decoration, hand made loom and off-the- 
loom fiber constructions, sculptural forms in fibers or rope, fiber techniques with metals, 
fabric collage, drawing and painting with fibers, wall hangings, rugmaking, sewn stitched 
and stuffed forms, netting, applique, knotting, leno, stitchery and many other areas. Open 
to all students. No prerequisites. 



: Si i Dl<> 

I2J2I I \BRI( DESIGN II 3 s*m. hrs 

\ continuation ol fabric Design 1 with limited -ncentration selected by 

>tudenl. Professional methods, approaches and attitudes discussed 
Prerequisite. Fabric Design I or permission of the instructor. 

I2J22 I \BKI( DESIGN III 3 ism hrs. 

\ continuation ol fabric Design II with concentration in one area selected by the 

student FOCUS is on refining one's craft, visual perception and p .i attitude. 
\bric Design II or permission of the instructor. 

32J23 FABRH DESIGN H 3 sem. hrs. 

A continuation ol Fabric Design III with each student functioning in one area in a 

highly independent and professional manner. Self criticism, self identity in the fabric design 

field, career opportunities, graduate school opportunities and professional practice in fabric 

design discussed. 

Prerequisite: Fabric Design II or permission of the instructor. 

MJM PAINTING It 3 sem. hrs. 

f (ploration and sensitrvit) to environment through paint. 

32J31 PAINTING 3 sem. hrs. 

Attention to technical skill inherent in the image formation. Study o\ the landscape 

as a concept in painting. 
Prerequisite: 32.330. 

32.332 PAINTING III 3 sem. hrs. 
Development into maturity of style and statement. Study o\ the figure as a concept 

in painting. 
Prerequisite: 32.331. 

32.333 PAINTING IV 3 sem. hrs. 
Advanced work planned for individual needs. Paintings are structured from 

experiences based upon previous development. 

Prerequisite: 32332. 

32.340 S( I LPTURE I + 3 sem. hrs. 
A Studio course in three-dimensional expression, with its primary goal to expose the 

student to basic sculptural materials. 

32.341 SCI LPTURE II 3 sem. hrs. 
Continued development in the use o\ materials and processes directing itself towards 

unique individual expression. 
Prerequisite 323 fO. 

32.342 SCULPTI RE IN 3 sem. hrv 
Sculpture focuses on the expansion ot expression and its relationships to sculptural 

processes 

341. 

12.343 SCULPTURE I! 3 sem. hrs. 

Vdvanced Work planned foi individual! needs toward I maturing Style in sculpti. 
\42 

I2JM Wl VMM. I 3 sem. hn». 

V introduction to weaving. History o! weaving, tools, libers ind looms 

(parts and function). 
Prerequisite 32.250 OT permission of instructor. 



\i< i Si i DIO 77 

32J51 WEAVING 11 3 Mm. hrs. 

Weaving techniques experiencing the loom controlled weaves 

Prerequisite 32.350. 

12.352 WI WING Ill 3 si- m. hrs. 

ntinued experience in weaving techniques with emphasis on in-depth production. 
:n 01 3D. 

Prerequisite: 32.351. 

32J53 WEAVING IV 3 tern. hrs. 

Developing an individualistic approach to weaving by exploring and experimenting. 

Integrating and combing woven materials as well as non-woven materials in order to 
achieve a unified statement. 
Prerequisite: 32.352. 

32.3*1 GRAPHICS 1 + 3 sem. hrs. 

Exploration of the techniques of Relief; woodcut, linocut, and collagraph; intaglio: 
etching, aquatint and drypoint; Serigraphy: glue and film methods. 

32.361 GRAPHICS II 3 sem. hrs. 

Color and color registration methods. Concentration in seriography. 
Prerequisite: 32.360. 

32.362 GRAPHICS III 3 sem. hrs. 

Introduction to mixed media techniques. Introduction to lithographc and 
photographic printmaking. 
Prerequisite: 32.361. 

32.363 GRAPHICS IV 3 sem. hrs. 

Individual exploration of traditional and experimental printmaking methods. Em- 
phasis on personal expression. 
Prerequisite: 32.362. 

32.370 ENAMELLING* f 3 sem. hrs. 

Enamelling on metals, exploring multifaceted applications in jewelry and sculpture 
and wall plaques and investigating the basic processes such as cloisonne, plique-a-jour, 
inlay, basse-taille, etc. 

32.380 JEWELRY MAKING* + 3 sem. hrs. 

A study of jewelry forms past and present from the standpoint of both utility and 
design. Problems in wood and metals, ceramics, glass, and plastics, exploring contemporary 
jewelry forms and processes. 

32.395 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN ART MEDIA 1-6 sem. hrs. 

Individualized production in the plastic arts not covered by other studio course offer- 
ings, and in-depth explorations, innovative uses and applications of selected art media. 
Course may be repeated more than once with the instructor's consent. [see section 7.5] 

32.396 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN ART MEDIA II 1-6 sem. hrs. 

Individualized production in the plastic arts not covered by the other studio course 
offerings and in-depth explorations, innovative uses and applications of selected art media. 
Course may be repeated more than once with the instructor's consent. [see section 7.5] 

32.475 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN STUDIO ARTS I 1-3 sem. hrs. 

[see section 7.5] 

32.476 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN STUDIO ARTS II 1-3 sem. hrs. 

Individualized independent study in studio areas. Amount of course credit awarded 
determined by instructor and written proposal of student with the consent of the depart- 



LOG > KHD 

ment chairrr.an on the hasis ot substance and depth ot project to he undertaken. 

- us equivalent. 

[sec section 7.5] 

njm IMrKNsHII' IN AR1 %em. hrv 

P rovid es upper le\el art majors with an opportunity to acquire meaningful 

experiences in practical work situations utilizing the ser\ices ot I or designers, 

museum curators, merchandizing operations, etc. outside of the regular courses prescribed 
by the college art curriculum. Course may be repeated with consent of advisor and depart- 
ment chairperson 

32.490 UKT GALLERY* 3sem.hr*. 

\ itodj ot works bv classical and contemporar> artists in selected museums in 
York and Pennsvlvania. with emphasis on technique, visual concepts, aesthetics and his- 
torical context in both 2-d and 3-d forms, and study of the role of the art museum 
culturally and educationally. Visits to selected galleries are followed b> in-depth study on 
campus together with special problems assigned in conjunction with the college an gallery 
arranged bv its director. 

32.495 ART AND CULTURE OF FRANCI 3 sem. hrv 

A study-tour of France with specific attention to French Art seen in relation I 
il and cultural environment Visits na- ill be made to places of artistic and cultural interest 
in and around Paris, in the Loire \ alley and in Southwestern France. 

•Courses ottered ever\ other vear or as sufficient student enrollments are obtained. 



BIOLOGICAL AND ALLIED 
HEALTH SCIENCES 

FACULTY 

Professor] James E. Cole (Program Director. Allied Health Services) Phillip A. Farber. 
Michael Herbert. Craig L. Himes (Chairperson). Julius R kroschewskv. Thomas R 
Manle>. Louis V. Mingrone, Donald D. Rabb. Joseph P. Vaughan; Associate Profe- 
George J. Gellos, Stanley A. Rhodes and Robert G. Sagar. Judith Downing; Assistant 
Professors. John R. Fletcher and Frederick C. Hill. 

■IOLOGY: 

Vrts and Sciences major for the B.S. degree: 

Kolog) 50.210, 220. 332. 351, 380; 50.331 or 361 or 364; 50.371 or 372; Chen-. 
52.101 and or 102; 113. 231, 232 and two additional Chemistry COW* 
sem hrs.) to be selected from 52 122. 233. 311. 312. Phvsics 54 111. 112 or 54 211. 
212. Mathematics (6 or more cr. hrs.) 53.141. 123 or 53.125, 141 or 53 125. 126. 
foreign language: At least one semester of anv Foreign language at the 102 level 
or above 

BIOI OCY: 

Vrts and Sciences major for the BV. degree: 

Biolog) 50.21 50.371 or 372; Chemistr) 52.101 and or 

13, 211, 23 Mathematics 4 scm hrs to be selected from 

53 123, 141. 171, 172; Foreign language Vt least one semester o\ anv Foreign 
I anguagc Si the 102 level or above 

Descriptions of allied health curricula (medical technology dental hvgicne. pre-occupational 
therapv. pre-phvsical therapv and pre-c>totechnolog> ) are listed under the School of 
Professional Studies. 



Biol <>(,\ \\D \i I II I) III \i in S< IENCES 79 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

(Code 50) 

Courses marked + may be applied toward General Education. 

50.101 GENERAL BIOLOGY 1 + 3 sem. hrs. 

Major concepts and principles of biology relating to man and his environment. Lec- 
ture and discussion. Not for biology majors. 

50.102 GENERAL BIOLOGY II + 3 sem. hrs. 

Biology studied from the ecological, evolutionary, neural and behavioral perspective 
with emphasis on man. Not for Biology majors. 
Prerequisite: 50.101 or consent of instructor. 

50.103 QUEST BIOLOGY 3 sem. hrs. 

The study of the biological and environmental relationships with man as a par- 
ticipant for survival in a natural setting, i.e. to become a part of that setting. 

50.107 MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY t 1 sem. hr. 

Programmed instruction. Roots, prefixes and suffixes of medical terms are studied, 
enabling the student to comprehend medical and biological terminology. Required of all 
health science biology majors and students in medical technology and cytotechnology. 
Recommended for other biology majors and other students in the health sciences. Should 
be taken during the freshman year. 

50.111 GENERAL BIOLOGY I: LABORATORY t 1 sem. hr. 

An optional audio-tutorial laboratory program. 2 hrs. laboratory/ wk. 

50.173 ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY I 3 sem. hrs. 

An integrated study of the structure and function of the human body designed prin- 
cipally for students in health sciences. The Cell, Integration of Structure and Function, 
Skeletal System, Muscular System, Nervous System, Senses; Skin, Circulatory System and 
Lymphatic System. 2 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. laboratory per week. Required for students in 
Nursing and Danville P.N.Y 
(Not applicable toward a major in biology.) 

50.174 ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY II 3 sem. hrs. 

Respiratory System, Digestive System, Metabolism, Nutrition, Excretion, Reproduc- 
tive System, The Endocrine Glands. 2 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. laboratory per week. Required for 
students in Nursing and Danville P.N.'s. 
(Not applicable toward a major in biology.) 
Prerequisite: 50.173. 

50.210 GENERAL ZOOLOGY ? 4 sem. hrs. 

Fundamental principles of zoology as applied to representative groups of invertebrate 
and vertebrate animals. Laboratory work emphasizes the development, anatomy, physiology 
and behavior of representative animals. 3 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. laboratory/ week. 

50.220 GENERAL BOTANY t 4 sem. hrs. 

Fundamental principles of taxonomy, anatomy, morphology, physiology and genetics 
as applied to the plant kingdom. 3 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. laboratory/ week. 

50.230 HUMAN SEXUALITY t 3 sem. hrs. 

Anthropological, biological, physiological and sociological aspects of sex. Discussion 
of sexual competence and the role of sex in society. 
(Not applicable toward a major in biology.) 



SO BlOl 00) vsi> \l I II D Ml M III S< II s« is 

MJ11 INVERTEBRATE ZOOLOGY lasmtaa, 

I he principal phyla «»l invertebrate ■fU m ah arc studied in relation to their anatorm. 
Classification, and their roles in t he ecosvstenis in which the> participate 3 hrs IcctU' 

hrs laborator) week 
Prerequisite SOullO. 

50.312 VERTEBRATI ZOOI ()(.N I team, hrs 

I he biologv oi the \ertehrate animal, emphasizing morphology, ph\su». 
cmbrvologv and behavior. fvolutionarv and ecological aspects ot each dai 
work with Irving and preserved specimens to tamilian/e the student with representative indi- 
viduals oi the major classes ol this group. 3 hrs. lecture. 2 hrs laboratory week. 
Prerequisite: 50.210. 

50.321 ( OMPARATH E BIOLOG1 Of NONA w ULAR PLANTS I stm hrs 
PhylogenetlC Stud) Ol major non-vascular plants with emphasis on development. 

structure, reproduction and selected ecological aspects. 2 hr. lecture. 3 hrs. laboratory M 
Prerequisite: 50.220. 

50.322 COMPARA I IN E Biol 0(,\ ov VASCU1 \K PI VMS 3 sem hrs. 
Structure, function and biosynthesis of the major chemical constituents found in 

vascular plants. 2 hrs. lecture. 3 hrs. laboratorv week 
Prerequisite: 50.220. 

50.331 EMBRYOLOGY 3 sem. hrs. 

Patterns, processes and principles ol animal development. laboratorv studies com- 
prise maturation and organization of germ cells, and developmental processes o\ a number 
ol animal types, including several types o\ living embryos. 2 hrs. lecture. 3 hrs. laboratorv 
week. 
Prerequisite: 50.101 or 210 or consent ol the instructor. 

50.332 GENETICS 3 sem. hrs. 
Mechanisms of hcreditv in animals and plants; Mendelian inheritance probability, 

linkage, crossing over, chromosomal modifications, nucleic acids and gene action. 3 hrs. lec- 
ture. 2 hrs. laboratorv week. I aboratory hours ma\ Vary. 
Prerequisite: 50.210. 

50.333 HUMAN (.IM llCS 3 sem. hrs. 
Principles o\ human genetics and their application to problems in biologv. medicine. 

psychology, special education, anthropology, and sociology Open to majors and non-ma- 
jors. 3 hrs. lecture week. 
Prerequisite: 50.101 or 210. 

50.341 MICROBIOLOGY ) seaa.hr*. 

Cytology, nutrition, cultivation, and metabolism ot bacteria, viruses and tungi. their 
distribution In nature and then beneficial and harmful activities I hr lecture. 4h- 

torj week. 

Prerequisite: a hours of laboratory tcience, 

MJ42 MEDICAL MICROBIOLOGY 3 sem. hrs. 

\n introduction to the organisms that produce disease in man 1 he material em- 

phasizes basic microbiology, chmcal bacteriology, virologj and immunolog) as applied to 

disease processes, diagnosis and prevention 3 hrs lecture. 2 hrs laboratorv week 

M343 immi NOl OG1 3 sem hrs. 

\ lecture course responses to inlectuuis agents, immunochemistrv . tmmunobu 

chmcal laboratory applications, tissue transplantation and blood transfusion 3 hrs. lecture 

discussion week. 

Prerequisite: Recommend 50.342 



Biology \\i> Am ied Hi \i rw s< hm is hi 

50.351 GENERAL ECOLOGY 3 Mm. hrs. 

Principles and concepts pertaining to energy How; limiting factors, habitat studies, 
succession patterns, and population studies at the species, interspecies and community level. 
2 Ins. lecture, 3 hrs. laboratory week. 
Prerequisite: 50.210 and 220 or consent of instructor. 

50.352 FIELD ZOOLOGY + 3 sem. hrs. 

Common vertebrates (excluding birds) of North America, with emphasis on the 
observation collection, and recognition of local fauna. 2 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. laboratory/ 
week. 
Prerequisite: 50.210 or consent of instructor. 

50.353 FRESHWATER BIOLOGY t 3 sem. hrs. 

The biology of streams, lakes and ponds; their relationship to health and welfare. 2 
hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. laboratory/week. 

50.354 SOCIAL IMPLICATIONS OF BIOLOGY 3 sem. hrs. 

Biology as related to contemporary problems; population, food, environments, etc. 
The course is directed toward concern with the state of biology in modern times. 3 hrs. lec- 
ture/discussion/week. 
Not applicable toward a major in biology. 

50.361 COMPARATIVE VERTEBRATE ANATOMY 3 sem. hrs. 

A comparative study of the chordates, emphasizing the vertebrate classes, particu- 
larly structure, morphogenesis, functional adaptations and evolution trends. In the labora- 
tory, emphasis is placed on the lamprey, shark, cat, sheep heart and brain, and living frog 
larvae, rats and rabbits. 2 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. laboratory/ week. 
Prerequisite: 50.101 or 210 or consent of instructor. 

50.362 PLANT ANATOMY 3 sem. hrs. 

Recent concepts of plant anatomy and historical consideration of classical re- 
searchers. Structure, function, growth and morphogenesis of the vascular plants. Composi- 
tion and growth of meristems and the phenomena of subsequent tissue differentiation to 
increase appreciation of developmental events. The study of anatomical organization is 
described by developmental and comparative methods in order to explain important cell, 
tissue and organ relationships. 2 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. laboratory/ week. 
Prerequisite: 50.220. 

50.363 PLANT TAXONOMY t 3 sem. hrs. 

Identification and classification of seed plants represented in local flora. 2 hrs. lec- 
ture, 3 hrs. laboratory/ week. 
Prerequisite: 50.220 or 102 or consent of the instructor. 

50.364 VERTEBRATE HISTOLOGY 3 sem. hrs. 

A study of vertebrate tissues from various body systems. Laboratory studies include 
the use of prepared slides, color photomicrographs and basic histological techniques. 2 hrs. 
lecture, 3 hrs. laboratory/week. 
Prerequisite: 50.210. Recommended prerequisite: 50.361. 

50.365 HISTOLOGICAL AND HISTOCHEMICAL TECHNIQUES 3 sem. hrs. 

A laboratory course designed to provide theory and practice in the use of histological 
and histochemical techniques. Fixation, preparation embedding, sectioning and staining of 
various animal tissues. 1 hr. lecture/ 4 hrs. laboratory/ week. 
Prerequisite: 50.364 and Chemistry 52.211 or 231 or consent of instructor. 



: ocn KHD \ H H Sen m is 

SUM tNATOMI iND PHYSIOLOGY: HEAD, 

NF ( K \M) I HON \\ 3 srm. hrv 

taatomy, physiology, neurolog} and development of the head, neck and thorax. 
Special emphasis is given to relationship bet ween speech and hearing. 3 hr. lecture dis- 
cussion week Some special laboratory periods per semester for students admitted 
mumcations Disorders major 

Nor applicable toward a major m biology. 

50.371 VERTEBRATE PHYSIOLOG1 m. hrs. 
I he function* ol tissues, organ! and systems and their chemical integration F.m- 

phasis on mammalian circulation, respiration, digestion, metabolism, renal function, re- 
production, and endorcines. 2 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs laborator> week. 
Prerequisite: 50.210 or consent of instructor. 

50.372 PLANT PHYSIOLOGY Wm. hrs 
An introduction to plant function including discussions of water relations, car- 
bohydrate metabolism and translocation, photosynthesis, mineral nutrition, plant growth 
hormones and growth and development. 2 hrs. lecture. 3 hrs. laboratorv ■ 

Prereguisih Chemistry 52.211 or 231. or consent of instructor. 

50.380 BIOLOGY SEMINAR I sem. hr. 

An informal discussion course for consideration of important topics in modern 
biology. One hour per week. 

50.390 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN BIOLOGY I 1-3 sem. hrs 

To acquaint students with the techniques of scientific research, data collection and 
analysis by engaging in a program of scientific research with the aid of a faculty member 
(or members). 
Prerequisite: 12 hours in the biological sciences or consent of instructor. 

[sec I 

50.391 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN BIOLOGY II 1-3 sem. hrs 
To acquaint students with the techniques ol scientific research, data collection and 

analysis by engaging in a program of scientific research with the aid o\ a faculty member 
(or members) [see section 7 5] 

50.411 RADIATION BIOLOGY 4 ma hrs 

Effects of radiation on living organisms; nuclear structure; fundamental propert . 
radiation; physical, chemical and genetic effects on plants and animals from cells to whole 
organisms; application o\ radiochemicals in biological studies. 
Prerequisite: (hem. 52.232 or 233; Math 53.141: or consent of instructor. 

50.431 EVOLUTION 3 sem. hrs 

\ Bttld) ot the major problems ol the theorv o\ evolution and contributions toward 
then solutions made bv genetics, paleontology, systematic! and ccologv 3 hrs lecture « 

Prcrcquisi:, 

50.441 C N I <>I <>(.N \M) CYTOGENETICS 3 sem. hrs. 

Structure and function ol Cytoplasmic and nuclear organelles ol cells I aboratorv 

studies include techniques tor cell, chromosome, and tissue preparation. 2 hrs. lecture. 2 hrs. 

laboratory week 

Prerequisite 50.332 or 333. ( hem 52.211 or 231 or consent of instr:, 

50.454 ETHOLOG1 3 sem. hrs. 

Description and classification Ol behavior (animal), its evolution and biological func- 
tion Mechanisms underlying behavior, especiallv species-tv pica! behavior, are emphasized. 3 
hrs lecture. 2 hrs laboratorv per week 

Prerequisite 50,210 and37l or consent of Instructor, 



( III MIM KY K3 

50.455 ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY 3 sim. hrs. 

Practical application of knowledge of micro-organisms; their effects on our environ- 
ment; methods of control; sanitation regulations and testing procedures. Field trips taken 
when practical. I hr. lecture, 4 hrs. laboratory/ week. 
Prerequisite: 50.341 or consent of instructor. 

50.457 ENTOMOLOGY 3 sem. hrs. 

Study of the anatomical features of insects which enable the student to properly 
classify insects as to order, family, genera, and species. A technique course providing the 
student opportunity to collect, mount, and properly display insects for study. 3 month 
collecting period. May to August, and 3-week lab. for study of gross morphology and iden- 
tification. 2 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. laboratory per week. Equivalent to a minimum of five 
hours/ week including laboratory. 

50.459 ORNITHOLOGY 3 sem. hrs. 

Biology of birds and the study of bird identification in the field by song and sight. 
Study of birds of this region in relation to migration, time of arrival and nesting. 2 hrs. lec- 
ture, 3 hrs. laboratory/ week. May be offered between close of Spring semester and begin- 
ning Summer Sessions. Some study off-campus may be required. 

50.463 BIOLOGICAL PHOTOGRAPHIC TECHNIQUES 3 sem. hrs. 

Theory and practice of photography as applied to biology, including negative and 
print making, gross specimen photography, copying, transparencies, film-strips, autora- 
diography, nature work in close-ups, photomicrography, thesis illustrations and other spe- 
cial techniques. 2 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. laboratory/week. Additional laboratory hours may be 
required. 

50.472 CELL PHYSIOLOGY 3 sem. hrs. 

Application of physical and chemical principles to cellular processes; biochemistry of 
cellular constituents; physiochemical environment; bioenergetics; intermediate metabolism. 3 
hrs. lecture/ discussion/ week. 
Prerequisite: 12 hours of Biology and Chemistry 52.211 or 52.231; or consent of instructor. 

CHEMISTRY 

FACULTY 

Professors Roy D. Pointer (Chairperson), Barrett W. Benson, Clyde S. Noble, Norman E. 
White; Associate Professors Wayne P. Anderson, Lawrence L. Mack, Rex E. Selk; 
Assistant Professors Margaret M.L. Chu, Andrew L. Colb, Daniel C. Pantaleo. 

CHEMISTRY: 

Arts and Sciences major for the B.S. degree: 

Chemistry 52.102, 113, 122, 231, 232, 311, 312, 322; 421 or 441; 422, 490, 492; 
Mathematics 53.125, 126; 171 or 172; 225; Physics 54.211, 212, 310; reading 
knowledge of Scientific German or Russian. 

(Note: Students who want ACS certification upon graduation must complete the re- 
quirements for the B.S. degree as given above.) 

CHEMISTRY: 

Arts and Sciences major for the B.A. degree: 

Chemistry 52.102, 113, 122, 231, 232, 311, 312, 322, 490; Mathematics 53.125, 126, 
171 or 172, 225; Physics 54.211, 212. 

(Note: Requirements for the major for the B.S. in Ed. degree are found in the section 
on Secondary Education, School of Professional Studies.) 



U \ (ill RM 



The Departmen nistry is recognized b\ th, 

m ee ting the standards for undergraduate education m < 

■■al I rami' \ tciety I his recognition is tigni) ttudenu who u 

graduation teek to enter graduate M hool. medical school, or an industrial position in 
Chemistry Students who meet all requirements of the major in chemistr\ for the B.S degree 
mified by the Department of the national office of th n graduation, they 

thereupon become eligible for membership in the Sodet) without the usual two-year waiting 
period 

Students who are interested in pursuing careers in busb I iustr\ after a 

chemistry baccalaureate are invited to disCUSS proper course selection with members of the 
chemistry faculty. B\ completing the course and admission prerequc :ud\ 

concurrently with a chemistry BA program, all course requirements for an M B A degree can 
be met m only one additional year of postgraduate study. 



col rsi ni.se RJPTIONS 
(Code 52) 

Courses marked + may be applied toward General Education. 

52.101 INTRODUCTORY C HEMISTRY + 3 sem. hrv 
An introduction to fundamental concepts and principles of chemistry, including 

aspects o\ environmental chemistry. No previous chemistry background assumed. 3 hours 
class week. 

52.102 COLLEGE CHEMISTRY + 4 sem. hrv 
Basic principles of chemistry including descriptive and theoretical topics of general 

chemistry as recommended by the American Chemical Society. Recommended for students 
with a strong high school science background and an above average math S \ I 
hours class week. 

Prerequisite: 52.101 or satisfactory performance on a department-admin. ::ed 

exam and written permission of the Chemistry Department. 

52.108 PHYSIOLOGIC AI (HEMISTRY + 4 sem hrs. 

\ survey (it the essentials ol organic and biochemistry. 4 hours class week. 
Prerequisite: 52.101 or 102. 113, and permission of the Chairperson of the ■ 

Sursing. 

52.113 (HEMISTRY LABORATORY + ] sem hrs 

An introduction to theory and practice o! fundamental chemistry laboratory tech- 
niques, including qualitative analysis. 4 hours week: I class, 3 laboratory 
Prerequisite: either 52.101 or 102. concurrent or completed. 

52.122 QUANTITATIVE ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY 4 ^m hrs 

I undamental principles ol quantitative chemical analysis Utilizes and 

modern instrumental techniques I aboratory skills and calculations ot quantitative analysis 
are stressed. 7 hours week. 3 class. 4 laboratory. 

io2. 113. 

52.211 INTRODUCTORY ORGANIC CHEMISTRY 1 4 sem hrs 

\ Birve) ol functional group organic chemistry With emphasis on those fundamentals 
ol Structure, stereochemistry, and reaction mechanisms which are desirable tor an under- 
standing ol the Chemistry Ol biomoleCUks. Students who contemplate further work in 
chemist ry should take til No! open to Chemistry maiors. b hours 

week J class. 3 labor at or\ 
102. 113. 



C "in Nt is r m Coi RSI s HS 

52.231 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY 1 f 4 sem. hrs. 

Fundamental principles of organic chemistry. Molecular structure, stercochenmti \ 
and reactions of hydrocarbons and their derivatives. Reaction mechanisms and syntheses 
emphasized. 7 hours week: 3 class, 4 laboratory. 
Prerequisite: 52.102. 113. 

52.232 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II + 4 sem. hrs. 

A continuation of 52.231, with emphasis on reactions of common functional groups, 
synthesis and mechanism. Modern spectroscopic methods and the interpretation of spectra 
introduced. 7 hours/ week: 3 class, 4 laboratory. 
Prerequisite: 52.231. 

52.233 INTRODUCTORY BIO-ORGANIC CHEMISTRY | 4 sem. hrs. 

The organic chemistry of biomolecules with emphasis on the structure and chemical 
transformations of proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleic acids. 6 hours/ week: 3 class, 
3 laboratory. 
Prerequisite: 52.211 or 52.232. 

52.311 PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY I 4 sem. hrs. 

Study of chemical thermodynamics with an introduction to quantum and statistical 
mechanics; kinetic-molecular theory of gases; the laws of thermodynamics; Gibbs free 
energy and equilibrium electrochemistry. 7 hours/ week: 3 class, 4 laboratory. 
Prerequisite: 52.102, 113; 54.211 or 111; 53.125, 126. 

52.312 PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY II 4 sem. hrs. 

Continuation of 52.311; Schroedinger equation; molecular orbital theory; 
spectroscopy; rates and mechanisms of reactions. 7 hours/ week: 3 class, 4 laboratory. 
Prerequisite: 52.311; 54.212 or 112; 53.225. 

52.322 INSTRUMENTAL ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY 4 sem. hrs. 

Theory and laboratory applications of some of the instrumental methods of analysis. 
Topics include chromatography, spectrophotometry, polarography, electro-analysis, nuclear 
magnetic resonance, and others. A laboratory-centered course. 7 hours/ week: 3 class, 4 
laboratory. 
Prerequisite: 52.311. 

52.413 PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY III 3 sem. hrs. 

Further topics in physical chemistry chosen according to student interest. Possible 
topics of study are: quantum chemistry; physical biochemistry; statistical thermodynamics; 
macromolecular chemistry. 3 hours class/ week. 
Prerequisite: 52.312. 

52.421 ADVANCED INORGANIC CHEMISTRY 3 sem. hrs. 

Selected theories and principles of inorganic chemistry are studied and applied to a 
systematic analysis of the periodic relationships and properties of the elements. 3 hours 
class/ week. 
Prerequisite: 52.312 or concurrent. 

52.422 ADVANCED LABORATORY 4 sem. hrs. 

An integration of laboratory techniques common to organic, inorganic and bio- 
chemistry research. Topics include separation, synthesis, isolation, purification and structure 
determination. Interpretation of experimental results emphasized. 8 hours/week: 2 class, 6 
laboratory. 
Prerequisite: 52.232. 322. 



sum nw \m> Information s< ibkm i 

S2433 ADVANCED ORGANIC CHEMISTS! 3 «*m. hrv 

Ivanced theory, stereochemistry and utilit> of organic I ive. inter- 

mediates emphasized. 3 hours class week. 
Frereguisiti M312 or concurrent. 

52 441 HOCHEMISTRl 3 sem. hrv 

C'hemistr> oi proteins, nucleic acids, lipids. carbohydrates; intermediary metabolism, 
introduction to en/yme chemistr>. 3 hours class ueek. 
Prerequisite \2 312 <>r concurrent. 

52.4^0 CHEMISTRY SEMINAR lsem.hr. 

52.491 INDEPENDENT Ml l)\ I - 

SPK I \I rOPH S ( HKMISTRY 1-3 sem. hrs. 

May take the form of a directed laboratory or library oriented investigation on one 

or more topics of mutual interest to student and instructor. [see section 7.5] 

52.492 INDEPENDENT STIDV II - C HEMIC AL RESEARCH 3 sem. hrv 

Laboratory investigations of selected problems for advanced students 

[see section 7.5] 

COMPUTER AND INFORMATION SCIENCE 

1 \( ( LTY: 

The Bachelor of Science degree in Computer and Information Science 
(CIS) is offered jointly by the Department of Mathematics and the School o\ 
Business. Hence the resources of the college are combined to provide for students 
wishing a computer major. 

Degree: 

The degree. Bachelor of Science in Computer and Information Science 
(CIS) will be conferred upon successful completion of the Computer and In- 
formation Science curriculum 

Objectives: 

The first objective of the program is to provide a broad educational base 
for intelligent citizenship. The core courses required will likewise proude a 
breadth of knowledge in the computer and information processing field More 
specifically each student majoring in the program will be able to select COUn 
with the guidance of an advisor, which will accomplish one or more o\ the 
following purposes: 

(a) Prepare the graduate for positions in the computer industry. 

(b) Provide specific, marketable skills in business and scientific computing 
applications. 

(c) Prepare the graduate for further study in graduate programs in com- 
puter-related fields. 

( OMF1 IER & INFORMATION S( IKN( Y. 

Interdisciplinan major for the B.S. degree: 

Required (Is Information Processus 92.250, 92 252, 92 256, 92 350, 92 452 

Required Non (is Speech 25.103 

Mltfa 53.125, 53126. 53.118, S3.123 (select any two) 
tacountinj 91 221 
i oonomia 40 21 1 

Math (Statistics) 53.141 Of 5.V241 
Restricted Efectiva in Mathematics and Computer Science 



I ( ONOMICS S7 

ECONOMICS 



DEPARTMENT: 



Professors U.S. Bawa, T.S. Saini; Associate Professors Barbara Dilworth, W.B. Lee (Chair- 
person), Robert MacMurray, R.K. Mohindru, Robert Ross; Assistant Professors Peter 
Bohling, Saleem Khan. 

ECONOMICS: 

Arts and Sciences Majors for the B.A. and B.S. degrees: 

Economics 40.21 1, 212, 31 1, 312, 346; and one of the following concentrations. 

B.A. degree, option 1, intended for general study of economics: One course from 
Economics 40.315, 423, 434, 424; one course from 40.313, 316, 317, 422; one 
course from Sociology 45.466, Economics 40.470, 490; one course from Geography 
41.221, Psychology 48.35 i, Philosophy 28.301, Biology 50.351, Political Science 
44.336, Sociology 45.316. History 42.471, 472; fifteen semester hours elective in 
economics. 

B.S. degree, intended for the student who is interested in analytical study of eco- 
nomics related to business: Business 91.221, 222, 93.343, 342, 345; twelve semester 
hours elective in economics. 

B.A. degree, option II, intended for the student whose interest is in Political 
Economy and who hopes to enter a career in some aspect of international relations 
or trade: Political Science 44.161, 336; Economics 40.460; twelve semester hours 
elective in economics; six semester hours elective in political science. (The follow- 
ing pairs of courses in economics and political science are recommended as espe- 
cially, pertinent to the purposes of Option II: 40.423 paired with 44.405; 40.422 
with 44.366; 40.433 with 44.383; 40.316 with 44.453; 40.410 with 44.336; 40.315 
with 44.326.) Study of a foreign language recommended. 

Electives in economics, business and political science in any of the options require 
the adviser's approval. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 
(Code 40) 

Courses marked + may be used toward General Education. 

40.211 PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS I | 3 sem. hrs. 

Macroeconomics: Nature of the economic problem; economic concepts; institutional 
framework; supply, demand and the market mechanism; national income accounting; de- 
termination of output and employment levels; consumption, saving and investment be- 
havior; business cycles; inflation and unemployment; monetary and fiscal institutions and 
theory; economic growth. 

40.212 PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS II t 3 sem. hrs. 

Microeconomics: Supply, demand and the price system; theory of consumer behavior 
and the firm; cost and production analyses, output and price determination; resource alloca- 
tion and determination of factor incomes under perfect and imperfect markets; current eco- 
nomic problems; international economics. 
Prerequisite: 40.211. 

40.246 BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS MATHEMATICS t 3 sem. hrs. 

Introduction to basic mathematical tools of business and economics, e.g., systems of 
linear equations, inequalities, elements of linear programming, matrix algebra, and dif- 
ferential and integral calculus. 



ONOMH S ( "I KM s 

40.31 1 INTERMEDIATE MICRO-THEOR1 \M) 

M vn u.fRi \l K ONOMH s m . hrs. 

I hci>r> o! consumer behavior and the firm, output and price determination under 
different market sv stems, pure competition, pure monopoh. oligopoly and monopolistic 
competition; production and cost analvsis; allocation of resource and distribution of in- 
come, comparison of behaviors <>t competitive, monopolistic and oligopolistic product and 
resource markets, constrained and non-constrained optimization techniques and their ap- 
plications to business decisions and business practices; welfare economics 
Prerequisites: 40.211, 212. 246. 

40.312 INTERMEDIATE MACRO-ECONOMH IHEOR1 3 sem. hrv 

National income analysis, theory of income determination, employment and price 
levels; monetary and fiscal institutions, theory and policy; investment, interest and demand 
for money; business cycles; inflation and unemployment; national debt; macrocconomic 
equilibrium; prices, wages and aggregate supply, economic growth, foreign trade and 
balance of payments; economic policy. 
Prerequisites: 40.211. 212. 246. 

40.313 LABOR K ONOMH S I MS* hrv 

Economics of the labor market; supply of and demand for labor; nature and the 
of wages; productivity and inflation. Unionism; historical development; theories of labor 
movements; trade union governance; collective bargaining; government intervention and 
public policy. 
Prerequisite: 40.212. 

40.315 BUSINESS AND GOVERNMENT 3 sem. hrs. 
A survey of government policies for maintaining competition, for substituting regula- 
tion in place of competition and for substituting public for private enterprise; test! 
various government policies in the light of economic theory and historical experiew 
Prerequisite: 40.212. 

40.316 I'RBAN E< ONOMH S I sem. hrs. 
The application of economic theory and recent empirical findings to urban resource 

use. Problems analyzed include employment, housing, education, transportation, pollution 
and minorities 
Prerequisite 40.212. 

40.317 POPULATION AND RESOURCE PROBLEMS 3 sem. hrs. 

Classical theories o\ population growth, recent economics models oi population 
relating natural resources, capital accumulation, technological change. Population problems 
in North American. European and developing countries. Recent trends in birth and death 
rates as tactors in population growth. Study ol measures o\ population and labor I 
their distribution bv age, lex, occupation, regions; techniques for protecting population 
levels 
Prerequisite 40.212. 

40.346 BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS STATISTICS I 3 sem. hrs. 

Descriptive statistics, averages, dispersion, elements ol probability, index num." 
time series, introduction to regression and correlation analvsis. theorv o\ estimation and 
testing ot hvpothesis as applied to business and economic problems 
212. 

40.400 INTRODUCTION TO ECONOMETRICS 3 srm. hrs. 

I he application ol modern statistical methods to economic problems; time Kl 
I Sectional analysil ol measurements ot demand and costs, macro-economic models, in- 
come distribution and growth model 
212 



I . IIMIMII S ( Ol KM S X9 

40.410 PUBLIC FINANCK 3 Mm. hrs. 

Analysis of revenues and expenditures of local, state and national government in 
light of micro- and macro-theory; criteria and models of government services; subsidies, 
etc., principles of taxation, public borrowing and public debt management; impact ol fiscal 
and budgetary policy on resource and income allocation, internal price and employment 
stability; the rate of growth and world economy. 
Prerequisite: 40.212. 

40.413 MONEY AND BANKING 3 sem. hrs. 

The historical background and development of monetary practices and principles of 
banking with special attention to commercial banking and credit regulations, and current 
monetary and banking development. 
Prerequisite: 40.212. 

40.422 CONTRASTING ECONOMIES 3 sem. hrs. 

Theories of capitalism and socialism with special emphasis on Marxian theory. Com- 
parison of theoretical and actual performance of capitalism, socialism and communism. 
Prerequisite: 40.212. 

40.423 HISTORY OF ECONOMIC THOUGHT 3 sem. hrs. 

Survey of economic theories propounded in the past and their effect on present-day 
thinking about economic, business and political systems. The surplus value theory; eco- 
nomic planning as part of government responsibility; relation of family budgets to Engel's 
Law; government responsibility for employment and rent control. 
Prerequisite: 40.212. 

40.424 ECONOMIC HISTORY OF THE WESTERN WORLD 3 sem hrs. 

Comparative analysis of the economic theory of Europe and the United States, with 
particular attention to the interplay of changes in business, financial and labor institutions, 
products and production, adaptations to resource differences, and conflicting economic doc- 
trines. 
Prerequisite: 40.212. 

40.333 INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS 3 sem. hrs. 

Pure theory of international trade. Gains from trade; free trade and protection; 
balance of payments; foreign exchange and capital movements; the dollar and the interna- 
tional monetary system and international liquidity shortage. 
Prerequisite: 40.212. 

40.434 ECONOMIC GROWTH OF UNDERDEVELOPED AREAS 3 sem. hrs. 

A study of stagnating economies: theories of underdevelopment; operative resistances 
to economic growth; role of capital, labor, population growth, and technological advance; 
development planning and trade in development setting. 
Prerequisite: 40.212. 

40.446 BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS STATISTICS II 3 sem. hrs. 

Sampling and sampling distributions; probability; tests of hypothesis; decision mak- 
ing;, simple correlation analysis; contingency tables; analysis of variance; computer applica- 
tions; designs of experiments. 
Prerequisite: 40.212, 40.346. 

40.460 ADVANCED POLITICAL ECONOMY 3 sem. hrs. 

Application of economic and political models of social decision-making to historical 
problems from local through international levels; evaluation of market; political and mixed 
techniques in particular areas from the 18th through the 20th centuries. 
Prerequisite: 40.212. 



Gl ISH 

4<.4fth RESEARCH METHODS IN THE SOCIAL SCIENCES 3 sem. hrv 

I his course is offered in the department of sooologv and described with the so- 
ciolog) com 

Prerequisite t<>r uudenls of economics. 40346 ami permit panmem. 

40.470 SENIOR SEMINAR ! sem. hrv 

Discussion ol current literature on economic theorv and economic policy. Each 
student reads one journal article a week on which he she writes a report and makes a 
seminar presentation 

niOT standing or permission of the instructor 

40.490 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN ECONOMICS 1-3 sem. hrs. 

This course is offered to provide students with an opportunity to receive indi- 
vidualized instruction as he or she pursues an in-depth inquirv into previously specified sub- 
ject matter oi special interest within the field of economics. Topic and outline must be 
developed with a faculty sponsor and approved by the department during the preceding 
semester of residence. Refer to section 7.5. 



ENGLISH 

FACULTY: 

Professors Louis F. Thompson (Chairperson), Charles C. Kopp, Susan Rusinko. Gerald H 
Strauss; Associate Professors M. Dale Anderson, William M Baillie. William D Eisenberg. 
Ronald A. Ferdock, Lawrence B. Fuller, Ervene F. Gulley. Alva W. Rice. Richard C. 
Savage; Assistant Professors Virginia A. Duck. Nancy E. Gill. Margaret Read I auer. 
Dorothy (). McHale. Robert G. Meeker, Riley B. Smith. 

ENGLISH: 

Arts and Sciences major for the B.A. degree: 

English 20 363: 20.31 I or 20.312 or 20.41 1; 20.488 or 20.489 or 20 4% 

Three courses chosen from 20.120. 121. 220. 221,223 

One course chosen from 20.251, 280. 333. 360. 361, 362. J70 

Ihrce additional 300-level or 400-level English courses, exdlld 

Certificate in Journalism 

I he Certificate in Journalism implies introductory preparation for publication 
activity in teaching or in business It is granted by the College when the student has com- 
pleted three courses chosen from 20.105, 205, 255, ; 04. 305. and at least tu 
factor) service as | statt member oi the Campus lout'. Obiter, ox Olympian. 

(Note Requirements for the major fof the B S in Ed. degree arc found in the section 
on Second. irv I 'ducation. School ol Professional Studies. Section (5 

( oi rsi des< RirnoNS 

[Code 20) 

ENGLISH COMPOSITION: 1 he student must take r ngl.sh 20.101 at. 

semester hours) or. it he or she is selected on basis of admission criteria. Fnglish 20.104 

only (three semester hours) 

20.101 COMPOSITION 1 3 sem. hrv 

Studv intended to produce proficicncv in reading and writing. Frequent themes; prin- 
ciples o\ rhetoric and grammar 



I NG1 isii COI RSES 91 

20.104 HONORS COMPOSITION 3 sem. hrs. 

Experiences similar to those of 20.101 but reserved for freshmen who have been 
exempted from 20.101 on the basis of admissions criteria. Students who successfully com- 
plete 20.104 are exempt from 20.200 and 201. 

20.105 INTRODUCTION TO JOURNALISM + 3 sem. hrs. 

Emphasis on principles and techniques of reporting. Development of journalism; 
theory and practice of its principles; organizational patterns of news stories; methods of 
gathering news and writing various types of news stories; fundamentals of editing. 

20.106 WRITING FOR QUEST 3 sem. hrs. 

(Summer Quest students only) 

20.111 LANGUAGE AND SOCIAL INTERACTION + 3 sem. hrs. 

A survey of the history, varieties, forms and purposes of language and of the ways in 
which it may be used, understood, and described. Not applicable toward a major in English. 

20.120 WORLD LITERATURE I + 3 sem. hrs. 

Important literary works of the Western world — classic Greece to the Renaissance 
in terms of genres and literary movements. 

20.121 WORLD LITERATURE II t 3 sem. hrs. 

Important literary works of the Western world from the 17th century to the present. 

20.131 THE BIBLE AS LITERATURE + 3 sem. hrs. 

Examines literary types found in Old and New Testaments and their profound in- 
fluence on Western culture. Not applicable toward a major in English. 

20.151 INTRODUCTION TO LITERATURE + 3 sem. hrs. 

A basic course exploring literature as experience and the techniques by which it com- 
municates in short story, novel, drama, and poem. Not applicable toward a major in 
English. 

20.153 FOLKLORE f 3 sem. hrs. 

A survey of such traditional forms of oral literature as epic, ballad, folksong, folk- 
tale, and superstitions., examined in terms of origin, transmission, and influence on litera- 
ture. Not applicable toward a major in English. 

20.200 WRITING PROFICIENCY EXAMINATION 3 sem. hrs. 

A series of compositions written under examination conditions on topics provided by 
the staff. Faculty consultation and a writing laboratory are available for students in the 
course. 
Prerequisite: 20.101. 

20.201 COMPOSITION II 3 sem. hrs. 

An alternative to English 200, Writing Proficiency Examination. Includes a series of 
themes, a long paper, and practice in library research to reinforce and expand skills ac- 
quired in Composition I. 
Prerequisite: 20.101. 

20.205 FEATURE WRITING + 3 sem. hrs. 

Methods of writing articles for newspapers and magazines. Techniques of gathering 
information and developing various types of feature articles. Study and discussion of 
published articles. 
Prerequisite: 20.105. 



RSES 

:o.:20 RKiiisii WRITERS 1 1 3 sem. hrs. 

Surve) "i Klectiom from Chaucer, Spenter, Shakesf) I *• . Miton. 

Dryden, Swiit. Pope, Boswell, and Johnson 

20 221 BRITISH WRITERS D 4 a. hrs. 

Surve) ol selections from Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Sheik 
Browning, Arnold. Shaw, Yeats, and Eliot. 

20.222 AMERICAN LITERATURE 1 1 Issmhn. 
Surve) ol American literature from its Colonial beginnings through the Civil V 

with emphasis on the writers of the American Renaissance 

20.223 AMERICAN LITERATURE n t "hrs. 
COntmues 20.222, Covering major writers and significant social and literary n 

ments to the present day. 

20.251 LITERARY GENRES + 3 sem hrs. 

I iter ar\ form as a vehicle tor expression of ideas. 

20.255 MASS MEDIA: PRINT f 3 sem. hrs 

Survey of current print media with emphasis on evolution, forms, and content, and 
social political impact of print media; relationships with other media; print freedom and the 

law. 

20.280 POETRY + 3 sem. hrs. 

Designed to permit student exploration of the genre, under guidance of instructor. 
The nature of poetry — its aims, how it is created, historical and individual changes and 
variations in manner and matter. 

20.301 CREATIVE WRITING 3 «*m. hrs 

Original creative work in one or more of the genres, as determined hy the instructor, 
critical analysis b) the instructor and the class in group discussion 

20.302 ADVANCED COMPOSITION 3 sem hrs 

Designed 1 or F : nglish majors and minors, though other students are admitted \ 
to develop in the student a greater mastery over the elements ol effective writing Attention 
is given to the prohlem of evaluating writing. 
Prerequisite: Junior Standing. 

20.304 EDITING 3 sem hrs. 

Emphasizes how to improve writing submitted foi publication in newspa|i 

magazines, brochures; how to guard against hbel and violations Of ethics and good ' 
and how to check lor accuracv ol submitted material. 

Prerequisite: 20.105. Vol applicable toward an Arts and Sciences major not . 
Education minor m English. 

20.305 JOURNALISM SEMINAR wm hrs. 

Independent Stud) and practical training in covering college and communttv events 

to help the student understand techniques ol in-depth reporting and learn ho* to poJ 
news nor) in terms ol structure, analysis, and language 

quisiu 20.103 and eithei -' or permission of btstru 

towards an Arts and Sciences major n location minor in English. 

20.311 STRUCTURE OF ENGLISH 3 seas. hrs. 

\ descriptive studv ol the phonologv. morphologv. syntax, and graphic formula 
modem American I nglish 

qtasite: Junior uanding. 



Engi imi Coi rses 93 

20.312 HISTORY OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE 3 Mm. hrs. 

A descriptive study ol the causes and effects ol phonemic, morphological, syntactic, 
and semantic change in the English language from the Anglo-Saxon conquest to the 
present. 
Prerequisite: Junior standing. 

20.331 IDEAS IN LITERATURE 3 sem. hrs. 

Examines such recurrent concepts in literature as the conflict between freedom and 
tate, the place of good and evil in the scheme of things. 

20.332 RUSSIAN LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION f 3 sem. hrs. 

An introduction to the "golden age" of Russian literature from Pushkin to Sho- 
lokhov. Readings in English of novels, poems, plays, and short stories. Attention given to 
ideas reflected in the works as well as to the medium through which they are dramatized. 

20.333 LATER AMERICAN PROSE j 3 sem. hrs. 

Study of prose works of American literature, both fiction and non-fiction, from the 
late 19th century to the present, emphasizing literary merit and social significance. Such 
writers as Riis, Steffens, Sinclair, Allen, E.B. White, Thurber, Baldwin, Ellison, Steinbeck, 
Barrio, Momaday included. 

20.334 MAJOR AMERICAN WRITERS f 3 sem. hrs. 

Study of major American writers instrumental in shaping and interpreting the 
American experience. Writers included will vary with each presentation of the course. 

20.336, 337, 338 MAJOR BRITISH WRITERS 3 sem. hrs. 

A study of major British writers instrumental in shaping and interpreting British 
literature and the British mind and experience. Writers included will vary with each 
presentation of the course. 

20.341 EARLY AND MIDDLE ENGLISH LITERATURE t 3 sem. hrs. 

A study of Beowulf and other Old English works in translation and of medieval 
chronicles and romances including Sir Gawain and the Green Knight and Le Morte 
a" Arthur. 

20.342 16TH CENTURY LITERATURE \ 3 sem. hrs. 

The non-dramatic prose and verse of the period, emphasizing the last quarter of the 
century. The humanists: Erasmus, More, Castiglione, Elyot, Ascham; Renaissance forms 
and ideas in Lyly, Sidney, Spenser, Daniel, Drayton, Shakespeare, Marlowe, Chapman, 
Greene, and others. 

20.343 17TH CENTURY LITERATURE t 3 sem. hrs. 

Poetry and prose, beginning with Jonson. The rival traditions of Donne and Jonson 
in such poets as Herbert, Vaughan, Quarles, Cowley, Herrick, and Marvell. Principal prose 
writers: Burton, Browne, Taylor, Fuller, Baxter, Bunyan, and Dryden. 

20.344 18TH CENTURY LITERATURE t 3 sem. hrs. 

Survey of literature of the Augustan Age in England: Addison and Steele, Swift, 
Pope, Boswell, and Johnson; forerunners of the Romantic Revival; beginnings of the British 
novel; the plays of Addison, Steele, Sheridan, and Goldsmith. 

20.345 19TH CENTURY LITERATURE f 3 sem. hrs. 

Covers the major poets such as Wordsworth, Keats, Tennyson, Arnold, as well as 
major prose writers Hazlitt, Lamb, DeQuincey, Peacock, Newman, Huxley, Carlyle, and 
others. 



94 I HOI tSH ( 01 Ksis 

20.351 LITERATURE FOR CHILDREN m. hrv 

I \amination and study of literature tor children, with emphasis on criteria for select- 
ing literature tor the classroom and the library . suggestions tor presenting literary works in 
the elemental) classroom, and b.isic literary concepts 

P re r eq u isite: Junior Handing. Not applicable toward an Arts and Sciences mc ish 

20.352 LITERATURE FOR ADOLESCENTS 3 s*m. hrv 

I \plores the historical development of literature aimed at adolescents or popular 
with them. Studies representative works in a variety of genres to determine thematic and 

stylistic characteristics and literary merit. 

Prerequisite: Junior standing. Not applicable toward an Arts and Scien fUsh. 

20.360 EARLY ENGLISH DRAMA + 3 sem. hrv 

Early native drama, including miracle and mystery plays, morality plays, and in- 
terludes. Elizabethan dramatists: Hey wood. Marlowe. Kyd. Jonson. Webster. Middle* 
and Ford. 

20.361 RESTORATION AND LATER DRAMA + 3 s im . hrv 
Wycherley, Etherege, Congreve, Farquhar, Dry den and Otway. with consideration of 

Moliere's influence in Restoration drama. Eighteenth century sentimental comedy and 
tragedy, and reaction against it in Goldsmith and Sheridan. Trends in 19th century drama. 

20.362 MODERN DRAMA + 3 sem. hrv 

Major Continental, English, and American plays from Ibsen to Beckett, with em- 
phasis on contemporary attitudes, themes, and structure as contrasted with those of tradi- 
tional dramatists. 

20.363 SHAKESPEARE + 3 sem. hrv 

Study of Shakespeare's plays with emphasis on Shakespeare as poet and playwright 
and with attention to conditions of the Elizabethan theatre and the history o\ the Shake- 
spearean text. 

20.370 THE ENGLISH NOVEL + 3 Mm hrs. 

History and development of the novel in England from its inception to the end o\ the 

Nineteenth Century. 

20.372 MODERN NOVEL 3 sem. hrv 
A study oi major modern novelists, exclusive of American and Russian writers lm- 

phasi/es developments in fictional art. particularly realism, naturalism, impressionism, and 
expressionism Begins m the turn-ot-thc-century novd of Conrad and mo\es through the 
Writing! ol Mann. Proust. Lawrence, Kafka, WoobT, Joyce, and or one or two others of the 
instructor's choice 

20.373 AMERH AN M)\ | I 3 sem hrs 
Studies the development Ol the DOVd in America From Us beginnings about 1800 to 

the present I mphasi/cs highlights oi form, theme, and reflections Ol American literary and 
social movements Some attention to parallel de\elopments in the European rnuel 

20.374 5HOR1 SIOKN 3 sem. hrs. 
\ Mud) ot the history, Characteristics, and techniques of the modern short stor> 

through leading and anaKsis of representative samples American. British. Continental. 

au>.\ I at in- American 

20.380 MODERN POETRY 1 3 sem. hrs. 

An introduction to contemporar\ poetic mo\cments through study o\ Fmily 
Dickinson. 1 S Eliot, I I CummingS, Robert I owell. Allen Ginsberg. Thomas Hardy. 

Gerard Mankj Hopkins. \\ B Yeats, v\ H \uden, Dylan (nomas, and other poets 



I NGI imi Coi KM s 95 

20.381 CHAUCER + 3 koi, hrs. 

Study of Chaucer's major poetry, with practice in speaking and leading Middle 
English and with major emphasis on Chaucer's literary achievement and his humanism. 

20.383 BLAKE AND YEATS + 3 KB. hrs. 

A study of two great poets united by their search lor a vision and by having created 
in this search perhaps the most original and complete mythological system in English litera- 
ture. 

20.400 LITERARY STUDY ABROAD 3 sem. hrs. 

A travel-study course for English majors and non-majors to concentrate on a writer 
or literary problem in the perspective of their disciplines. Includes meetings with writers and 
scholars and use of native sources and resources. Area of emphasis is determined by the 
instructor. 

20.411 MODERN LINGUISTIC THEORY 3 sem. hrs. 

Explores the most recent theories of grammatical analysis with particular attention to 
transformational grammar. 
Prerequisite: Junior standing. 

20.413 LANGUAGE IN AMERICAN STUDY 3 sem. hrs. 

Social, political, and philosophical perspectives on the historical development and 
current status of English and other languages in American society. 

20.440 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN ENGLISH 3 or 6 sem. hrs. 

[see section 7.5] 

20.482 MILTON 3 sem. hrs. 

A comprehensive study of the poetry and prose of John Milton. 

20.488, 489, 490 SEMINAR 3 sem. hrs. 

Independent study with opportunity to explore a literary subject not offered in 
regularly scheduled courses. Content, determined by instructor, varies each time the course 
is offered. 
Prerequisite: Junior standing and approval of instructor. Open to non-majors. 

20.491 HONORS SEMINAR 3 sem. hrs. 

Independent study in depth of a literary topic, approved in prior consultation with 
the instructor, deriving from the student's work in other English courses. Limited to ten 
outstanding majors or non-majors. 
Prerequisite: Junior standing and approval of instructor. 

20.492 LITERARY CRITICISM 3 sem. hrs. 

Examination in depth of major critics from Aristotle to the present; emphasis on ap- 
plication of critical principles to primary genres — drama, poetry, novel. 
Prerequisite: Junior standing. 

20.493 BIBLIOGRAPHY AND LITERARY RESEARCH 3 sem. hrs. 

History of literary scholarship, study of book production, and practice in preparing 
specialized bibliographies and in planning scholarly projects. 
Prerequisite: Junior standing. 

20.494 RHETORIC OF LITERATURE 

Studies systematically the major rhetorical devices used by writers in the various 
literary genres. It is intended to examine the nature of rhetoric and to explore the range of 
rhetorical designs from the shortest communications to the whole composition. Study 



.1 ISH 

centers on defuiitioni <>t concepts, identification and location of these language devicei m 

representative works ol drama, prose and poetry, description of (unctions and ftl 
communication effect! on the readme audience f ssentialK. the course studies how w- 
manipulate language to communicate in literature. 

211.4^7 INTERNSHIP Vh srm. hrs. 

\ work-Stud) program open on!) to lunior and senior \ n^lish majors \oi applica- 
ble toward requirement* <>( English ma/or and minor programs. 




Foreign I wot am s 97 
FOREIGN LANGUAGES 



FACTl l\ 



Professors C. Whitncj Carpenter II, Ariadna Foureman, Allen F. Murphy (Chairperson), 
Eric W Smithner, Alfred E. Ionolo; Associate Professors Blaise ( Delnis, Mar\ Lou 
John, George W. Neel, Christine T. Whitmer; Assistant Professor Ben C. Alter. 

Placement 

Students who have studied a language elsewhere than at Bloomsburg State 
College should consult the department Chairperson for appropriate placement. 

language Laboratory 

Weekly laboratory sessions are required in all elementary and intermediate 
courses. Students are encouraged to make additional use of the language labora- 
tory facilities on a voluntary basis. 

Programs Abroad 

Each summer, the Department offers study programs abroad. Language 
majors are encouraged to participate in one of these programs before graduating. 

Arts and Sciences Majors 

Majors are offered in French, German and Spanish. A major for the B.A. 
degree requires a minimum of 30 semester hours in the language in courses be- 
yond 101, 102; if a student is exempt from any required courses, he or she takes 
additional advanced electives as substitutes. 

It is recommended that students who take a major in one of the languages 
also elect courses in related fields such as a second foreign language, English, fine 
arts, history, philosophy, sociology, speech, theatre. 

Secondary Education Majors 

Requirements for the major for the B.S. in Education degree are found in 
the section on Secondary Education. School of Professional Studies (Section 9.2). 

Elementary Education Minors 

It is recommended that a student in Elementary Education who elects an 
area of concentration in foreign languages schedule one course in Conversation, 
one in Civilization, and the Folklore course. Beginning courses (100, 101, and 
102) may also be included within the required eighteen hours. 

FRENCH 

Arts and Sciences major for the B.A. degree: 

French: 10.103, 104, 201, 202, 21 1 or 212, 322; 

Electives: twelve semester hours to be selected from culture and civilization, lan- 
guage, or literature. 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

(Code 10) 

Courses designed t may be used toward General Education. 

10.100 BEGINNING FRENCH I f 4 sem. hrs. 

Audio-lingual and visual approach primarily to develop oral expression. Inductive 
grammar. Weekly laboratory sessions required. Recommended for students with no pre- 



s« H 

vious background or not more than one vear o! study in French; followed bv a specia 
lion o! 10.102 in the Spring fall only. 

10.101 ELEMENTARY FRENCH 1 4 an*, torn. 

Designed to develop the tour language skilU . iy labora- 

tor\ sessions required Recommended tor students with no more than tH I previous 
study in rrench. 

10.102 ELEMENTARY FRENCH n 1 4 sem. hrv 

Dtinuation ot 10.101. Reading and writing given additional emphasis. Weekly 
laboratory KnioiU required. 
Prerequisite: 10.101 or equivalent. 

10.103 INTERMEDIATE FRENCH I + m. hrs. 
Bask grammar reviewed and new grammatical concepts presented. Weekly labora- 

torv sessions required. 
Prerequisite: 10.102 or equivalent. 

10.104 INTERMEDIATE FRENCH II + n hrs. 

Continuation of French 10.103. 
Prerequisite: 10.103 or equivalent. 

10.105 READING PROFICIENCY IN FRENCH + \ sem. hrs. 

Designed tor non-majors with little or no background in French. Emphasis placed on 
translation from French to English. Specialized readings in the student's major studied on 
individualized basis. Recommended for advanced degree candidates Not applicable toward 
a major in French. 
Recommend prerequisite: 10. 101. 

10.201 GRAMMAR AND COMPOSITION I MB. hrv 

In-depth study oi French grammar. Stress on application o\ grammatical principles 
in controlled and tree written compositions. Fall. 
Prerequisite: 10. 104 or equivalent. 

10.202 CONN KRSATION \ <"■ hrs. 

Student participation emphasized in prepared and tree speaking activities Oul 
readings and oral reports assigned. Grammar reviewed when net 
Prerequisite: 10.104 or equivalent, or concurrently with 104 with per-' 
person. 

10.204 FRENCH STUDIES ABROAD 1 \A mm hrs. 
Prerequisite: Minimum 2 semesters of French, 

10.205 COMMERCIAL FRENCH 1 I tea. hi*. 

tcquistiofl Ol French commercial language and terminologv. in writir . king 

with briel background ot business lite in r ranee lodav 

Prerequisite: 10.104 or equivalent. 

10 209 PHONETICS 3 «m. hrs. 

Structure] analvsis ot the French sound swem Drills on accurate pronunciation and 
intonation Selections ot prose and poetrv presented for imitation S: 
quisite 10,102 or equivalent. 

1 o.2i I FRENCH CULTURE AND CIVILIZATION 1 1 3 sem. hrs. 

Majoi developments ot French culture from the historical viewpoint Course taught 
in 1 nghsh No knowledge ot French necessarv Fall. 



FRI NCH 99 

10.212 FRENCH CULTURE AND CIVILIZATION II f 3 Mm. hrs. 

Major aspects of life in France today. Course taught in English. No knowledge ol 
French necessary. Spring. 

10.231 SELECTED READINGS t 3 sem. hrs. 

French for reading knowledge; selected modern works. Recommended for the 
student in elementary education. 
Prerequisite: 10.104 or equivalent. 

10.250 FRENCH HISTORY AND CULTURE TO 1789 

(IN ENGLISH) t 3 sem. hrs. 

General survey of the evolution of French life and culture from Gallo-Roman begin- 
nings to the beginning of the French Revolution. 

10.251 FRENCH HISTORY AND CULTURE SINCE 1789 

(IN ENGLISH) t 3 sem. hrs. 

Study of the transformation of France into a modern nation in the Revolutionary 
and Napoleonic eras. General survey of the impact of nationalism, industrialism, and shift 
in world balance of forces in terms of French culture and politics. 

10.301 STRUCTURE AND TRANSLATION 3 sem. hrs. 

Study of structural patterns of French in comparison with English. Problems of 
translation. Recommended for students planning a career in international affairs. 
Prerequisite: 10.201. 

10.302 ADVANCED CONVERSATION 3 sem. hrs. 

Further development of language fluency through discussion of a variety of topics 
and through various activities requiring the use of the spoken language. 
Prerequisite: 10.202. Fall. 

10.310 FOLKLORE 3 sem. hrs. 

Study of selected forms and writings such as proverbs, farces, fairy tales, songs, and 
traditions characteristic of the French. Recommended for students in Elementary Educa- 
tion. 
Prerequisite: 10.201 or 202. 

10.322 SURVEY OF FRENCH LITERATURE 3 sem. hrs. 

Literature of France since its earliest beginnings to the Revolution. Spring. 
Prerequisite: 10.201 or 202. 

10.330 SHORT STORY OR SHORT NOVEL 3 sem. hrs. 

Selected works of modern French prose writers. 
Prerequisite: 10.201 or 202. 

10.331 DRAMA 3 sem. hrs. 

Selected works and discussions on major contemporary French playwrights. 
Prerequisite: 10.201 or 202. 

10.341 FRENCH LITERATURE IN ENGLISH TRANSLATION I 3 sem. hrs. 

Reading, analysis and discussion of major French works in translation, beginning 
with the Song of Roland and continuing with authors such as Rabelais, Pascal, Moliere, 
Voltaire, Rousseau, Diderot and others. Does not count toward a major in French. 

10.342 FRENCH LITERATURE IN ENGLISH TRANSLATION II 3 sem. hrs. 

Readings in the novel and the theatre of 19th and 20th century with authors such as 
Balzac, Stendhal, Flaubert, Gide, Proust, Camus, Genet, Ionesco, and others. Does not 
count toward a major in French. 



KM) (M KM\s 

11)401 tDVANCED FRENCH LANGUAG1 \ sem. hrs. 

rhorougfa revien ol phonology, morphology, syntax and semantics 

10.410 FRENCH AREA STUDIES 3 sem. hrs 

Significant contemporary problemi of France. Its position m the uorld toda> and us 

relation to the I'nitcd States Reading ot current French periodicals and mag.: _.>m- 

mended lor students planning to stud\ abroad, Ma\ he taught in English. 
Prerequisite: 10.211 or 212. 

10.435 M\ii\ \k IN MODERN FREN< H LITERATI RF I 3 sem. hrs. 
Study ot a particular genre, movement, period, uork. or major author from the 

Resolution to contemporary times. The topic ot the seminar is decided by the instructor 
considering the needs ot prospective students during the semester preceding its ottering. 
Prerequisite: an) 300 level course. 

10.436 SKMINAR IN MODERN FRENCH LITERATURE II 3 sem. hrs 
Continuation of 10.435. 

Prerequisite: any 300 level course. 

10.490 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN FRENCH 1-9 sem. hrs 

Individual study of a particular aspect of French civilization, language, or literature 
under the supervision of a faculty memher. 
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and approval from Chairman. 

[see section 7.5] 

10.495 ART AND CULTURE OF FRANCE 3 sem hrs 

A study-tour of France with specific attention to French art seen in relation I 

social and cultural environment. Visits to places of artistic and cultural interest in and 
around Paris and the Provinces. 

GERMAN 

Arts and Sciences major for the B.A. degree: 
German: 11.103, 104, 201, 202, 211; 

I lectues: fifteen semester hours to he selected from culture and civilization, lan- 
guage, or literature. 

COl RSI DESCRIPTIONS 

(Code II) 

Courses designed + may he used toward General Education. 

(Note Where course numbers have been changed, the former numbers appear in 
parentheses | 

n.ioo BEGINNING GERMAN 4 ism hrs. 

Direct method approach to develop the foul language skills stressed \\eekl\ lab 
lor) sessions required. Recommended tor students with no previoUl background or not 
molt than one \car ot studs in German. Followed b) B special section of 11.102 in the 

Spring f all only. 

ii.ioi ELEMENTARY GERMAN 1 1 4 sem. hrs. 

Designed to develop the tour language skills Basic grammar stressed Recommended 
lor students uith no mote than IWO \ears ot previous studs in the language 

1 1102 ELEMENTARY GERMAN II t 4 sem. hrs. 

Continuation ot 11.101. Reading and * tiling given additional emphasis 
Prerequisite: 11.101 or equivalent. 



German ioi 

11.103 INTERMEDIATE GERMAN I f 3 sem. hrs. 
Basic grammar reviewed and new grammatical concepts presented 

Prerequisite: 11.102 or equivalent . 

11.104 INTERMEDIATE GERMAN II t 3 sem. hrs. 
Continuation of 1 1 . 103. 

Prerequisite: 11.103 or equivalent. 

11.201 GRAMMAR AND COMPOSITION t 3 sem. hrs. 

In-depth study of German grammar. Stress on application of grammatical principles 
in controlled and free written composition. Fall. 
Prerequisite: 11.104 or equivalent. 

11.202 CONVERSATION t 3 sem. hrs. 

Student participation emphasized in prepared and free speaking activities. Outside 
readings and oral reports assigned. Grammar reviewed when necessary. Spring. 
Prerequisite: 11.104 or equivalent, or concurrently with 104 with permission from Chair- 
person. 

11.204 GERMAN STUDIES ABROAD t 1-6 sem. hrs. 

Prerequisite: Minimum 2 semesters of German. 

11.211 GERMAN CULTURE AND CIVILIZATION I | 3 sem. hrs. 

Understanding of the geography, government, customs, education, arts, and history 
of the German-speaking countries, as well as a vivid sense of the current scenes in these 
countries. Course taught in English. No knowledge of German necessary. Fall. 

11.212 GERMAN CULTURE AND CIVILIZATION II | 3 sem. hrs. 

Continuation of 11.211. Course taught in English. No knowledge of German 
necessary. Spring. 

11.231 SELECTED READINGS | 3 sem. hrs. 

German for reading knowledge; selected modern works. Recommended for the 
student in Elementary Education. 
Prerequisite: 11.104 or equivalent. 

11.301 TEXTE ZUM NACHERZAEHLEN 3 sem. hrs. 

Short prose selections read and repeated from memory, building vocabulary growth 
and better expression. Exercises in translation to illustrate differences in thought and 
expression between German and English. Fall. 
Prerequisite: 11.201 or equivalent. 

11.310 FOLK LITERATURE 3 sem. hrs. 

Study of folk genres on both social and literary aspects of German folklore. Recom- 
mended for students in Elementary Education. 
Prerequisite: 11.201 or 202. 

11.325 MASTERPIECES OF GERMAN LITERATURE | 3 sem. hrs. 

Readings and discussions of representative works from the early period of German 
literature to the present. 
Prerequisite: 11.201 or 202. 

11.326 GOETHE AND SCHILLER 3 sem. hrs. 

The life and works of these best-known German authors and relevancy of their art 
and ideas to our times. 
Prerequisite: 11.325. 



102 Spanish 

11.331 CONTEMPORARY PLAYS 3 sem. hrv 

Selected playi ot the major modern German playwrights: Brecht. Fnsch, Dur- 
renmatt. Weis. and others 

Prerequisite: 11.201 or 202. 

11.333 GERMAN PROSI m. hrv 

I he Sovclle and l.rzahlun%en ot the 19th and 20th centuries. 
ndsite: 11.201 or 202. 

11.341 GERMAN AUTHORS Of IMK TWENTIETH CENTUR1 I 3 sem. hrv 

Works of major (ierman authors such as Hesse. Brecht. Mann, Kafka. Durrenmatt. 
Boll read and discussed. Taught in English. No knowledge of German necessary. Does 
count toward a major in German. 

11.342 GERMAN AITHORS OF THE TWENTIETH CENTUR1 II 3 Mam, hrs 

Continuation of 11.341. Taught in English. No knowledge of German I 
Does not count toward a major in German. 

11.401 ADVANCED GERMAN LANGUAGE 3 sem. hrs 

Thorough review of phonology, morphology, syntax, and semantics. 
Prerequisite: 11.201 or 

11.403 WORKSHOP 3 sem. hrs. 

Selected materials for practical use. Recommended for Secondary Education majors. 
Prerequisite: 1 1.201 or 202. 

11.410 GERMAN AREA STUDIES 3 sem hrs 

Significant contemporary problems of German-speaking countries. Their position in 
the world today and relation to the I'nited States. Reading of current German periodicals 
and magazines. Recommended for students planning to study abroad. 
Prerequisite: 1 1.21 1 or 2/2. 

11.420 MODERN GERMAN LITERATI RK 3 sem hrs. 

Reading and discussion of (ierman Literature of the 1 9th and 20th Centuries up to 
World War II. 
Prerequisite: II 

1 1.421 CONTEMPORARY GERMAN LITERATURE 3 sem. hrs. 

Reading and discussion of (ierman 1 iterature since World War II. 
frcrcquisitc: II 

n.490 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN GERMAN 14 tern. In. 

Individual studs ol a particular aspect ot (ierman civilization, language, or literature 
under the supervision o! a tacult) member. 
Prerequisite Permission of instructor and approval from Chairman 

[see sect 10 n 7 5] 

SPANISH 

\rts and Sciences major for the B. A. degree: 

Spanish 12.103, km. 201, 202, 210 01 21 1. : ; 

I lectiscs twelve semester hours to he selected from culture and civilization, language 
or literature 

C Ol RSI DESi RIPTtONS 

(Code 12) 

Courses designed * ma\ be used toward General Ed u ca t ion. 



Spanish mm 

12.100 BEGINNING SPANISH + 3 sen. hrs. 
Designed to develop the four language skills. Basic grammar stressed. Weekly labora- 
tory sessions required. Open only to students with no prior experience in Spanish. Followed 
h\ a special section of 12.102 in the Spring, hall only. 

12.101 ELEMENTARY SPANISH I + 3 sem. hrs. 

Designed to develop the tour language skills. Basic grammar stressed. Weekly labora- 
tory sessions required. 

12.102 ELEMENTARY SPANISH II + 3 sem. hrs. 

Continuation of 12.101. Reading and writing given additional emphasis. Weekly 
laboratory sessions required. 
Prerequisite: 12.101 or equivalent. 

12.103 INTERMEDIATE SPANISH I t 3 sem. hrs. 

Emphasis placed on use of language. Grammar reviewed as necessary. 
Prerequisite: 12.102 or equivalent. 

12.104 INTERMEDIATE SPANISH II | 3 sem. hrs. 

Continuation of 12.103. 
Prerequisite: 12.103 or equivalent. 

12.105 READING PROFICIENCY IN SPANISH t 3 sem. hrs. 

Designed for non-majors with little or no background in Spanish. Emphasis placed 
on translation from Spanish to English. Specialized readings in student's major studied on 
individualized basis. Recommended for advanced degree candidates. Not applicable toward 
a major in Spanish. 
Recommended prerequisite: 12. 101. 

12.201 GRAMMAR AND COMPOSITION f 3 sem. hrs. 

In-depth study of Spanish grammar. Stress on application of grammatical principles 
in controlled and free written compositions. Fall. 

12.202 CONVERSATION t 3 sem. hrs. 

Student participation emphasized in prepared and free speaking activities. Outside 
readings and oral reports assigned. Grammar reviewed when necessary. Spring. 
Prerequisite: 12.104 or equivalent, or concurrently with 104 with permission from Chair- 
person. 

12.203 COMMERCIAL SPANISH t 3 sem. hrs. 

For students enrolled in business administration. Course designed to acquaint 
students with basic skills in Spanish trade correspondence and commercial reading. Special 
emphasis placed on writing business letters, vocabulary, and commercial idioms. Elementary 
knowledge of commercial life and methods stressed. 
Prerequisite: 12.102 or two years of high school Spanish or equivalent. 

12.204 SPANISH STUDIES ABROAD t 1-6 sem. hrs. 

Prerequisite: Minimum 2 semesters of Spanish. 

12.206 BASIC CONVERSATION IN SPANISH 

FOR HEALTH PROFESSIONALS 3 sem. hrs. 

For students enrolled in Health Services. Designed to acquaint students with Spanish 
so that they will be able to communicate with Spanish-speaking patients. 

12.210 SPANISH CULTURE AND CIVILIZATION + 3 sem. hrs. 

An understanding of Spain through geography, education, customs, fine arts, and 
history. Fall. 
Prerequisite: 12.104 or equivalent. 



iiu Spanish 

12.211 SPANISH AMERICAN CULTURI \M) ( IMI 1/ \IIon J sem. hrs. 

understanding and appreciation of the present and past lite of the Spanish- 
American Republics Spring. 

Prereq u isite. 12.104 or equivalent. 

i: 2<o INTROD1 ( nON rOTHESTUDI 01 UTERATURI m. hrs. 

M.imc anaKsis ot selected poems, pla\s. no\els. and esi .pis ot genres. 

hterar> currents .ind schools Pall. 

Prerequisite: 12.103 or equivalent. 

12.231 SELECTED READINGS 3 %em. hrv 

Readme and discussion ot selected modern works. 
Prerequisite: 12.104 or equivalent. 

12.301 STRUCTURE AND TR \ YM \ HON J >em. hrv 
Study ot structural patterns of Spanish in comparison with English. Problems of 

translation. Recommended for students planning a career in international aflail 
Prerequisite: 12.201. 

12.302 AD\ W ED CONVERSATION 3 s«m. hrs. 

Further development of language fluency through discussion of a variety of topics 
and through activities requiring the use of the spoken language. Student participation em- 
phasized. Fall. 
Prerequisite: 12.202. 

12.310 FOLKLORE 3 sem. hrs. 

Study of folk genres based on both social and literary asp. Spanish folklore. 

Recommended tor students in Elementary Education. 
Prerequisite: 12.201 or 202. 

12.321 SURVEY OF SPANISH LITERATURE 3 sem. hrs. 

Outstanding authors from the beginning oi Spanish I iterature to the present day. 
Prerequisite 12.230. 

12.323 SI RVE1 OF SPANISH \MFRK AN LITERATURE 3 sem. hrs 

Outstanding authors from pre-Columbian times to present da\ 
Prerequisite: 1 2.230. 

12.330 SHORT STORY + 3 sem hrs 

Intended to promote literan appreciation o\ the short stor\ in Spanish Selected 
works read and discussed 
Prerequisite 12 . 

12.341 SPANISH LITERATURE IN ENGLISH TRANSLATION luakn. 

Reading, analysis, mk\ discussion ot works of Spanish literature and contemp, 
thought laught in English. No knowledge of Spanish Decen :rj a 

ma/or m Spanish. 

12.342 I MIN \MFRK \N UTERATUR1 IN rM.I IM1 1R \NM \ I ION 3 sem hrs. 
Reading, analysis, and discussion Of works of I atin American literature and coniem- 

porBT) thought laught in English. No knowledge of Spanish ^ jpplnable 

towa r d a rna/or m Spanish. 

12.421 SEMINAR IN SPANISH EJTERATURI 3-6 sem. hrs. 

Studs of I particulai genre, mmement. period, work, or maior author The topic of 
the seminar ma\ be decided between the instructor and the prospective students during the 
semester preceding the ottering o\ a seminar \1a\ be repeated once 
Prerequisite 12 .321. 



Ki ssi \s. li \i i \\ I OS 

12.423 SEMINAR IN SPANISH AMERICAN III ERA 1 1 RE 3-6 sim. hrs. 

Study of a particular genre, movement, period, work, or major author. I he topic ol 
the seminar ma) he decided between the instructor and the prospective students during the 
lemestei preceding the offering o! a seminar. May be repeated once. 
Prerequisite: 12.323. 

12.490 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN SPANISH 1-9 sem. hrs. 

Individual study of a particular aspect of Hispanic civilization, language, or literature 
under the supervision of a faculty member. 
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor anil approval of Chairman. 

[see section 7.5] 

RUSSIAN 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

(Code 13) 

+ General Education courses. 

13.101 ELEMENTARY RUSSIAN I t 4 sem. hrs. 

Audio-lingual and structural approach to acceptable pronunciation; vocabulary; con- 
comitant mastery of the Cyrillic alphabet. Fall. 

13.102 ELEMENTARY RUSSIAN II t 4 sem. hrs. 

Continuation of the development of the basic skills of understanding, speaking, read- 
ing, and writing. Spring. 
Prerequisite: 13.101 or equivalent. 

13.103 INTERMEDIATE RUSSIAN I f 3 sem. hrs. 

Maximum class use of the spoken language. Review of grammar and syntax based 
on excerpts from noted Russian authors. Fall. 
Prerequisite: 13.102. 

13.104 INTERMEDIATE RUSSIAN II t 3 sem. hrs. 

Continuation and reinforcement of skills acquired in 13.103. Spring. 
Prerequisite: 13.103 or equivalent. 

13.290 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN RUSSIAN t 1-9 sem. hrs. 

Individual study of a particular aspect of Russian civilization, language, or literature 
under the supervision of a faculty member. 
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and approval of Chairman. 

[see section 7.5] 

ITALIAN 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

(Code 14) 

+ General Education courses. 

14.101 ELEMENTARY ITALIAN I f 4 sem. hrs. 

Designed to develop the four language skills. Basic grammar stressed. Weekly labora- 
tory sessions required. Fall. 

14.102 ELEMENTARY ITALIAN II t 4 sem. hrs. 

Continuation of 14.101. Reading and writing given additional emphasis. Weekly 
laboratory sessions required. Spring. 
Prerequisite: 14.101 or equivalent. 



10* I'm ISH, I viin 

14.103 imi RMEDI iTE ITALIAN I m. hn. 

grammar rcvi c nttd and new, grammatical concepts presented Weekly labora- 

ssiuns required, lull. 

Prerequisite: 14.102 ot equivalent. 



14.104 INTERMEDI Ml II \i I\n II 

Continuation ot 14.103. Spring 
Prerequisite: 14.103 or equivalent. 



3 sem. hrs. 



POLISH 

COt RSE DESi RIP I low 

(Code 15) 

15.101 ELEMENTARY POLISH I + 4 sem. hrs 

Designed to develop the four language skills. Basic grammar itiesi ■ y labora- 

tory sessions required. Fall. 

15.102 ELEMENTARY POLISH II + 4 sem hrs 

Continuation of 15.101. Reading and writing given additional emphasis Weekly 
laboratory sessions required. Spring. 
Prerequisite: 15.101 or equivalent. 

LATIN 

COURSE DESCRIPTK) \ 5 
(Code 18) 

18.101 ELEMENTARY LATIN I + 3 sem hrs 

Designed to develop reading and writing primarily although some emplu- 
on correct Classical pronunciation. Fall. 

18.102 ELEMENTARY LATIN II + 3 sem hrs 

Continuation of 18.101. Reading selections used to develop skill in reading and 
translation and to acquaint students with Classical references. Spring. 
Prerequisite: 18.101 or equivalent. 




Geography wd Earth Sciences 107 
GEOGRAPHY AND EARTH SCIENCES 



FACULTY: 

Professors Wendelin R Frantz (Chairperson), Bruce F Adams, John A. Enman, Lee C. 
Hopple; Associate Professors Norman M. Gillmeister, Brian A. Johnson, .James R. Lauffer, 
James I. Lorelli, Lavere W. McClure, Mark A. Hornberger; Assistant Professors Duane I) 

Braun, Joseph R. Pifer, John J. Serff, Jr., George E. Stetson. 

GEOGRAPHY 

Arts and Science Major for the B.A. degree: 

Option I. (General): 41.101, 102; 24 semester hours in courses with code numbers 41 
and 51 with at least one course from each of four areas: Systematic Physical 
41.253, 256, 51.101, 255, 259; Human Geography — 41.213, 221, 258, 310, 324, 
370, 463; Regional — 41.321, 333, 343, 344, 345, 346, 347; Techniques — 41.254, 
462. 

Option II. (Emphasis or Urban and Regional Planning): 24 semester hours required 
in Planning including 41.150, 41.254, 41.350, 41.497, and 41.498. 

15 semester hours from 41.221, 258, 310, 370, 454, 462, 463, 51.101, 105; 

3 semester hours from 40.211, 212, 316, 410; 

3 semester hours from 44.351, 356, 437, 453; 

3 semester hours from 45.21 1, 233, 316, 468, 477; 

3 semester hours from 32.250, 48.260, 53.171, 53.141. 

EARTH SCIENCE: 

Arts and Sciences major for the B.A. degree: 

Earth Science 51.101, 102, 253, 255, 259; plus 3 additional courses elected from 
51.105, 361, 362, 365, 396, 370, 461, 468, 475, and approved courses offered by the 
Marine Science Consortium; Mathematics 53.112; 53.113 or 53.123; Chemistry 
52.102, 113; Physics 54.11 1, 112. 

A maximum of 9 semester hours from the Marine Science Consortium may be ap- 
plied. 

See Marine Science (55) for additional electives in Earth Science. 

GEOLOGY: 

Arts and Science Major for the B.S. degree 

Earth Science 51.101, 102, 361, 362, 365, 369, 370, 468, 493; Mathematics 53.171, 
141, 123 or 53.125, 126, 171; Chemistry 52.102, 1 13; Physics 54.11 1, 1 12 or 54.21 1, 
212. 

GEOGRAPHY 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

(Code 41) 

Courses marked t may be applied toward General Education requirements. Any 
other courses may also be applied provided one of these has been taken. 

41.101 WORLD PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY t 3 sem. hrs. 

Earth-sun relationships, land masses, oceans, landforms, weather and climate, and 
natural resources as elements and controls related to the adjustments man makes to his en- 
vironment. 

41.102 WORLD CULTURAL GEOGRAPHY t 3 sem. hrs. 

Designed to show the relationship of man, land, culture and economics activities. 



41.125 WEATHER AND CUMAT1 3sem.hr>. 

A stud> <>t the interrelationships between the elements ol weather and climate; the 
functional application of these elements is elahorated upon through I stud> of climatic 
realms Students having taken 51.255 ma> not enroll in or receive credit lor 41 

41.150 ELEMENTS OF PLANNING 3 sem. hrs. 

Designed to acquaint students with the philosoph\ of planning, the roles of the plan- 
ner, and planning prohlems. 

41.213 POLITICAL GEOGRAPHY t Jstmkn. 

An anaKsis of physical, human, and economic factors which influence the changing 
pattern of the political map of the world. 

41.221 ECONOMIC GEOGRAPHY + 3 sem hrs. 

Major economic activities; locus on significant characteristics, location theor\ and 
spatial patterns. 

41.253 PHYSIOGRAPHY + 3 sem hrs 

The study of the dynamic, tectonic, and gradational forces, which, in conjunction 
with climatic and biologic forces, have shaped the earth into its present form and 
continuously refashion and modify it. Students having taken 51.365 may not enroll in or 
receive credit for 41.253. 

41.254 ELEMENTS OF CARTOGRAPHY 3 sem hrs 

Use, construction, and interpretation of maps, models, globes, charts, and geographic 
diagrams. 

41.256 CLIMATOLOGY 3 sem hrs 

An analysis of climate (temperature, moisture, pressure, wind, air masses and storms) 
and the world-wide distribution of climates. 

41.258 CONSERVATION OF NATURAL RESOURCES + 3 sem hrs 

Identifies resource management and environmental problems and offers possible al- 
ternative solutions tor these problems. 

41.310 POPULATION GEOGRAPHY + 3 sem hrs 

A quantitative analysis of demographic data and qualitative examination of popula- 
tion characteristics. 

41.321 GEOGRAPHY OF I Mir I) SI \IKS \\l) ( V\ U)A + 3 sem hrs. 

A spatial anaKsis o\ the United States and Canada emphasizing such concepts as en- 
vironmental perception and sequent occupance. salient problems within geographic regions 
ait considered in terms of genesis and potential for solution. 

41.324 GEOGRAPHIC INFLUENCES W AMERICAN HISTORY 1 3 sem. hrs. 

Relationship between the historical movements and the natural environments m the 

I nited states 
Prerequisite 42.121. 

41.333 GEOGRAPHY OF EUROPE t 3 sem. hrs. 

Europe*! physical characteristics, topography, transportation systems, resources, 
population, and trade 

41.343 GEOGRAPHY OF MONSOON ASIA t 3 sem. hrs. 

Physical and Cultural Characteristics of South and lav: tail (Pakistan through 

Japan) 



di c)(,i< \pin 109 



41.344 GEOGRAPHY OF LATIN AMERICA + 3 stm. hrs. 
Latin America as a major geographic region is examined m terms ot those economic, 

racial, and cultural forms that have provided regional unity and diversity. 

41.345 GEOGRAPHY OF AFRICA t 3 sem. hrs 

Physical geographic elements as they relate to agriculture, grazing, mining, manu- 
facturing, transportation, communication, and political boundaries of the continent. 

41.346 GEOGRAPHY OF THE SOVIET REALM t 3 sem. hrs. 

Physical and human geography of the Soviet Union with some emphasis upon the 
relationship between that country and the so-called "Satellite" nations. 

41.347 GEOGRAPHY OF THE MIDDLE EAST f 3 sem. hrs. 

Cultural and physical geography of the area including Turkey, through Afghanistan. 

41.350 ADVANCED PLANNING 3 sem. hrs. 

The development of the skills and techniques used in analyses, goal setting, plan 
preparation, and implementation of urban and regional planning processes and activities. 

41.370 RURAL SETTLEMENT AND LAND USE 3 sem. hrs. 

Investigates the major pattern of rural settlement and land use and the processes in- 
volved in explaining the changing American rural landscape. 

41.404 THE GEOGRAPHY OF FOOD PRODUCTION 3 sem. hrs. 

An in-depth examination of the characteristics of the major agricultural regions of 
the world and an attempt to explain how they came into being. Included also will be a 
description of the features of contemporary farming systems. 

41.444 THE GEOGRAPHY OF INDUSTRIAL LOCATION 3 sem. hrs. 

A comprehensive examination of the factors which influence the location of indus- 
tries and the Industrial Location Theory will be made. Time will also be devoted to study- 
ing the manner by which selected industries have chosen their particular locations. 

41.454 CARTOGRAPHY FOR URBAN-REGIONAL PLANNING 3 sem. hrs. 

The use, construction, and interpretation of maps, charts, and diagrams for urban 
and regional land use planning. 

41.462 THEORETICAL AND QUANTITATIVE GEOGRAPHY 3 sem. hrs. 

Conceptual frameworks, theoretical developments, methods of measuring intensity 
and dispersion of geographical distributions, and quantitative approaches in geographical 
analyses. 2 hours class and 2 hours laboratory/ week. 

41.463 URBAN GEOGRAPHY t 3 sem. hrs. 

Designed to provide a conceptual and methodological framework in which to view 
the process of urbanization. 

41.475 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN GEOGRAPHY 1-3 sem. hrs. 

Independent, investigative research oriented to studies of specific geographical prob- 
lems. 
Prerequisite: for Junior and Senior Geography majors. 

[see section 7.5] 

41.497 INTERNSHIP IN URBAN/REGIONAL PLANNING 12 sem. hrs. 

It involves the placement of a student who is enrolled in the course of study in 
Urban/ Regional Planning into a planning office for one semester, during which time the 
student will be actively involved in the functions and activities of that planning office. 



I 10 1 \KIH S< II M I \M> dlul <H,\ 

41.491 IRBW REGIONA1 DESIGN 3sem.hr>. 

Io he taken in coordination with the internship in I'rhan Regional Planning. The 
course proudes an opportunit> lor reporting and analyzing experiences in internship I* 
integrates and utilizes practice in the development of land use plans tor urhan regional 
development. 



EARTH s( lr\( E WD GEOLOGY 

COl RSI DESCRIPTIONS 

(Code 51) 

51.100 FIELD APPLICATIONS OF EARTH SCIENCE 3sem.hr*. 

Open to Quest summer program students only. Is not applicable toward a degree in 
Earth Science, and will be given in the field as part of a Quest students' curriculum. 

51.101 PHYSICAL GEOLOGY + 4 sem. hrv 
A study of the landscape in relation to the structure of the earth's crust; ager 

work to change landforms; classification and interpretation of rocks 3 hours class and 2 
hours laboratory week. 

51.102 HISTORICAL GEOLOGY f 4 sem. hrv 

Earth history as interpreted from rock and fossil evidence, with emphasis on 
continuous evolution of the earth and life on it. 3 hours class and 2 hrv laboratory week. 

51.105 ENVIRONMENTAL GEOLOGY + 3 sem. hrv 

Application of geologic principles to the environment. Emphasis is on earth proa 
influencing man, engineering properties of rocks and soils, and the environmental implica- 
tion of earth resources. 

51.253 ASTRONOMY + 3 sem hrs. 

Physical characteristics and motions of the solar system; interesting phenomena of 
our galactic system and those of extragalactic space; study o\ constellations 

51.255 METEOROLOGY + 3 sem hrv 

A study of the atmosphere and of laws and underlying principles ot atmospheric 
changes. 2 hours class and 2 hours laboratory week. Students having taken 41.123 ma\ not 

enroll in or receive credit for 51.255. 

51.259 OCEANOGRAPHY + 3 sem. hrs. 

Introduction to the geologic, chemical, and physical aspects ot the ocean basins 
phasis is on ocean basin structure, topographic features, wave motion, current circulation. 
and methods o! investigation. One weekend field trip is encouraged. 

51.355 SYNOPTIC METEOROLOGY 3 seas. hrs. 

Observation and analysis ol data tor understanding and predicting the complex 
ol the atmosphere 
Prerequisite 51.253 or COttsettt of instructor. 

51.361 MINERALOG1 4 sem. hrv 

Origin, occurrence, and identifying characteristics ot common minerals. Both megas- 
COpic and micioscopic techniques art ItreSSCd 3 hours class and 2 hours laboratory week. 

51.343 PI I KOI Oi.\ 4 sem. hrs. 

Megascopic and pctrographic analysis *ind identification ot rocks with emphasis on 
field occurrences and association. 3 hours class and 2 hours laboralor\ Week. 
Prerequisite S 1.361. 



I \K I II Sell \< I WD (il 01 <>(,<, I I I 

51.365 GEOMORPHOLOGY 4 wn. Mrs. 

Geomorphic processes and land forms With particular emphasis on their relationship 

tn underlying rock tithologies and structures. 3 hours class and 2 hours laboratory/ week. 

Students having taken 41.253 may not enroll in or receive credit lor 51.365. 

51.369 STRUCTURAL GEOLOGY 4 sem. hrs. 

An analysis of rock deformation based upon the principle of rock mechanics and the 
utilization of data from held investigations. 3 hours class and 2 hours laboratory week. 

51.370 HYDROLOCwY 3 sem. hrs. 

A course designed to introduce students to the principles and techniques of 
hydrology. The course will stress the practical aspects of hydrology and include appreciable 
amounts of time in the field. 

51.451 FIELD TECHNIQUES IN EARTH SCIENCE 6 sem. hrs. 

Intensive field and laboratory training in the use of equipment and techniques in the 
areas of geology, hydrology, and cartography. Field trips are integral and vital segments of 
the course. 
Prerequisite: 15 hours in Earth Science courses or consent of instructor. 

51.453 PROGRAMMING AND OPERATION OF THE 

PLANETARIUM 3 sem. hrs. 

An intensive study in the methods of effective educational use of the planetarium as 
a teaching and motivational device as well as supervised training and practice in the opera- 
tion, use, and maintenance of the planetarium equipment. 

51.461 MINERAL RESOURCES 3 sem. hrs. 

A study of both metallic and nonmetallic mineral deposits. Emphasis on the origin of 
deposits, exploration and exploitation methods used, and environmental problems en- 
countered. 
Prerequisite: Mineralogy, 51.361 or consent of instructor. 

51.468 STRATIGRAPHY AND SEDIMENTATION 4 sem. hrs. 

Processes and agents which erode, transport, and deposit sediments, and the geologic 
interpretation of the resulting rocks. 3 hours class and 2 hours laboratory/ week. 

51.475 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN EARTH SCIENCE 1-3 sem. hrs. 

Independent directed research oriented to studies of selected problems in earth 
science. 
Prerequisite: 21 semester hours in Earth Science. 

[see section 7.5] 

51.493 BIBLIOGRAPHY AND RESEARCH 3 sem. hrs. 

Library and/ or field research in geology. 
Prerequisites: 51.361, 362, 468 or consent of instructor. 

51.496 INTERNSHIP IN EARTH SCIENCE 3-15 sem. hrs. 

A work-study program available only to junior and senior Earth Science majors. Not 
applicable towards requirements of Earth Science major or minor programs. 



I 12 M VHIM S« ll s< l CONSORTII M 

MARINE SCIENCE CONSORTIUM 

I he courses in Marine Sciences are offered during summers in the Marine v 
Consortium conducted h> a number ol Pcnns\l\ania colleges I he ■■: acceptable 

for elective credit in majors in Bu.log\ and F arth Sciences Details ma\ he secured from 
(lure. Director of the Marine Science Consortium. 



( ol RSI s Ci RRENTl ) 4PPROI ED 
(Cod 

Note For course descriptions and credit see announcements of Marine Science Con- 
sortium; courses marked + ma\ he used for General Education. 



55.110 IMRODUCTION TO OCEANOGRAPHY + 

55.211 FIELD METHODS t 

55.212 NAVIGATION 

55.221 MARINE INVERTEBRATES + 
55.241 MARINE BIOLOGY + 

55.250 MANAGEMENT OF WETLAND WILDLIFE + 
55.260 MARINE ECOLOCO 
55.270 SCUBA DIVING 
55.280 FIELD BIOLOGY 
55.331 CHEMICAL OCEANOGRAPHY 
55 342 MARINE BOTANY 
ICHTHYOLOGY 

55.344 ANATOMY OF MARINE CHORDATES 

55.345 ORNITHOLOGY 
55.362 MARINE GEOLOGY 

>5}M PHYSICA1 OCEANOGRAPHY 

55.398 DEVELOPMENTAI BIOLOGY OF MARIN! ORGANISMS 
55 42o MARINE MICROPA1 I ONTOl OG^ 
■ I I CO! OGY OF MARIN1 PI WKK)\ 
H EXPLORATION Ml IHODs IN MARIN1 GEOLOG1 
55.459 COAS1 K\ GEOMORPHOI OG1 

rOPK S in M \kini sc [] nc i 
PROBI I MS in \1 \KINI SCI1 nc I 
555K) <>( I tNOGRAPHl ((In-Service retcben) 
55 5M o( i VNOGRAPm II (In-Service leachen) 
m MARINI MICROBIOI OG> 
OASTA1 SI DIM! ni mion 
I IWIRONMI NTAI S< II NCI I D\ CATION 
KIM \R( H CRUISE BIOl OGY, GEOLOGY. POLL! Hon 



Him hi \m> PHYSICAl EDI < \u<>\ I 13 

HEALTH, PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND ATHLETICS 

FACULTY: 

Professors Jerry Medlock (Chairperson), Stephen M. Bresett; Associate Professors .loan M. 
Auten, Rodrick Clark Boler, Charles Chronister, Russell E. Houk, Joanne E. McComh, Eli 
W. McLaughlin, Ronald E. Puhl, Burton T. Reese, Roger Sanders, Henry C. Turberville, 
Jr.; Assistant Professors Carl M. Hinkle, Betty Jane Rost, William J. Sproule; Instructors 
Mary Gardner, Susan Hihhs, Janet Hutchinson, Margie Schaeffer. 

The Department of Health, Physical Education and Athletics serves the student com- 
munity by providing academic credit to fulfill the College's General Education Requirement. 
Credit is granted for participation in intercollegiate athletics and physical activities courses 
designed to be of life-long benefit to the individual. 

There is no major degree program in Health, and Physical Education; a minor em- 
phasis is provided in Elementary Education. 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 
(Code 05) 

Courses marked t are acceptable in fulfilling the four semester hours of Physical 
Education required in General Education. 

05.101 VARSITY BASEBALL | 1 sem. hr. 

05.102 VARSITY BASKETBALL | 1 sem. hr. 

05.103 VARSITY FIELD HOCKEY | 1 sem. hr. 

05.104 VARSITY FOOTBALL | 1 sem. hr. 

05.105 VARSITY SOCCER f 1 sem. hr. 

05.106 VARSITY SWIMMING AND DIVING | 1 sem. hr. 

05.107 VARSITY TENNIS t 1 sem. hr. 

05.108 VARSITY TRACK, FIELD, CROSS COUNTRY | 1 sem. hr. 

05.109 VARSITY WRESTLING | 1 sem. hr. 

05.110 VARSITY GOLF f 1 sem. hr. 

05.111 VARSITY LACROSSE lsem.hr. 

The above courses are opportunity for the more skilled individual to participate on 
the inter-collegiate level, and enhance the overall development of the person via the 
experiences encountered sociologically and psychologically. A student may receive no more 
than two (2) semester hours of the required General Education credit in any one varsity 
sport. 

05.149 AQUATICS (For Non-Swimmers) t 1 sem. hr. 

Provides opportunity to make the proper physical and mental adjustment to water; 
basic skills as provided by the American Red Cross with specific emphasis on becoming safe 
in, on, or about a body of water. 

05.150 AQUATICS (Beginning) f 1 sem. hr. 

Same content as 05.149 but adapted to beginning skills. 

05.151 AQUATICS (Intermediate) t 1 sem. hr. 

Preview of basic aquatic skills; advanced skills and swimming strokes with emphasis 
on form and efficiency; elementary rescue and aquatic games. 



! 14 Hi M Hi \m> PHYSU \i EDI I mi«»n 

05.155 S\M\1N \MI( s 1 sem. hr. 

05.160 HEALTH AND THE NATURE OF MAN m. hrv 

Specific health needs ol College students and the uorld in which thc> will |i\c. 

05.214 I r\( IN(. I stm. hr. 

05.219 TENNIS + 1 sem. hr. 

05.222 CREATIVE DAN< I 1 sem. hr. 

05.223 MODERN DANCE + 1 sem. hr. 

05.224 FITNESS DANCE (1 credit) Approved 2/23/79 

\o provide a method of cardiovascular endurance in a particular interest area. The 
course vs ill partly fulfil] the Physical Education requirement and will economically provide 
lor a sizeable number of students with little cost. 

05.228 GYMNASTICS + 1 stm. hr. 

05.230 WEIGHT TRAINING AND FITNESS f 1 *?m. hr. 

05.231 ARC HERY + I sem. hr. 

05.232 BOWLING (fee required) + 1 sem. hr. 

05.233 BADMINTON + 1 sem hr 

05.234 GOLF (fee may be required) + 1 sem. hr. 

05.235 RIFLERV (fee required) + I sem. hr. 

05.236 VOLLEYBALL + 1 sem. hr. 

05.237 MODIFIED PHYSICAL EDUCATION + I sem. hr. 
(for approved students only) 

05.238 RAC 01 ETBALL-HANDBALL + 1 MM. hr 

05.239 SQUARE DANCI lsem.hr. 

05.240 SIIMNASTICS AND FITNESS lsem.hr. 

05.241 II DO— SELF DEFENSE + I mm. hr. 

05.242 PHYSIOLOGICAL AND MEDICAI vspkis 

Of ITHLETU ( OA< KING 3 sem. hrv 

BMM anatomical and physiological factors affecting movement, endurance, strength. 

and conditioning in sports; equipment, training; care ot iniunes. satct\ problems, and 

medical research relating to athletics. 

05.243 B\( KP\( KIN(. 1 sem. hr. 

05.244 ORIEN I 1 ERING 1 sem. hr. 

05.245 CANOEING 1 sem. hr. 

05.246 BEGINNING SKIN AND SCUBA DIVING lsem.hr. 

Quest summer semester 



Health \\i> Physii \i Educai k»n i is 

05.247 ROCK CLIMBING f 1 sem. hr. 

For the beginning rock climbing enthusiast with basic knowledge, skills, and 
practical application of it in actual rock climbing experiences. This will lerve as a founda- 
tion for further experiences in this area ol recreation. 

05.248 BASIC SAILING t I sem. hr. 

05.249 SYNCHRONIZED SWIMMING + 1 sem. hr. 

Designed to give students a basic background in the fundamental skills, strokes and 
movement progressions involved in devoloping a basic routine. 

05.250 ADVANCED LIFE SAVING f 2 sem. hrs. 

Opportunity to attain American Red Cross Advanced Life Saving Certificate. 

05.251 TECHNIQUES OF COACHING AND 

OFFICIATING BASEBALL 3 sem. hrs. 

05.252 TECHNIQUES OF COACHING AND 

OFFICIATING BASKETBALL 3 sem. hrs. 

05.353 TECHNIQUES OF COACHING AND 

OFFICIATING FOOTBALL 3 sem. hrs. 

Advanced instruction and practice in offensive and defensive fundamentals for each 
position; organizational methods and coaching principles and officiating skills. 

05.256 TECHNIQUES OF COACHING AND OFFICIATING 

CROSS COUNTRY, TRACK AND FIELD 3 sem. hrs. 

05.254 TECHNIQUE OF COACHING AND 

OFFICIATING FIELD HOCKEY 3 sem. hrs. 

05.257 TECHNIQUES OF COACHING AND 

OFFICATING WRESTLING 3 sem. hrs. 

05.260 TECHNIQUES OF COACHING AND 

OFFICIATING SWIMMING 3 sem. hrs. 

Techniques of coaching, swimming, diving and rule interpretations and duties of of- 
ficial. 

05.270 EXERCISE AND YOU (3 contact hrs.) f 2 sem. hrs. 

The academic coverage involves study of appropriate physiological functions, 
exercise physiology, mechanical implications, fitness measurement, procedures, and practical 
application through programmed exercise. 

05.271 INTERMEDIATE ARCHERY t 1 sem. hr. 

To provide the opportunity for the student to develop shooting skills to the best of 
his own ability. 

05.272 INTERMEDIATE BOWLING (fee required) f 1 sem. hr. 

This course is intended to develop advanced skill and knowledge of bowling. 

05.273 INTERMEDIATE GOLF (fee may be required) t 1 sem. hr. 

Instruction in the techniques and strategy involved in improving the individual skills 
of the student. 

05.274 INTERMEDIATE TENNIS f 1 sem. hr. 

To improve the tennis skills of each individual. 



1 16 Hi u hi vm> PHYSN m 1 di < mON 

05.275 INTERMEDIATE VOLLEY1AU lsrm.hr. 

I his intermediate le\el course is mostlv participation and will include the develop- 
ment and histor\ of vollcvball along with the improvement ol fundamental skills, team : 
and Strategy 

05.276 INTERMED1 Ml J1 DO (1 credit) Approved 2/23/79 

Intended tor those students vsho wish to continue studv in the area, and will provide 
an opportunity to develop higher levels ol skill competencies. I he course will partiallv fulfill 
the Physical Education requirements 

05.311 Mr I hods \M) MATERIALS IN ELEMENTAR1 

s( HOOL PHYSICAL EDUCATION 3 sem. hn>. 

Provides principles and procedures to meet the needs and interests of elementary age 
children in the area o\ physical education. 

05.320 HEALTH AND SAFETY IN THE 

ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 

Provides students with health knowledge and training in the areas of elementarv 
school environment and health appraisal techniques for teaching elementary school health, 
the elementarv school health program, and safety education in the elementary school. 

05.321 FIRST AID SAFETY J stm. hrv 

Designed for the person who needs training in first aid and safety Red Cross Stan- 
dard. Advanced, and Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation certification may be obtained. 

05.331 RECREATIONAL EDI CATION 3 sem. hrv 

Discussion of, and practice in, recreation activities used in school and playground 
situations. Emphasis is placed on recreation planning, techniques of leadership, and worth) 
use of leisure time. 

05.333 SCHOOL CAMPING AND Ol TDOOR EDUCATION 3 >em. hrv 

Designed to acquaint students with the scope of organized camping and the acquisi- 
tion of and practices in the basic skills required of individuals involved in camping and out- 
door education training. Field experiences. 

05 .350 WATER SAFETY INSTRUCTOR + 2 sen hrv 

Review o\ the nine basic swimming strokes and advanced life saving skills with an 
opportunity to analyze stroke mechanics, teaching methods and provisions, or the 
knowledge required tor satisfactory completion. Awarding o! an American Red ( 
Water Saletv Instructor Certificate is based on final evaluation. 
Prerequisite: A valid American Red Crow Advanced I ife Saving Ccriu. 
prior to starting date of course, sound physical condition, and a R 
tificate or the ability to perform the swimmer count skills. 

05.411 ADAPTED PHYSH vi EDUI \im\ Saea. fas. 

Stud) and practice in techniques used bv physical educators to recognize and meet 
problems o! the handicapped 

05.420 IK HNIQ1 ES in HI vi IH VND PHYSH vi EDI ( MION 

FOR STM I VI EDI ( VIION n V( IIIKs 3 sem. hrs. 

Sound principles and proccduics tor meeting physical, emotional and social needs ot 
the mcntallv retarded 

05.430 CURRENT ISSUES IN HEALTH EDUCATION 3 sem. hrs. 

Majoi problems which 0000011 communities todav drugs, venereal disease, pollu- 
tion, alcohol, and sexualitv Restricted to seniors and in-service teachers. 



History Cot rses 1 1 7 



HISTORY 

1 ACULTY: 

Professors Robert I). Warren (Chairperson), Hans K. Gunther, Craig A. Newton, H. 
Benjamin Powell. James R. S perry; Assoeiate Professors Richard (i. Anderson, John C. 
Dietrich, Arthur Lysiak, rheodore Shanoski, Ralph Smiley, Anthony J. Sylvester, (ieorge 
\ I inner. James R. Whitmer, John B. Williman. 

HISTORY: 

Arts and Sciences Major for the B.A. degree: 

History 42.398; 27 semester hours elective in courses in history including at least 15 
semester hours numbered above 300. 

HISTORY SATELLITE PROGRAM 

The history satellite course program is an innovative approach to provide greater 
flexibility in the history curriculum, to offer students more choice and better scheduling op- 
portunities to enroll in history courses. Under the proposal a designated three semester 
credit history course can be offered at a reduced credit value or for an increased one 
semester credit value equivalent to class time and course content. Two approaches, "satellite 
segment course: and "Satellite derivation course," are available for a student to take a frac- 
tion or an extension of an existing three credit semester course. The "satellite segment 
course" permits a student to enroll in a reduced portion of a designated course for either 
one or two credits. The "satellite derivation course: allows a student to enroll in a specially 
designed one semester credit course, for an enrichment or concentrated study of a signifi- 
cant topic or theme from the content of the three semester credit course. 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS 

(Code 42) 

Courses marked f may be used toward General Education. 
Prerequisites are subject to modification by the instructor. 

42.100 TRANS-ATLANTIC WORLD IN THE 20TH CENTURY 3 sem. hrs. 

Thematic and interdisciplinary approaches to the examination of the trans-Atlantic 
World. Consideration is given to the social, political, economic and intellectual develop- 
ments. Paramount emphasis is placed on the inter-connectedness of the twentieth century 
experiences of the Americas and countries of Western Europe. 

42.112 ORIGINS OF THE MODERN WORLD f 3 sem. hrs. 

Political, economic, social, and intellectual forces that shaped the story of mankind 
from the early Renaissance to the nineteenth century. 

42.113 THE MODERN WORLD f 3 sem. hrs. 

Political, economic, social, intellectual, and technological elements of nineteenth and 
twentieth century history, showing the progress of the Western tradition and the growing 
importance of the non-Western world. 

42.121 UNITED STATES HISTORY SURVEY: 

COLONIAL PERIOD OF 1877 | 3 sem. hrs. 

A chronological history to 1877 with emphasis on the evolution of political, eco- 
nomic, social and cultural aspects. 

42.122 UNITED STATES HISTORY SURVEY: 

1877 TO THE PRESENT t 3 sem. hrs. 

Political, social, intellectual and economic developments of the United States from 
Reconstruction to the present. 



I ! - History Courses 

42.133 THE ANCIENT AND MEDIEVAL WORLDS > sens. Ism. 

\ mrvey course rrom (he Ancient • to the fall of the Roman Empire in the 

West, emphasizing Grace, Rome, and the rise of Christianity; a stud> of the people and 
countries oi the West which emerged following the fall of the Roman r mpire. with an em- 
phasis on feudalism, manorialism and the medieval church. 

42.208 ( ONTEMPORARY ISSUES IN UNITED SI Mfs HIS I OR \ 3 sem. hrs. 

An examination of important social, political, and foreign affairs issues within a his- 
torical framework which have current significance and are of concern in American societv 

42.223 ECONOMIC HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES + 3 sem. hrs. 

To understand the changing nature of the American economy, this cou- 
three time periods: the commercial-agricultural age, the industrial age. and the modern 
managerial age. Agriculture, hanking, husiness administration, commerce, labor, manu- 
facturing, mining and transportation; social and political factors that contributed to chang- 
ing economic relationships in the United States. 

42.225 AFRO-AMERICAN HISTORY + 3 sem hrs 

A historical examination of the black African heritage, travail of slavery, release 
from bondage, accommodation and protest, racial violence, black nationalism, civil rights 
struggle, and significance and influence in United States history. 

42.227 THE AMERICAN WOMAN: 

ACCOMPLISHMENTS AND ASPIRATIONS + 3 sem hrs 

Identification of the status, roles and achievements of American women from the 
lonial period to the present. Historical events or trends which elevated or diminished 
women's place in American society. The attitude of men towards women and their roles so 
that the advancement of the latter will be perceived to result from the interaction of sexes 
which produced the major turning points of the "woman question" in American History. 

42.229 MODERN WORLD LEADERS + 3 sem hrs 

A study of significant world leaders in religion, politics, war and culture and their 
impact upon world history. Course will focus on different leaders each time offered and will 
cover a selected period from the Renaissance to the present. Course will begin anal>^ 
the conditions which helped produce these leaders and will end by discussing reasons tor 
their success or failure. Only leaders who have made a significant contribution outside their 
national boundaries will be considered tor inclusion in the course 

42.246 MODERN EUROPEAN THOUGHT AND SOCIETY + 3 sem hrs 

Changes in currents oi thought during the period are related to political, economic, 
and social de\elopments. Special attention gi\en to interpretations oi major intellectual 

movements. 

42.255 HEALTH PROFESSIONALS WD 

HEALTH issi fs IN HISTORY + 3 sem. hrs. 

A sur\e\ ot the evolution ot medicine, nursing, and other health professions within 
the cultural, social, political, religious, intellectual, and economic contexts ot Western 
li/ation Although attention will be channeled to the delineation o\ scientific and 
technological idvanCCS, primar\ foCUS will be upon the connections between the health 
sciences and bioad historical motifs I he historic scope o\ the course is from antiquit> to 
the present, the most detailed treatments ot siibiecl matter. howe\cr. will in\ol\e the 
nineteenth and twentieth centuries 

42.260 Sl'ORI \\l) S()( IF \\ IN \MFRK \ 3 sem. hrs. 

A cultural approach to organized sport in the U.S. which proceeds from the premise 
that sport mirrors the \alues. states ot technolog\ and the conditions o\ society. Emptuu 

on the rise ol sport as a positi\e rellection social \alue. its evolution toward serving as a 



History Coi uses 1 19 

crucial outlet in mass culture, the impact of business, commercialism, leisure, affluence, ur- 
banism and nationalism, and the problems of governance and law. 

42.275 HISTORY OF CHRISTIANITY + 3 sem. hrs. 

A survey course in the history of the branches of Christianity through twenty 
centuries. Emphasis is placed on institutional and doctrinal development, focusing mainly 
on Western European Christianity. Concentrated study of some of the great men in Chris- 
tian history; the papacy and some of the great popes; movements of the 18th century, end- 
ing with the ecumenical movement and the Vatican Councils. 

42.282 MILITARY HISTORY II + 3 sem. hrs. 

A study of organized warfare and the theory of war from the Napoleonic age to the 
present. Concentrating on strategy and tactics, this course still examines the socio-political 
background, especially of the two world wars and the age of the guerilla. 

42.318 EARLY ENGLAND: THE MAKING OF AN ISLAND STATE t 3 sem. hrs. 

Political, economic, social, and cultural life in England to the Glorious Revolution. 

42.319 MODERN ENGLAND: THE FIRST INDUSTRIAL EMPIRE t 3 sem. hrs. 

Political, social, economic, and cultural developments in England from the Glorious 
Revolution to the present with emphasis upon the development of democracy, the Industrial 
Revolution and the growth and decline of the British Empire. 

42.322 RENAISSANCE AND REFORMATION ERAS 3 sem. hrs. 

Political, social, economic, literary, artistic, and intellectual developments from c. 
1300 in Italy and including the spread of the Renaissance throughout Europe; also a critical 
study of the Protestant and Catholic reformations in relation to the political, economic, 
social, and cultural developments in Western Europe in the 16th and 17th centuries. 
Prerequisite: 42.1 1 1 or 42.112. 

42.323 EUROPEAN IMPERIALISM: THE 

ENCOUNTER OF RACES AND SOCIETIES 3 sem. hrs. 

A general basic study of the commingling of the races of mankind, and of modern 
with traditional societies; in the course of European overseas expansion, with the creation 
of a global economy, global politics, and the problem of the underdeveloped world. 

42.324 REVOLUTIONARY EUROPE AND THE RISE 

OF MODERN TRADITIONS, 1600-1789 3 sem. hrs. 

Rise of the modern state; political, intellectual, social, economic, and cultural aspects 
of the eras of the Scientific Revolution and Enlightenment; the establishment of European 
world hegemony and a world economy; diplomatic and military interaction of the European 
states. 

42.326 EUROPE 1789-1914 3 sem. hrs. 

Political and military events within their economic, social, intellectual, religious, and 
artistic setting from the French Revolution through the Industrial Revolution and the Unifi- 
cation of Italy and Germany to the diplomatic crises that led to the First World War. 

42.335 COMMUNIST EASTERN EUROPE 3 sem. hrs. 

An introductory look at the European world beyond the Iron Curtain: its ethno-lin- 
guistic patterns as the original home of a number of American immigrant peoples; its 
experience as a laboratory of applied Communist theory since 1945. 

42.347 HISTORY OF THE HOLOCAUST 3 sem. hrs. 

After briefly tracing the history of antisemitism and evaluating scope of predjudice, 
discrimination and genocide in contemporary civilization this course will focus upon its 
major theme — the genesis and implementation of the planned destruction of European 



120 His mm ( <>! RSI s 

. from 1933 to 1^45 Che course will include with an analysis ol the literature of the 
Holocaust and an evaluation of the impact ol the Holocaust upon modern and 

the world .Icuish community 

42.351 I \ I IN W1FKK \ : IMF COLONIA1 PERIOD 3 sem. hrv 

Ihc extension ol Iberian institutions to the New World and the acculturation 
process 1 lamination and evaluation ol the economic, social and religious institution 
Portuguese and Spanish America in the colonial period. I4s>2- 

42.352 LATIN AMERICA: THE NATIONAL PERIOD t 3sem.hr*. 

After | bnet summarv of the course and results ol the revolutionary era. attent: 
devoted to the economic, social, and political development of individual nations 

42.354 THE RISK OF MODERN ( HINA TO MAO TSK-Tl \(. 3 sem. hrs. 

A historv of China from the coming of the West to the present The main thread of 
the course is an analysis ol China's strategy tor survival under the impact of foreign 
ideologies and economics. Special attention will he paid to the rise of power of Mao Tse- 
Tung and his policies 

42.356 RUSSIA TO THE BOLSHEVIK REVOLUTION 3 sem hrs 

Survey ol Russia from the beginning of the Russian State in the ninth centurv 
through the Kievan, Muscovite, and Imperial periods to the Bolshevik Revolution o\ 19 T 

42.358 BLACK AFRICA I sem hrs 

Survey of the transformation of the societies of Sub-Sahara Africa from colonialism 
to national independence. 

42.362 THE ARAB WORLD MSB. hrv 

An introductory look at the Middle East. Islamic society and religion, the Arab-Is- 
raeli problem, and the politics o\ oil. 

42.372 COLONIAL AMERICA AND THE 

W AR OF INDEPENDENCE 3 sem hrs. 

European colonization in North America, with major attention to the establishment 

and development of England's thirteen colonies, an emerging American society, and the 

problems which created the conflict between the Americans ,md the British Empire resulting 
in the American Ware of Independence 

42.373 THI I NITED STATES FROM 

NATIONHOOD TO CIVH WAR 3 seat hrs. 

A Study ol forces contributing to nation building, democratization and reform 
cictv. (actors stimulating expansion; issues causing dis-union. and travail ol the Civil W| 

42.375 \\\Y UNITED SI Mis FROM ITU 

( imi w \R 10 WORLD POWER 3 sem. hrv 

Majoi topics such as the Civil War, Reconstruction, the Gilded Vge, Emergence 

Big Business. Social Darwinism, Populism. Progreaiivism and World w s elect ed for 

discussion 

42.377 ( ONTEMPOR \R^ I NITED SI Ml S, 

wori D WAR I TO THI PRESEN1 3 seta, hrs. 

Majoi themes such as Republican ascendancv I DR and the New Deal, the Cold 
Vs ,- minontv rights, violence in conicmpoi.u v America, militarism, and the role ol the in- 
dividual in today's societv iTC selected fol discussion 

42.383 IMF ( OMK si RIPS 

I ectures discussions ol majoi themes expressed in the comic strip and comic 

hooks 



HisTom ( 01 ksis 121 

42.388 PENNSY1 VANIA 3 sem. hrs. 

Major contributions ot PeiUIS) Kama to national life; relations between state and na- 
tional movements. 

42 391 DIPLOMATIC HISTORY OF THE 

UNITED M VI KS TO 1898 + 3 sem. hrs. 

A critical analysis ot United States foreign relations from the Colonial period to the 
war with Spain. 

42.392 DIPLOMATIC HISTORY OF THE 

UNITED STATES SINCE 1898 + 3 sem. hrs. 

A critical analysis of United States foreign relations from the uar with Spain in 1898 
to the present. 

42.397 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN HISTORY 1-4 sem. hrs 

The topic selected must be approved by a committee appointed by the chairperson. 
Independent reading and or research related to some aspect of history is supervised by an 
appropriate member of the department. A student may register for this course no more than 
twice and for a total which does not exceed four semester hours. 
Prerequisite: 60 semester hours college credit. [see section 7.5] 

42.398 RESEARCH AND WRITING SKILLS 3 sem. hrs. 

Basic historical bibliography with exercises in location and use; analysis of problems 
and tools of research and a practical application of research methods. 

42.401 CURRENT EVENTS IN HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE 3 sem. hrs. 

Selected topics from the headlines of the current year with their historical back- 
ground and significance. Designed to fit the present world into a larger perspective and to 
develop a better understanding of historical forces at work. 
Prerequisite: 3 sem. hrs. of history. 

42.424 EUROPE 1914-1939; THE FIRST WORLD WAR 

AND THE AGE OF THE DICTATORS 3 sem. hrs. 

The decline and fall of European hegemony in world affairs and the traditional stan- 
dards of Western society under the impact of the "Great War" and the "Great Depression." 
The phenomenon of totalitarianism as it manifested itself in fascist Italy. Nazi Germany, 
and communist Russia. 
Prerequisite: 42. 1 13. 

42.425 EUROPE SINCE 1939 3 sem. hrs. 

A survey of the major European powers in the iate 1930's. emphasizing the policies 
of the dictators leading to war: military and diplomatic developments of World War II and 
the causes of the East-West rift; the reconstruction of democracy in Europe; the formation 
of the Soviet bloc; European integration; important current political trends in the major 
power systems. 
Prerequisite: 42. 1 13. 

42.452 SOVIET RUSSIA 3 sem. hrs. 

Critical analysis of the political, social, economic, and cultural evolution of the So- 
viet Union, and a study of Soviet foreign policy and international relations. 
Prerequisite: 42.113. 

42.453 PROBLEMS OF CONTEMPORARY LATIN AMERICA 3 sem. hrs. 
Analysis of recent events or movements that may indicate recurrence of historical 

problems or major developments of international significance in selected countries of Latin 

America. 

Prerequisite: 3 sem. hrs. of history. 



122 History Coi kms 

42.454 MODERN JAPAN: IMF EMERGENCE 

<H \n \si\n SUPERPOWER laakn, 

•\n analytil of Japan's changing social, political, and economic strategics from the 
Meiji Restoration to the present, uuh a concise description ol Japanese culture during the 
period 

iuisiu 42.113. 

42.456 TWENTIETH CENTURA MIDDLE EAS1 

AND NORTH AFRICA * sem. hrs. 

Intensive study of critical social, political and economic problems of the contempo- 
rary peoples and nations in these regions. 
Prerequisite: 42.1 12 or 42.113. 

42.471 THE GROWTH OF BUSINESS IN AMERH \ 3 sem. hrs 
The industrialization of the American economy is traced within a br and 

political context. Major attention is directed toward the industrial revolution, the emergence 
of big business at the turn of the twentieth century, and the corporate revolution, and the 
place of major industries at mid-century. 
Prerequisite: 3 sem. hrs. of history. 

42.472 HISTORY OF LABOR IN THE UNITED STATES 3 sem hrs. 

Surveys the problems of labor from the colonial period to the present, vsith emp 
upon the development of unions and their role in national life. 
Prerequisite: 3 sem. hrs. of history. 

42.483 POPULAR CULTURE IN AMERICA 3 sem hrs 

Thematic description and analysis of major forms of popular culture in America 
from Colonial times to the present. Subjects include literature, the arts, drama, decoration, 
and recreation. 
Prerequisite: 3 sem. hrs. of historv. 




r 



k 



I\ ii kdis( [PI i\ \h\ Si i DIES 123 

INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES 

Hans Karl Gunther, Coordinator of Inter-disciplinary Programs. 

Note: Inter-disciplinary courses listed in this section are planned, and often staffed, 
by members of more than one department. The Coordinator of Inter-disciplinary 
Programs bears administrative responsibility for their scheduling. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 
(Code 09) 

Course designated t may be used towards General Education 

09.111 INTRODUCTION TO THE PEOPLES 

OF THE THIRD WORLD f 3 sem. hrs. 

The peoples of the Far and Middle East, Africa, and Latin America, their art, litera- 
ture, philosophy, cultural geography, and history, sketching their importance in the world. 

09.211 HISTORY OF SCIENTIFIC THOUGHT | 3 sem. hrs. 

Historical development of the natural sciences and mathematics; the nature of scien- 
tific and mathematical thought and methods; the characteristics of these disciplines and 
their significance to human progress. 

09.213 SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY, AND HUMAN VALUES 3 sem. hrs. 

Investigates the impact of the scientific and technological discoveries on the thinking 
process and the decision-making process. Human perception of science and technology and 
the technological impact on human ideas on society, ethics, and epistemology will be 
studies, along with practical application of the possibilities afforded by the technological 
age. 

09.250 FRENCH HISTORY AND CULTURE I f 3 sem. hrs. 

From the Gallo-Roman beginnings to the present; emphasis upon the social, cultural, 
economic, and political contributions of France to the shaping of Western Civilization. 

09.251 FRENCH HISORY AND CULTURE II f 3 sem. hrs. 

Transformation of France from the Old Regime into a modern nation; the interac- 
tion between social, cultural, economic, and political life in France and her importance in 
Western Civilization 

09.311 SEMINAR IN AMERICAN STUDIES, PART I 3 sem. hrs. 

To be required of all majors in proposed baccalaureate program in American 
Studies, but open to all juniors in Arts and Sciences College. Designed to give the student a 
thorough appreciation of our variegated heritage and research materials and resources 
available for deepening the knowledge of this growing area of inquiry. 

09.312 SEMINAR IN AMERICAN STUDIES, PART II 3 sem. hrs. 

To be required of all junior level majors in the baccalaureate program in American 
Studies. Continues the endeavor to convey a thorough appreciation of the variegated 
American heritage and the research materials and resources available for deepending the 
knowledge of this growing area of inquiry. 

09.401 HISTORY AND POLITICS OF USSR 3 sem. hrs. 

Combines the study of the history of the USSR with the approaches of political 
science. Primarily offered in the summer. Will involve the students in a tour of areas of the 
USSR. 



124 In n KDls( ll'l ISXFO Sit DIES 

09.421 SENIOR SEMINAR IN AMERICAN STUDIES I srm. hrv 

Id be required ot all American Studies majors but open to all juniors in the School 
of Arts and Sciences, team-taught by members of at least two different departments and 
including on-site inspections wherever possible Independent research among the materials 
available in this growing field of inquir> will be required, culminating in an oral or written 
report Organization will result trom a problems-approach, and material will be contempo- 
rar\ in perspective 

09.431 SOCIALISM: THEORY iND HISTORY 3 sem. hrv 

Historical and theoretical study of the socialist idea and its various attempted realiza- 
tions from biblical times to the present. 




Mm hi mums ( !oi ksi s 125 

MATHEMATICS 



FACULTY: 



Professors Harold J. Bailey, Stephen D. Beck (Chairperson), Charles M. Brennan, JoAnne 
S. Growney, June L. Trudnak; Associate Professors Leroy H. Brown, Paul G. Hartung, 
James E. Kerlin, Jr., Robert L. Klinedinst, Joseph E. Mueller, Ronald W. Novak, Clinton 
J. Oxenrider, James C. Pomfret; Assistant Professor Thomas L. Ohl, Paul C. Cochrane. 

MATHEMATICS: 

Arts and Sciences major for the B.A. degree: 

Mathematics 53.125, 126; 171 or 172; 211, 225, 226, 241; 15 semester hours elected 
from 53.231, 271, 312, 314, 322, 331, 341, 371, 373, 381, 411, 421, 422, 451, 461, 
471, 472, 491, 492; six to eight semester hours in a discipline to which mathematics 
is applied, as approved by the advisor. 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 
(Code 53) 

Note: Courses marked t may be applied toward General Education. Requirements 
for the major for the B.S. in Education degree are given in Section 8.02.1. 

53.101 FUNDAMENTALS OF MATHEMATICS j 3 sem. hrs. 

An informal investigation of a collection of mathematical concepts designed to pro- 
mote inductive reasoning and illustrate the role of mathematics in our society. Suitable for 
humanities majors. 

53.110 BASIC ALGEBRA t 3 sem. hrs. 

A study of fundamental algebraic methods for students whose previous mathematical 
background is weak. Elementary algebraic relationships, functions, and solution of equa- 
tions. Emphasis on developing skills. 
Permission of Mathematics Department Chairperson is required. 

53.111 FINITE MATHEMATICS | 3 sem. hrs. 

An Introductory development of logic and sets provides the foundation for the study 
of counting techniques and probability spaces. 

53.112 TRIGONOMETRY | 3 sem. hrs. 

The study of natural trigonometric ratios and applications, extended to circular func- 
tions. 

53.113 PRE-CALCULUS f 3 sem. hrs. 

Elementary algebraic functions and relations; exponential and logarithmic functions; 
circular functions and inverse functions. 

53.114 COLLEGE ALGEBRA FOR BUSINESS APPLICATIONS j 3 sem. hrs. 

Development of fundamental mathematical concepts and the computational skills 
necessary to use these concepts in the modern world of business. 
Prerequisite: I x h years of high school algebra or the equivalent. 

53.118 APPLIED MATRIX ALGEBRA t 3 sem. hrs. 

Introduction to vectors, matrices, linear equations, and linear programming with ap- 
plications to the social and biological sciences. 

53.123 ESSENTIALS OF CALCULUS f 3 sem. hrs. 

Basic computational concepts of elementary calculus, differentiation and integration 
as used in non-physical science applications. Less rigorous than 125-126. An adequate back- 
ground in algebra is needed and some trigonometry would be helpful. 



I 26 M \ I 111 M \ I l< s ( iOI KM s 

53.125 \\\MMSl + 3 sem. hrs. 
Differentiation and integration ot I unctions of a single real variable including algeb- 
raic and transcendental functions 

53.126 ANALYSIS II + 3 sem. hrs. 
Techniques oi integration, infinite series, Taylor's Theorem, differential equations. 

and an introduction to partial derivatives. 
Prerequisite: 53 J 25. 

53.141 INTRODUCTORY STATISTICS + 3 sem. hrs. 

Reading, interpreting and constructing tables of statistical data; statistical measure; 
application of basic skills of statistics. 
Prerequisite: 53.111, or permission of instructor. 

53.171 INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER PROGRAMMING + 1 sem hr. 

An introduction to mathematically-oriented computer programming using the 
Fortran language with examples written and executed on the college computer. 

53.172 INTRODUCTION TO BASIC COMPUTER PROGRAMMING + 1 sem hr 

Interactive computer programming using the Basic language. Communication vuth 
the computer via remote terminals. 

53.173 COMPUTERS AND SOCIETY f 1 sem hr 

A survey of the history, applications, and implications of computers. A non-technical 
overview for students in all disciplines. 

53.201 THEORY OF ARITHMETIC + 3 sem. hrs. 

The language of sets; the four elementary operations through the real number 
system; elementary theory of numbers. 

Prerequisite: For Elementary Education, Special Education, or Communication Disorders 
majors only. Sophomore standing required. 

53.202 GEOMETRY FOR ELEMENTARY TEACHERS 3 sem. hrs. 

Informal geometry, including area and volume. A non-rigorous examination o\ 
groups, rings, and fields. 
Prerequisite: 53.20 1 . 

53.203 FIELD WORK IN MATHEMATICS + 3 sem hrs 

Instruments used in the field are the slide rule, angle mirror, clinometer, plane tabic, 
transit. (Summer only.) 

53.204 MEASUREMENT AND METRIC SYSTEM FOR TEACHERS + 1 sem. hr 

The metric system and techniques o\ teaching it. Preparation o\ the student for a 
metric society Group and individual pedagogy. 

53.211 INTRODUCTION TO MODERN ALGEBRA + 3 sem hrs 

An introduction to the language and methods of abstract mathematics Subjects dis- 
cussed include sets, iclalions. (unctions, groups, rings and fields. 
Prerequisite: 53.125. 

53.225 ANALYSIS III 3 sem. hrs. 
VeCtOI analytU in R and R With extension tO R n ; s\ stems or linear equations, ma- 
trix algebra, linear transformations, and Euclidean Space. 

Prerequisite: 53.125 or 53.122. 

53.226 ANALYSIS IV 3 sem. hrs. 

Curvet and parametric equations, surfaces. Ia\lor\ Theorem, functions from R m to 
R n and multiple integrals 
PrerequisUi 



Maiiii MAI l( s Coi RSI S L 17 

53.231 COLLEGE GEOMETRY f 3 sem. hrs. 

Elementary geometry from an advanced standpoint. Incidence in the plane and 
space, congruence, inequality and similarity concepts. Properties of polygons, circles and 
spheres. 

53.241 PROBABILITY AND STATISTICS t 3 sem. hrs. 

Descriptive and inferential statistics with emphasis on probabilistic distribution. 
Practical training in the calculation of various statistical measures obtained in the labora- 
tory. Primarily for mathematics majors. 

53.271 ALGORITHMIC PROCESSES FOR COMPUTERS | 3 sem. hrs. 

Properties of algorithms; languages used in described algorithms; application of a 
precedure-oriented language (Fortran) to problem-solving. 
Prerequisite: 53.171, 53.172, 44.418, or 92.252. 

53.311 ALGEBRA FOR SECONDARY SCHOOL TEACHERS 3 sem. hrs. 

Topics of elementary algebra from an advanced viewpoint. Consideration will be 
given to topics of contemporary school mathematics programs. (Spring only.) 
Prerequisite: Ed. 65.352 or permission of instructor. 

53.314 LINEAR ALGEBRA 3 sem. hrs. 

Study of abstract vector spaces, linear transformations, matrices, determinants, inner 
product spaces, spectral theory, and related topics. (Alternate years; next offered Fall 1980.) 
Prerequisite: 53.225. 

53.322 DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS 3 sem. hrs. 

Study of elementary ordinary differential equations; infinite series and power series, 
and La Place transforms. (Spring only.) 
Prerequisite: 53.225. 

53.331 MODERN GEOMETRY 3 sem. hrs. 

Non-Euclidean geometries and their development from postulate systems and a 
formal approach to projective geometry. (Alternate years. Next offered Spring, 1980.) 

53.341 ADVANCED STATISTICS 3 sem. hrs. 

Emphasis on continuous probability spaces, statistical distributions, and applications 
of statistics. (Alternate years, 1979-1981.) 
Prerequisite: 53.241 and 53.126. 

53.371 COMPUTER ORGANIZATION 3 sem. hrs. 

Computer components and their organization; compiler and assembly systems; 
input/ output; subroutines and macros. (Alternate years. Next offered Fall, 1980.) 

53.372 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS IN 

SECONDARY SCHOOL MATHEMATICS 3 sem. hrs. 

Techniques for incorporating computers in the mathematics curriculum in secondary 
schools. Preparation and use of computer-assisted instruction, using the Basic and Fortran 
languages. (Fall only.) 
Prerequisite: 53.271 and permission of the instructor. 

53.373 NUMERICAL METHODS IN COMPUTING | 3 sem. hrs. 

Study of various algorithms for the solution of nonlinear equations; the solution of 
simultaneous equations; interpolation of data; numerical integration; graph theory; and 
linear programming. The student will execute most of the algorithms using the computer. 
(Fall only.) 
Prerequisite: 53.271 and 53.123 or 53.125. 



A Mill MATH 1 COI Ksjs 

53.3X1 INTROD1 ( HON I(> OPERATIONS RESEAR4 H .Wm. hrv 

A sur\c\ ol the methods and models used in applying mathematics to problems of 
Business lopics to be drawn from decision making, linear and dynamic programming, net- 
works, inventory models, Markoi processes, and queuing theory. (Alternate vears. 1979- 
1961.) 
Prerequisite: 53.225 and 53.271 or 53.118 and 53.123. 

53.411 INTRODUCTION TO GROUP THEORY 3 sem. hrv 

Fundamentals of group theory. Topics included are groups and related systems, 
normal subgroups and homomorphisms, Abelian groups, permutation groups, automor- 
phisms, and free groups. (Alternate years. Next offered Fall, 1980.) 
Prerequisite: 53.211. 

53.421 ADVANCED CALCULUS 3 sem. hrv 

A rigorous treatment of the concepts of limit, continuity, derivative, and integral for 
functions of a single real variable. (Fall only.) 
Prerequisite: 53.221 or 53.226. 

53.422 COMPLEX VARIABLES 3 sem. hrs. 

Presentation of theory through the differential and integral calculus of analytic func- 
tions, residues, and conformal transformations, with applications. (Alternate years. Next 
offered Spring, 1980.) 
Prerequisite: 53.221 or 53.226. 

53.451 INTRODUCTION TO TOPOLOGY 3 sem. hrv 

Fundamentals of general topology: elementary set theory, topological spaces, map- 
pings, connectedness, compactness, completeness, product and metric spaces, nets and con- 
vergence. (Alternate years. Next offered Spring, 1979.) 
Prerequisite: 53.221 or 53.226. 

53.461 NUMBER THEORY 3 sem hrv 

Theory of numbers. Topics included are Euclidean algorithm, congruences, continued 
fractions, Gaussian integers, and Diophantine equations. (Spring only.) 

Prerequisite: 53 21 1. 

53.471 NUMERICAL ANALYSIS 3 sem. hrs. 
A computer-oriented anaksis of algorithms of numerical inftlyi Jiscusted 

include non-linear equations, interpolation and approximation, differentiation and ink. 
turn, matrices, and differential equations. (Alternate years 1979-1961.) 
27i, 53.322 

53.472 MATRIX COMPUTATION 3 sem. hrv 
Co mp uter-Oriented techniques applied 10 invertiOB Of matrices, diagonali/ation o\ 

matrices, kind matrices; and the associated solution o\ linear algebraic equations (Alternate 

I \e\t ottered Spring. 1980.) 
IWnqutute 5SJ7I and 53. IT; 53.212 0§ 

53.491 SI'KUl TOPICS IN MATHEMATICS 3 sem. hrv 

Presentation ot an area ol mathematics which is not available as | regular course of- 
fering. 

• mission of the instructor. 

53.492 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN MATHEMATICS 1-3 sem. hrs. 
A directed studs of I particular area of mathematics as mutually agreed upon by the 

student and his instructor I he emphasis is on individual scholarly activity of the highly 
motivated student. [see section 7.5] 



Miah Coi ksis 129 

MUSIC 



FACULTY: 



Professor William K. Decker, Richard J. Stanislaw (Chairperson); Associate Professors 
John H. Couch, Sylvia H. Cronin, John P. Master, Nelson A. Miller, Stephen Wallace. 

I'hc Department of Music serves the entire college community through its music or- 
ganizations, its opportunity for private lessons, concerts by the ensembles, recitals by 
students ami faculty members, and through courses which may be taken in partial fulfill- 
ment of the Group I requirement in General Education. 

Credit may be earned in seven ensembles, Maroon and Gold Band, Concert Choir, 
W omens Choral Ensemble, College- Community Orchestra, Husky Singers, Studio Band, 
and Madrigal Singers. Enrollment in the ensembles is open upon selection after audition. 
The Ensembles are described as courses 35.1 1 1-35.1 17. A student may receive no more than 
six credits in music ensembles toward a baccalaureate degree. 

Private lessons in organ, piano, strings, woodwinds, brasses, and voice are available 
to properly qualified students. As many as six semester hours may be earned through 
private lessons in one of these instruments in as many consecutive semesters. The number of 
students accepted for private lessons is limited by available faculty, and continuation is 
reserved for those who exhibit continued development. Private lessons are described as 
courses 35.141-35.198. 

MUSIC: 

Arts and Sciences Major for the B.A. degree: 

35.102, 131, 132, 223, 231, 232, 331, 332; 

8 semester hours of ensemble; 

one of the following two options: 

Music History and Literature option — 12 semester hours from 35.221, 222, 323, 
324, 326, 421; 8 semester hours in piano or in another instrument if piano 
competency is met. 

Applied Music option — 3 semester hours in music history; 
16 semester hours in one instrument; 
one semester hour performance seminar. 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 
(Code 35) 

Courses marked t may be applied toward the General Education requirement. 
Courses marked * are offered in alternate years or upon demand. 

35.101 INTRODUCTION TO MUSIC t 3 sem. hrs. 

An approach to music listening through basic vocal and instrumental study. Analysis 
of varied masterpieces, composers, musical forms and styles. No previous musical 
experience necessary. 

35.102 SURVEY OF MUSIC t 3 sem. hrs. 

Same subject matter as 35.101, but designed for students who have had pre-college 
study in a musical instrument or voice; analyses are more detailed than in the above course. 
Not to be scheduled in addition to 35.101. 

35.111 MAROON AND GOLD BAND t lsem.hr. 

Music of varied styles and periods. Four hours per week for two semesters of one 
academic year is required for one semester hour. 

35.112 CONCERT CHOIR + 1 sem . hr. 

Music of varied styles and periods, stressing oratorio and a cappella literature. Three 
hours per week for two semesters for one semester hour. 



I K) Ml III < "< RSB 

35.113 WOMEN'S CHORAL ENSEMBU istm.hr. 

Popular to mastcruorks Ihree hours per week t«>r tuo semesters tor one sen. 
fiour. 

35.114 COLLEGE-COMMUNITY ORCHESTRA t lsem.hr. 

Music appropriate to the small swnphony orchestra luo hours per ueek 

35.115 STUDIO BAM) I stm. hr. 

JaiZ, suing, and other torms representing the dance hand style. Un hours per ueek 

35.116 HI Sk\ SINGERS + 1 stm. hr. 

Popular to masterworks. I wo hours per ueek. 

35.117 MADRIGAL SINGERS + 1 sem. hr. 

Open to singers from other college vocal ensembles who pass the director's audition 
Music chiefly from the Renaissance, but other styles and periods included. Tuo hours per 

ueek. 

35.130 FUNDAMENTAL MUSICIANSHIP 3 sem hrv 

Personal musical development: elementary theory, music reading, singing. plaving 
simple instruments, simple chordings, transpositions, and bodily movement to nunc ! 
gested for elementary and special education majors with little musical background as 
preparation for 35.3 1 1 or 35. 1 3 1 . 

35.131 THEORY I + 3 sem. hrv 

Harmony, including tonic, subdominant, and dominant chords. Sight-singing and 
keyboard harmonizations. Four hours per week. 

35.132 THEORY II + 3 sem hrv 

Continuation of Theory I, including stud\ of supertonic. submediant. and mediant 
chords, and common-chord and chromatic modulation. Melodic and harmonic dictation. 
right-ringing, and keyboard training. Four hours per ueek 
Prerequisite: 3 5.1 31 ■ 

35.141-148 STRINGS I-VII + 1 sem. hr. each course 

Private lessons tor students uith demonstrated ability or potential. 

35.151-158 ORGAN I-VII f 1 sem. hr. each course 

Private lessons tor those uho have previously studied organ or uho bavc strong 
piano backgrounds 

35.161-168 BRASS I-VI11 + 1 MM. hr. each course 

Private lessons in a brass instrument in which the student has demonstrated ability . 

35.171-177 VOICE I-VII + I sem. hr. each course 

Private lessons lor student uith demonstrated vocal ability. 

35.181-188 PIANO I-\ III + 1 sem. hr. each course 

Private lessons foi students who have had previoin piano ttud} 

3S.19MM WOODWINDS l-VIII I 1 sem. hr. each course 

Private lessons in an instrument in which the student has demonstrated abilitv 

35.208 spkivi ronCS IN MUSIC PERFORMANCE 3 sem. hrs. 

\ unique experience in performing Of the stud\ of performance practice. Instructor 

offering tins comae developa i one-time-only itudy. Information is available from the De- 
partment ol Music 



Mink ( !oi ksi s 131 

35.209 SPECIAL TOPICS IN MUSIC APPRECIATION + 3 wm. hrs. 

A unique study of music offering currently available topics. Instructor offering this 
course develops a one-time-only prospectus. Information is available from the Department 
of Music. 

35.221 MEDIEVAL AND RENAISSANCE MUSIC* f 3 sem. hrs. 

Emphasis on pre-Baroque; active listening; development of a technical vocabulary. 

Prerequisite: 35.101 or 102. 

35.222 MUSIC OF THE ROMANTIC ERA* t 3 sem. hrs. 

Nineteenth century European music; composers; relationship of music to the culture 
of the time 
Prerequisite: 35.101 or 35.102. 

35.223 AESTHETICS AND MUSIC CRITICISM* t 3 sem. hrs. 

Comparison of music objectives and philosophies of schools, eras, and individual 
composers. Principles of criticism that apply to music and its performance. 

35.224 CLASS PIANO I t 2 sem. hrs. 

Group piano instruction for the beginner. Emphasis on solo playing, creating accom- 
paniments, and sight reading. Three hours per week. 

35.225 CLASS PIANO II t 2 sem. hrs. 

Continuation of 35.242 for students of demonstrated ability. Developments of inde- 
pendence in solo playing and accompanying. Three hours per week. 

35.226 CLASS VOICE I t 2 sem. hrs. 

Group voice instruction for the beginner. Emphasis on fundamental singing tech- 
niques and solo performance. Three hours per week. 

35.231 THEORY III f 3 sem. hrs. 

Continuation of Theory II, including formal analysis, original compositions, and per- 
ception skills. Four hours per week. 
Prerequisite: 35.132 or permission of instructor. 

35.232 THEORY IV j 3 sem. hrs. 

Continuation of Theory, Twentieth century composition including analysis and com- 
position in melodic and harmonic idioms. Four hours per week. 
Prerequisite: 35.132 or permission of instructor. 

35.241-248 STRINGS MAJOR 2 credits each semester 

Two weekly half hour private lessons in strings for students majoring in the applied 
music specialization of the B.A. program. 

35.251-258 ORGAN MAJOR 2 credits each semester 

Two weekly half hour private lessons in organ for students majoring in the applied 
music specialization of the B.A. program. 

35.261-268 BRASS I-VIII 2 credits each semester 

Two weekly half hour private lessons in Brass for students majoring in the applied 
music specialization of the B.A. program. 

35.271-277 VOICE MAJOR I-VII 2 credits each semester 

Two weekly half hour private lessons in voice for students majoring in music in the 
B.A. program for the specialization of applied music. 



I sj s 

35.291-2MX WOODWIND MAJOR l-VIIl 2 credits each *emeMer 

Individual lessons on instruments of the woodwind famil\ for students majoring in 
music in the HA program and following specialization of applied music within that 

program. 

35.311 MUSIC IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 3 sem. hrs. 

Designed to provide prospective elementary school teachers with the skills, under- 
standing, and attitudes which will help them to function effectively in the area of music in 

the self -contained classroom. 

Prerequisite: funion and seniors only. 

35.315 MUSIC FOR THE EXCEPTIONAL CHILD 3 sem . hrv 

For teachers of children who deviate mentalK. physically, and emotionalK form the 
average. Emphasis on development of musical skills and understandings which help the 
teacher to function independently in the special classroom; an orientation to the musical 
experiences which further the general growth of exceptional children, and the development 
of organizational skills for effective learning. 

35.323 TWENTIETH CENTURY MUSIC* + 3 sem. hrv 

Compositions hy composers from Debussy to the present; listening and analysis of 

representative works. 
Prerequisite: 35.101 or 35.102. 

35.324 AMERICAN MUSIC* + 3 sem. hrv 
Analysis of works of selected American composers with reference to character 

indigenous to American music. 
Prerequisite: 35. 101 or 35. 102. 

35.325 OPERA AND MUSIC THEATRE* + 3 sem. hrv 

Great works of the lyric stage. Listening and readings concerning opera, operetta, 
and the popular theatre. 
Prerequisite: 35.101 or 35.102. 

35.326 MUSIC OF THE BAROQl E PERIOD* + 3 sem hrs. 

Important forms of the Baroque era as presented in the works ot Monteverdi. Bach. 
Handel. Vi\aldi and their contemporaries. 
Prerequisite 33 101 or 33.102. 

35.327 SI R\r\ Of TOPI I VR Ml M( * 3 sem. hrs. 
Analyst! of factors and elements of twentieth centur\ popular music. Chrooolof 

stud) includes jazz, balladry, spiritual. COUntry-wetteril, theatre, rock, and soul in compara- 
tive listening situations 

35 331 IHEOR1 V, COUNTERPOIN1 I seen. hrs. 

Dtinuation »'l rheory, including melodic Writing in two. three, and four \. 
I hree hours per week 

.it/site 33 132 or permission of instructor. 

ISJ32 rHEORY VI, ORCHESTRATION 2 sem. hrs. 

Dtinuation of rheory, including instrumental idioms, score writing, and analysis 
1 hree hours per week 

.usite 35.132 or permission ot instn, 

35.341 (NORM rECHNIQUES* 3 sem. hrs. 

Developmenl of techniques and ahilities tor participating in and supervising choral 
ensembles lone production, propel breathing, conducting, and appropriate literature. 



Ml 'SIC ('<>( KSI S 133 

35.350 SEMINAR IN MUSIC THEATRE 3 Mm. hrs. 

Study of the Broadway musical with special emphasis on works currently in produc- 
tion 

35.351 PIANO TEACHERS SEMINAR 3 sem. hrs. 

Repertoire, history, methods, and piano performance for keyboard teachers. 

35.352 SEMINAR IN VOCAL LITERATURE AND TECHNIQUES 3 sem. hrs. 

A study of the physical mechanics of the singing voice for experienced vocalists. 
Vocal literature and the psychology of singing also presented. 

35.421 EIGHTEENTH CENTURY MUSIC* t 3 sem. hrs. 

Symphony, sonata, and chamber music from the Classical period with emphasis on 
the sonata form of the late 18th century. Key schemes, thematic development, and harmonic 
vocabulary. 
Prerequisite: 35.101 or 102; 131, 132. 

35.441 PERFORMANCE SEMINAR 1 sem. hr. 

Seminar for music majors electing the performance specialization. Performance 
practices, stage decorum, accompanying, and repertoire. 

35.491 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN MUSIC 1-3 sem. hrs. 

Student project of a creative nature in music history, education, or performance. 

[see section 7.5] 

35.497 INTERNSHIPS IN MUSIC 3-15 sem. hrs. 

Off-campus program to be arranged by student-faculty advisor and an off-campus 
agency. Consent of the Department of Music prior to registration is required. 




134 Philosophy ind Anthropology Courses 

PHILOSOPHY and ANTHROPOLOGY 

FACULTY 

Professor Richard .1 Brook. William I ( arlough (Chairperson); \ 

Marjorie Gay, Oliver J. Larmi, Robert Reeder, Seymour Schuimmer. Robert Solenberger; 

•ant Professor Da\i(J Mmderhout. 

PHILOSOPHY: 

Arts and Sciences Major for the B.A. degree: 

Philosophy 28.212, 28.310, 28.312 
Philosophy 28.314 or 28.315; 
18 semester hours electi\c. 



COURSE DESCRIPTI()\S 
(Code 28) 

Courses marked + may be used toward General Education. 

28.211 INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY + 3 sem hrs. 

Reflective inquiry into selected problems of general philosophic interest. Some o\ the 
problems considered are types of knowledge, nature of reality, individual and social values, 
and existence of God. 

28.212 LOGIC + 3 sem. hrs. 

Methods and principles of reasoning with applications to contemporary debates In- 
formal fallacies; the syllogism; predicate calculus; quantification; and induction. 

28.220 ETHICS + 3 sem. hrs. 

Analysis of prominent theories: ethical relativism, hedonism, utilitarianism, duties. 
rights, justice; meaning and use of terms. 

28.230 RELIGIONS OF THE EAST 3 sem. hrs. 

Examination of religious beliefs from primitive stages to the developed System 

Hinduism, Buddhism. Confucianism. Maoism and Shinto. Emphasis on beliefs, traditions, 
and practices rather than historical data 

28.231 THE \\ ESTERN RELIGIOUS TRADITION 3 sem hrs 

Examination o! the tour great monotheisms, /oroastriamsm. Judaism, Christianity . 
and Islam. Inquiry into the original literature as well as the evolving theologies Modern 
issues within these religious traditions. 

28.290 MEDIC A I KIHK S 3 SMB. hrs. 

Investigation ot moral issues thai arise in such medical contexts as human experi- 
mentation, death and dying, medical care and its distribution, genetic engineering, and 
definition Of health and illness 

28.2s»: CONTEMPORARY MORAL PROBLEMS 3 sem. hrs. 

Investigation into some ol the major contemporary (and perennial) moral prob I 

abortion and the rights ol the tetus. pornograpln and its control; crime and its punishment; 

obedience to laus. discrimination based on race And sex. decision-making procedures; social 
justice; drugs, suicide and euthanasia, treedom and its limits. 

28.303 PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENC1 3 sem. hrs. 

Analysis ol logic and inquir) in the natural and social sciences; the nature of scien- 
tific explanation, problems ot causality, measurement, prediction, and verification. 



Philosophy ind Anthropology Courses 135 

28.304 PHILOSOPHY OF THE SOCIAL SCIENCES J 3 sem. hrs. 

Examination of conceptual problems in the social science disciplines, including ob- 
jectivity, classification, explanation, nature of laws and reductionism. 

28.306 PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION + 3 sem. hrs. 

Critical analysis of the origins and nature of religious faith. Attention given to types 
of religion, evidence supporting religious belief, and problems in and challenges to religion. 



28.308 PHILOSOPHY OF HISTORY 3 sem. hrs. 

Philosophic issues of interest to the working historian, e.g., historical objectivity, his- 
torical explanation, history and the physical sciences, and the role of values in historical 
writing. The role of speculative philosophies of history in the writing of history. 
Prerequisite: 3 semester hours of philosophy or 9 semester hours of story. 

28.310 HISTORY OF ANCIENT PHILOSOPHY f 3 sem. hrs. 

A study of the origins of Western Philosophy in Ancient Greece. Plato's philo- 
sophical writings are examined in light of pre-Socratic speculation on the one hand and in 
terms of Aristotle's criticisms and developments on the other. 

28.312 HISTORY OF MODERN PHILOSOPHY + 3 sem. hrs. 

Examination of the beginnings of modern philosophy in the writings of 17th century 
Rationalists, 18th century Empiricists, and Kant. Topics include knowledge and skepticism, 
theory of abstractionism, mind-body problem, and problem of personal identity. 

28.314 EXISTENTIALISM AND PHENOMENOLOGY + 3 sem. hrs. 

Consideration of writings of such men as Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Husserl, Sartre, 
and Tillich. Major themes include human subjectivity, human freedom, alienation and 
meaning. 

28.315 CONTEMPORARY ANALYTIC PHILOSOPHY t 3 sem. hrs. 

Examination of a 20th century philosophical movement concerned with logical 
analysis. Emphasis on analysts' reconstruction of the relation between language and 
philosophy, particularly theory of knowledge, ethics and religion. 

28.350 ENVIRONMENTAL PHILOSOPHY + 3 sem. hrs. 

Survey of attitudes towards nature, man's relationship to it, the role of technology, 
and discussion of the ethical dimensions of the environmental crisis. 



28.351 THEORY OF KNOWLEDGE f 3 sem. hrs. 

Inquiry into the problem of knowledge, certainty and skepticism. Theory of percep- 
tion; concepts of meaning and truth. 



28.470 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN PHILOSOPHY 3 or 6 sem. hrs. 

Individual study of a particular philosophical problem under the guidance of the 
staff. Emphasis upon independent research on topics selected by student and faculty. The 
course may be taken twice. 
Prerequisite: 6 semester hours of philosophy. 

[see section 7.5] 

28.471 SEMINAR 3 sem. hrs. 



taUNorm vm> tornuorouxn ( a m 

SOCIOLOGY INTHROFOLOG1 

Vrts and Sciences major for the B.A. degree: 

Anthropologv 46.100. 200; Sc)ciol()g> 45 462 or 470; 45 460 or Psychology 48.260; 
Biology 50 101 or 50.210; 12 scm. hrs. selected from 43.213, 332. 466, 46.4/r 

490. 50.333. or other courses as recommended by the advisor and approved 
by the department chairperson 



COURSE DESCRIPTIOSS 

(Code 46) 

46.100 GENERAL ANTHROPOLOGY + 3 sem. hrs. 

The study of the emergence and development of man, the biological basis of human 
culture and society, and the origins of the social units of fossil man. 

46.200 PRINCIPLES OF CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY + 3 sem. hrs. 

Man's bio-cultural development and cultural achievement. The function of elements 
and configurations of material and non-material culture in meeting human needs. Cultural 
processes are the role of culture in personality formation. 

46.301 FIELD ARCHAEOLOGY I 3 sem. hrs. 

Field investigation of various aboriginal cultures which have occupied the valley of 
the North Branch of the Susquehanna River since the glacial age. Emphasis on excavation 
of sites in this area, preceded by orientation to stratigraphic and recording techniques. 

46.302 FIELD ARCHAEOLOGY II 3 sem hrs. 

Intensive study of problems encountered in archaeological research of prehistoric cul- 
tures, as revealed by excavation and comparative study of finds. 

46.320 CONTEMPORARY WORLD CULTURES 3 sem. hrs. 

Comparative analysis of selected non-European societies in contrasting cultural and 
natural areas. Stresses on the natural and social environment, national character, religion 
and world view, and literary, artistic, and musical expression. 

46.330 PEOPLES Of SI i-SAH \K \N U Rl( \ 3 sem. hrs. 

Survey of cultures o! Africa south o\ the Sahara Topics include African langu. 

prehistory art. marriage and the family, political and religious organization, impact o\ 
urbanization on social structure. 

4fJ31 PERSONALITY IND CULTURE 3 sem. hrs. 

I \ammation o\ cultural influences on the development of personalis, MttrjFM 
• aluv difference! in various cultures, explanatory hypothu 

40.340 NORTH AMERICAN INDIANS 3scm.hr,. 

Survcv of the native cultures o\ North America in prehistoric and early historic 
periods Includes Indians and archcaologv of Pennsylvania 

46 40*; PRIMATES 3 mm. in. 

I he studv of the various phenomena, affecting primate behavior ecol life. 

and socio-cultural adaption, with emphasis on the development of socio-biological trai> 
lating to human origins 

100 and 50.210. 



Philosophy \m> Anthropology Courses 137 

46.410 PRIMITIVE ARTS 3 sem. hrs. 
Graphic arts, literature, musie, and the dance of ancient and non-European cultures. 

46.411 COMPARATIVE RURAl -URBAN SYSTEMS 3 sem. hrs. 

A cross-cultural analysis of rural-urhan interaction. The course looks into the rise of 
cities as well as into traditional and modern trends in urbanization in order to discover 
general principles about rural-urban relations. Among the topics to be discussed are rural- 
urban economic patterns, political and social class structure, and comparative social organi- 
zation in contiguous rural and urban communities. At least one non-Western rural-urban 
system is discussed in detail. 

46.430 CULTURES AND PEOPLES OF OCEANIA 3 sem. hrs. 

Review of the types of aboriginal culture and the distribution of languages and 
physical types in the Pacific-Island world; archaeological evidence and migration routes 
from Malaysia to Melanesia and Polynesia. 

46.440 LANGUAGE AND CULTURE 3 sem. hrs. 

A study of the place or oral and non-oral language in human evolution and contem- 
porary cultures. Topics discussed include dialectal variation, discourse analysis, multi- 
lingualism, language and cognition, and the role of language in education. 

45.450 PEOPLES OF CULTURES OF 

SOUTH AMERICA 3 sem. hrs. 

A survey introduction to the aboriginal, non-literature cultures of South America, 
including the ecological background, archaeology, and cultural patterns. 

46.466 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN 

ANTHROPOLOGY 1-6 sem. hrs. 

Independent Study by a student with faculty guidance of a particular research pro- 
blem in Anthropology. The research problem will either extend current course content or 
deal with an area not covered in the current course offerings in anthropology. The problem 
to be researched will be chosen by the faculty member and the student working together. 

[see section 7.5] 

46.470 HISTORY OF ANTHROPOLOGICAL 

THOUGHT AND THEORY 3 sem. hrs. 

This course surveys intensively the leading methods and theories of anthropological 
and ethnological interpretation, with special emphasis on the concept of culture and its 
practical application to modern problems. 

46.480 RELIGION AND MAGIC 3 sem. hrs. 

A comparative analysis of the origins, elements, forms and symbolism of religious 
beliefs and behavior; the role of religion in society with particular reference to nonliterate 
societies. Anthropological theories and methods of religion, both historical and contempo- 
rary. 

46.481 CULTURAL DYNAMICS 3 sem. hrs. 

Anthropology examines the modern world with emphasis on emerging new patterns 
of western and international culture. Study of the impact of mass society and technology on 
the animal, man, and prospects for the future. 

46.490 SOCIALIZATION OF THE CHILD 3 sem. hrs. 

Life experience and adjustment of the individual through infancy, middle childhood 
and youth. Contrasting methods of introducing children to adult economic, social and re- 
ligious activities. 



I M Phi jh i Coutsa 

PHYSICS 

FACULTY 

ProfetSOn l>a\id A. Superdock (Chairperson). Halbcrt \ Gates, I>a\ id J Harp-. 

1 Scaipino, M dene Ia\lor. Associate ProfesSOn P Joseph G -phen G. 

Wukovhz; Assistant Professor Russell B DeVore 

PHYSICS: 

Vrts and Sciences major for the B.A. degree: 

Chemistr\ 52.102, 113: Mathematics 53.125, 126, 225, 271, 322; Physki 54 211. 212, 

310. 311. 314. 400; 12 semester hours chosen from other Phyi n numbered 

above 300. 

\ris and Sciences major for the B.S. degree: 

Chemistry 52.102, 113: Mathematics 53.125, 126. 225. 271. 322: 3 semester hours 
chosen from. Mathematics 53.212, 226, 373; Physics 54.211. 212. 310. 311. 314. 
400. 450; 15 semester hours chosen from other Physics courses numbered above 
300. 

Note: Requirements for the major for the B.S. in Ed. degree are found in the section 
on Secondary Education. School of Professional Studies. 

COURSE DESCRIPTIOSS 
(Code 54) 

Courses marked + may be used toward General Education. 

54.101 BASIC PHYSICAL SCIENCE + 3 sem. hrv 

An introductory integration of concepts and principles from chemistry, physics, and 
astronomy, with consideration for the nature of the scientific thought and of the interaction 
of science with human and community concerns. For non-scientists. 

54.103 PRINCIPLES OF PHYSICAL SCIENCE + 3 sem. hrs. 

An integrated physical science course emphasizing laboratory experience. Especially 
recommended for elementary teachers Encourages the development oi mental models to 
correspond with experience. Atoms, molecules, materials, and chemical change; energy; light 
and electricity. 4 hours lab-discussion Week. 

54.104 PRINCIPLES OF PHYSK VI S(IrN(r II + 3 sem. hrs. 
\ continuation of 54.103 Astronomy, atomic theor>. geology, cr\ stallograph>, and 

chemical bonding. 4 hours lab-discussion week 
Prerequisite: 54.103 or consent of instruct 

54.105 ENERGY: SOURCES AND ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS 3 sem. hrs 

I he course is | primer in the problems of energ\ sources, utilization, and environ- 
mental eltccts in a technological Society. It will include I revien Oi circumstances leading to 
the present crises and | lUTVe) ol the major sources of energ\ (fossil and nuclear) including 
reserves. Utilization, and production ot electricity. Supplemental sources such as 
hydroelectric, uind. solar, isothermal and others uill also be reviewed in terms of their 
technological state and promise tor the future. 

54.107 4PMJED PHYSK S FOR HEALTH s( IKN( is 4 sem. hrs. 

Selected principles of physics with applications to the processes and instrumentation 
of medical technolog\ Mechanics, fluids, kinetic energy and heal, optics, electricity, and 
magnetism, electronics, atomic structure, radiation, and data acquisition and readout. 3 
hours class, 3 hours laboratory per week. 



Pin sii s Coi rsi s i w 

54.111 INTRODUCTORY PHYSICS I | 4 sem. hrs. 
An intuitive approach to selected topics presented lor the student not intending to 

Specialize in physics or chemistry. Mechanics, heat, kinetic molecular theory ol gases, wave 
motion, and sound. 3 class, 3 laboratory week. 

54.112 INTRODITTORY PHYSICS II J 4 sem. hrs. 

A continuation of 54.111. Electricity, magnetism, light, relativity, quantum and 
atomic theory, structure of matter, and nuclear and particle physics. 3 class, 3 laboratory/ 
week. 
Prerequisite: 54.111 or consent of instructor. 

54.211 GENERAL PHYSICS I + 4 sem. hrs. 

An introductory treatment using calculus; appropriate for physical science or 
mathematics majors. Mechanics, the physics of fluids, kinetic theory, heat, and thermody- 
namics. 3 class, 3 laboratory/week. 
Prerequisite: Math 53. 125 or concurrent registration. 

54.212 GENERAL PHYSICS II f 4 sem. hrs. 

A continuation of 54.21 1. Wave motion, sound, geometrical and physical optics, elec- 
tricity, and magnetism. 3 class, 3 laboratory/ week. 

Prerequisite: Math 53.126 or concurrent registration; Phys 54.211, or 54.111 with consent of 
instructor. 

54.225 DEMONSTRATIONS IN THE PHYSICAL SCIENCES 3 sem. hrs. 

Theory, design, and presentation of demonstration experiments for the teaching of 
the physical sciences, including some attention to specialized audio-visual media. Special 
consideration of apparatus for new curricula such as PSSC, CHEM Study, HPP, ESCP, 
and IPS. 2 class, 2 laboratory/ week. 
Prerequisite: Phys 54.112; Chem. 52.102, 113; or their equivalent. 

54.304 NUCLEAR RADIATIONS 2 sem. hrs. 

A laboratory-oriented course dealing primarily with basic techniques for detecting, 
measuring, and analyzing nuclear radiations. Applications of nuclear radiations in science 
and technology. Aspects of radiation safety and radiation pollution of the environment. 1 
class, 3 laboratory/ week. 
Prerequisite: 54.112 or 212 or consent of instructor. 

54.310 MODERN ATOMIC PHYSICS f 3 sem. hrs. 

Introduction to the concepts of quantum theory, wave mechanics, and relativity in 
atomic and nuclear physics. 
Prerequisite: Phy 54.212, or 54.112 with consent of instructor. 

54.311 MECHANICS 3 sem. hrs. 

Statics and dynamics of single particles and particle systems. Motion of a rigid body. 
Prerequisite: 54.212, or 54.112 with consent of instructor; Math 53.225 or consent of 
instructor. 

54.314 ELECTRICITY AND MAGNETISM 3 sem. hrs. 

Electric and magnetic fields, potential, dielectric properties, electric circuits, elec- 
tromagnetic induction, and magnetic properties of matter, with a brief introduction to elec- 
tromagnetic waves. 
Prerequisite: Phy 54.212, or 54.112 with consent of instructor; Math 53.225. 

54.315 ELECTRONICS + 4 sem. hrs. 

Theory and application of semiconductors and vacuum tubes with special emphasis 
on circuitry. Study of basic electronic instrumentation as related to the gathering, process- 
ing, and display of scientific data in any discipline. 3 class, 3 laboratory/ week. 
Prerequisite: 54.112 or 54.212. 



141) PHYSU ! Cm ksis 

54.318 OPTICS Wm. hrv 

A combination of geometrical optics including lens theor> with phvsical (u 
optics including detraction, interference, polarization, lasers, and coherent light. 

Prerequisite: 54.212 or 54.1 12 with consent of instructor. 

54.400 \I)\ \N( ED PHYSK S LABORATORY 4 contract hrs, 2 credit hrv 

The course will deal with the basic tenets ol lab work in physics, involving considera- 
tions ol experimental error, proper research and preparation for an experiment, and experi- 
mental design. Experiments primarily from the areas of atomic physics, electricity and 
magnetism, and optics will be performed. I class, 3 laboratory week. 
Prerequisite: Phvs 54.310, 54.314. 

54.421 SOLID STATE PHYSICS 3 sem. hrs. 

Physical properties of matter in the solid state. Basic quantum concepts, crvstal 
structure, electrons in metals, electrical conductivity, semi-conductors, band theory, and the 
p-n junction. Dielectric and magnetic properties of matter. 
Prerequisites: Phys 54.314. 54.310; Math 53.322. 

54.422 THERMODYNAMICS 3 sem. hrs. 

Concepts and principles of classical thermodynamics. Thermodynamics of simple 
systems. Introduction to kinetic theory and statistical thermodynamics. 
Prerequisites: Phys 54.212 or 54.112 with consent of instructor; Math 53.225. 

54.450 INTRODUCTION TO QUANTUM MECHANICS 3 sem. hrs 

An introduction to the fundamentals of quantum and wave mechanics beginning 
with a review of quantum radiation theory and proceeding through the Schroedinger 
presentation. Treatment includes one dimensional potential function, the harmonic oscilla- 
tor, and the hydrogen atom. 
Prerequisites: Physics 54-31 1 . 314; Mathematics 53-332. 

54.480 HISTORY OF PHYSICAL SCIENCE 3 sem hrs 

An account of the development of physical science from the time o\ Copernicus to 
the present with attention to the nature of scientific investigation, assumptions, constructs 
and models, and the interaction of science with other thinking. 
Prerequisite: Phys 54.112; Cheni 52.102; or their equivalent. 

54.490 SEMINAR IN PHYSK S 1 sem. hr. 

54.491 INDEPENDENT Ml Dl IN PHYSU S 1-3 sem. hrs. 

\n investigation oi an area o! special interest and value to the student, under the di- 
rection ol | faculty member, and following I plan approved in advance bv the department 
chairman. Mav he partly interdisciplinary and may involve limited experimental work. 

[sec section 7.5] 

54.493 INDEPENDENT RESEARCH 1-3 sem. hrs. 

An application Ol theoretical and 01 experimental research methods to a special pro- 
blem and the preparation Ol I report Mav be interdisciplinarv \ plan acceptable to the 
student and to supervising tacultv member must be approved in advance bv the department 
chairperson 



Pol UK \i Si ii \< I COI USES 141 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 

FACULTY: 

Professors Robert I , Rosholt (Chairperson). Charles (i. Jackson; Associate Professors 
Martin M. Gildea, Prakash C. Kapil, .lames W. Percey; Assistant Professor 

Richard L. Micheri. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE: 

Arts and Sciences major for the B.A. degree: 

Potal hours 30 semester hours; 

Required courses 12 semester hours including: 

Elements of Political Science (101) 

United States Government (161); 

One course from the theory and methodology group: 
108, 405, 409, or 412 

One course from the comparative government international relations group: 171, 
181, 366, 371. 372, 373, 383, 463, 464, 465, or 487 

Only one 100-level course may be used to fulfill the theory/ methodology (108) or 
the comparative government/international relations (171, 181) requirements. 
Political Science electives — 18 semester hours; 
Additional restrictions — no more than 12 semester hours of 100-level course work 

may be included in the 30 semester hour total. Up to 6 semester hours of the 30 

semester hour total may be taken in cognate disciplines with the approval of the 

departmental advisor. 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

(Code 44) 

+ May be used toward the General Education requirements. 

44.101 ELEMENTS OF POLITICAL SCIENCE t 3 sem. hrs. 

An introduction to the nature, scope, approaches, and methodology of political 
science by means of an overview of political and governmental institutions, processes, 
theories and problems. 

44.108 CONTEMPORARY POLITICAL IDEOLOGIES t 3 sem. hrs. 

An introduction to political ideas shaping the contemporary world: nationalism, 
liberalism, conservatism, anarchism, totalitarianism, capitalism, socialism, communism. 

44.110 LEARNING POLITICS THROUGH SCIENCE FICTION ] 3 sem. hrs. 

Using science fiction novels, films and short stories to teach an introductory course 
dealing with continuing political concepts and problems in the discipline. 

44.161 UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT ] 3 sem. hrs. 

An introduction to government and politics in the United States emphasizing consti- 
tutional development, political decision-making institutions and processes, and contempo- 
rary problems such as dissent, conflict, civil rights, and foreign policy. 

44.171 COMPARING STATES AND NATIONS | 3 sem. hrs. 

An introduction to the procedures of comparative government with emphasis on re- 
search methodologies and interpretation of research results. This course will be world wide 
rather than regional in scope. 

44.181 CONTEMPORARY ISSUES IN WORLD POLITICS t 3 sem. hrs. 

An introduction to international politics through an examination of such critical pro- 
blems as war and peace, East-West relations, nuclear disarmament, nation-building, and 
revolution. 



KSIS 

44 MM POLITICS AND THI VKI^ 3 sem. hrv 

\ survcv ol painting, music, films, poetrv and novels, with emphasis on now 
show the relationships between these media and political concepts. philosophv and prob- 
lems 

44.322 POl UK M VIOl EN< I m. hrv 

A survey ot individual, group, and mass political violence, concentrating on 61 
and manifestations Positive and negative ettectiveness of political violence with the object 
ol placing the phenomena in meaningful historical and contemporary cor. - 

44.323 POLITICS AND PS^ ( HOLOGY 3 sem. hrv 

I his course seeks to describe, explain and analyze topics in personality and social 
psychology that seem relevant in understanding political behavior It seeks to explore the 
question: "What are the relationships between a man's personality, his psychological make- 
up and the way he hehaves politically'.'" Moreover, it will try to show students how to think 
about psychology and politics, what kinds of evidence to gather and how to gather that evi- 
dence in a scientific wav 

44.324 POLITICAL SOCIALIZATION 3 Km hrs. 

The process of socialization to political attitudes, values, and behaviors through so- 
cializing agents such as the family, elementary and secondary schools, peer groups, work 
groups, and the mass media studied in light of political, psychological and sociological con- 
cepts. 

44.326 PARTIES, GROl PS AND PIBLIC OPINION 3 sem hrv 

The development of political parties in the United States; elections, voter behavior, 
and political participation; the role of interest groups; political propaganda. 

44.331 LEGAL AND POLITICAL ASPECTS OF BUSINESS 3 sem hrs 

This course is designed to examine and analyze the extensive and significant role that 
government and politics play in the husiness world as promoter, regulator, buver and 
manager o\ business. The impact of political processes and governmental policies on the 
economic sector will be studied in an historical and contemporary perspective, using 
ideological, constitutional, statutory, adjudicative and behavioral analysis. 

44 336 PI BLIC ADMINISTRATION THEORY 3 sem hrv 

Administrative and organizational theory with an emphasis on structural-functional 
analysis, bureaucratic behavior; current developments. 

44.351 STATE CO\ ERNMEN I \ND POl UK S 3 sem. hrs. 

I S federalism; state constitutions; the organization and operation oi state lec- 
tures, executives, and judiciaries; party and group politics at the state level; current p 
lems 

44.36ft POLITICAL SYSTEMS— EUROPI 3 sem. hrs. 

Politics and government in selected states including (ireat Britain. France. Weil 
Germany, and the Soviet Union; principles o\ comparative ana 

44.371 POl I IK VI SYSTEMS— AFRH \ 3 sem. hrs. 

Problems ot newly independent states, the struggle for independence and attempt 
create national unity in the lace ot tribalism, economic and political development. 

44.372 GOVERNMEN1 tND POLITICS OF THE MIDDLE EAST 3 sem. hrs 

I his is a three credit course that seeks to present and analyze the politics oi the Mid- 
dle East as a coherent system ol particular states I he course also will focus on the conflict 
betvsecn the Arabs and the Israelis and the international implications o\ the conflict 



P()l MM \l S( II \< I COl KM S 143 

44.373 GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS IN CHINA AND INDIA f 3 sem. hrs. 

Politics and government in selected states with an emphasis on the forces which 
shape domestic and foreign politics and processes. 

44.383 INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS 3 sem. hrs. 

Sources of international conflict and cooperation; power politics in the international 
arena; problems of collective security and the settlement of disputes. 

44.405 THE DEVELOPMENT OF POLITICAL THOUGHT 3 sem. hrs. 

Selected political theorists from Plato to Nietzsche are compared with contemporary 
political theorists in an attempt to build bridges between traditional and contemporary 
theories and theorists. Included are: Plato and Strauss, Thucydides and Max Weber, Aris- 
totle and Lipset, Augustine and Morgenthau, Machiavelli and Neustadt, Rousseau and 
Dewey, Aquinas and Maritain, Hobbes and Riker, Burke and Lippmann, Marx and C. 
Wright Mills, and John Stuart Mill and Christian Bay. 

44.409 AMERICAN POLITICAL THOUGHT 3 sem. hrs. 

An analysis of the relationship of American political thought to contemporary 
political science by using traditional materials in a historical, chronological way but rework- 
ing them to show their relation and relevance to actions and institutions. Included are the 
main ideas of the leading political thinkers in America from the Colonial period to the 
present. 

44.412 SCOPE, APPROACHES AND METHODS 

OF POLITICAL SCIENCE 3 sem. hrs. 

This course seeks to explain and analyze the various approaches and methods cur- 
rently in use in political science as well as to indicate the range and develop the logic of that 
discipline. Specifically it studies: the scope and nature of political science; the meaning and 
nature of facts, concepts and constructive "laws", explanation, and theory, the problem of 
values in political science; various approaches such as functionalism, systems' theory, power 
theories, groups and roles, etc., and methods of research. 

44.429 RACISM AND SEXISM IN AMERICAN POLITICS 3 sem. hrs. 

A study of the role of blacks and women in American politics. The course will trace 
briefly the historical background leading to their position today. It will relate these prob- 
lems to each of the three branches of government, political parties, and pressure groups. 

44.437 PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION APPLICATIONS 3 sem. hrs. 

An analysis of the methods and techniques in the application of administrative and 
organizational theory to the operations of governmental bureaucracies. Topics covered in- 
clude: Planning-Program Budgeting Systems (PPBS), Program Evaluation Review Tech- 
nique (PERT), and Operations Research (OR). 

44.438 CIVIL SERVICE EMPLOYMENT POLICIES AND PRACTICES 3 sem. hrs. 

For political science majors and others interested in public service. Employment pat- 
terns of government, structure and function of personnel systems, and problems en- 
countered in the public service. 

44.440 THE PRESIDENT AND CONGRESS 3 sem. hrs. 

Presidential and congressional politics. Public policy-making roles. Executive-legisla- 
tive relationships. Constitutional issues. Problem area and proposals for reform. 

44.446 CONSTITUTIONAL LAW I 3 sem. hrs. 

An analysis of the evolution, structure and function of the Supreme Court, 
concentrating on a case study approach of the Court's interpretations of the commerce and 
taxing powers and federal-state relationships. 



144 P<>| I l l< \l S( 11 \< l (ni Ksis 

44447 CONSTITUTIONAL LAW II 3 sem. hrv 

\ study of the decisions ol the Supreme Court as thev arc related to the individual 
and the government concentrating on: nationalization of the Bill of Rights, rights of per- 
accused of crimes; equal protection and voting rights. 

44.448 THE JUDICIAL PRO( f ss 3 sem. hrv 

Judicial policy making is studied through systems theory, group theory, and judicial 
attitude and behavior 

44.453 L(>( VI (,()\ BRNMENT AND POLITICS 3 sem. hrv 

An analvsis of the structure and function of local governments, local politics, local 
decision making, community power, urbanization trends, metropolitan politics, national- 
local and state-local relations. 

44.456 PUBLIC POLICY 3 sem. hrv 

It will cover all aspects of public policy including those related to the environment It 
will include formation and adoption, implementation, impact and outcome, and evaluation 
and analysis 

44.457 POLITICAL ECONOMY 3 sem. hrv 
A course designed primarily for political science majors dealing with political 

markets, currency and resource floor exchange, bargaining, inflation and deflation, and 
resource accumulation. 

44 .458 IS. FOREIGN POLICY 3 sem. hrv 

An analysis of the substance, methods, and purposes of U.S. foreign policy including 
the determinants of our foreign policy, policy making machinery the implementation of our 
foreign policy, and contemporary foreign policy problems. 

44.463 THE I .s.s.R. POLITICAL SYSTEM 3 sem. hrv 

The governmental process in the I S.S.R. ; the role o\~ the Communist Partv; the 
evolving ideologv from Marx to the present; Soviet bloc politics 

44 464 (,()\ LRNMK.N I VM) POLITICS OF IRELAND I + 3 sem hrv 

A survev o\ historic, social, cultural, and religious developments in Ireland, with 
concentration on a studv o\ the government and politics oi Northern Ireland and the Irish 
Republic Contemporarv literature, drama, music, and art 

44.465 GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS OF IRELAND D t 3 sem. hrv 

\ Study-tOUf ol Northern Ireland and the Irish Republic including visits to museums, 
galleries, theaters, and historic sites and meetings with governmental and political leaders 
Approximate!) hall ol the time is spent in Dublin, the remainder on a bus trip through the 
Republic and Northern Ireland 

44.487 INTERNATIONAI I \ nn vnd ORGANIZATIONS m. hrv 

I he theoretical and practical implications ol the legal and organizational effort! 
regulate inter-nation relations with emphasis on international law. the United Nations, the 
International Court ol Justice, and regional and functional organizations 

44.4s>o INDEPENDENT STUDY IN POLITICAL SCIENCI M sem. hrv 

Designed primaril) fot individualized reading, icsearch, and reporting under condi- 
tions for minimal supervision. Pro j ect s must have departmental approval and be under 
bv the end ol the first week ol a term 

[see section 7S\ 

44.491 READINGS IN GOVERNMENT iND POLITICS 3 sem. hrv 

Topics are selected on the basis ol close consultations between instructor and 
student Designed for cither group or individual studv 



PSY< HOI OCN ( "«»i RSES 145 

44.492 SEMINAR IN GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS 3 st-m. hrs. 

Selected problems in government and politics are studied in an attempt to review and 

unify theories and methods of political science. Individual research projects are emphasi/cd. 

44.496 FIELD EXPERIENCE IN POLITICAL SCIENCE 1-6 sem. hrs. 

Supervised individual or group activities, including interns+iips of a non-classroom 
variety in applied areas of political science. 

PSYCHOLOGY 

FACULTY: 

Professors Michael W. Gaynor, Martin A. Satz, J. Calvin Walker; Associate Professors 
John S. Baird (Chairperson), Donald R. Bashore, Donald A. Camplese, Steven L. Cohen, 
Robert B. Hessert, L. Richard Larcom, Constance J. Schick; Assistant Professors Norman 
G. Kruedelbach, Michael M. Levine, Alex Poplawsky. 

PSYCHOLOGY: 

Arts and Sciences major for B.A. degree: 

Psychology 48.101, 260, 261, and 401 plus 18 semester hours elective in psychology 
with one course in each of four categories, defined by the department, for a 
minimum of 31 hours. 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 
(Code 48) 

48.101 GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY + 3 sem. hrs. 

Psychology is viewed as a system of scientific inquiry into the nature and behavior of 
man. Major concepts, principles and processes concerned with man's functioning as an indi- 
vidual and as a social being. 

48.210 LIFE-SPAN PSYCHOLOGY 3 sem. hrs. 

The psychology of human development from conception to death. Traditional topics 
and issues in developmental psychology such as cognition and personality will be treated 
but within a life-span developmental perspective. 

48.211 CHILD PSYCHOLOGY + 3 sem. hrs. 

A study of normal development and the interrelationships among various aspects of 
biological, cognitive, personality and social factors. Emphasis on prenatal to adolescent 
development. 
Prerequisite: 48.101. 

48.231 PSYCHOLOGY OF ADJUSTMENT + 3 sem. hrs. 

Personal and social meaning of adjustment. An operational approach to mental 
health is taken, including such concepts as anxiety, frustration, conflict, aggression and 
defense. 

48.251 SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY + 3 sem. hrs. 

The study of interpersonal behavior-how individuals affect and are affected by 
others-with emphasis on affiliation, interpersonal perception and attraction, group behavior 
and conformity, attitude change and compliance. 
Prerequisite: 48.101. 

48.260 BASIC STATISTICS + 3 sem. hrs. 

An introduction to fundamental statistical concepts and principles, providing a foun- 
dation for research methodology for students who need not be mathematically inclined. 
Computation, interpretation, and application of commonly used descriptive, correlation, 
and inferential statistical procedures for analyzing data. 



146 \\\ < HOI 0G1 ( '" Ksis 

4X261 EXPUUMENtAl PSYCHOLOGY 4 sem. hrs. 

Survcv ol psychologv as a laboratorv science, concepts, methodology, techniques and 

ii ol study. LaboiBtory period provide! practical experienc hours. 3 tabonttof) 

flours 

Prerequisite: 48.101 and 48.260. 

48.271 EDI CATIONAL PSY< HOLOGY + 3 sem. hrs. 

Principles ol psychologv as applied to the classroom. Fmphasis is upon learning 
processes as affected by environmental, experiential, and developmental fa, 
Prerequisite: 48.101. 

48.311 ADILTHOOD AND AGING 3 sem. hrv 

A study of development of adults in our culture. Topics include the effects of the 
social environment on aging, special problems of aging, sex differences during adulthood, 
vocational, marital and familiar development, and the psychology of death and dying. Em- 
phasis is placed on human behavior between young adulthood and senescence with 
particular emphasis on the aging process. 
Prerequisite: 48.101. 

48.321 PSYCHOLOGICAL TESTS AND MEASUREMENTS 3 sem hrs. 

An introduction to the logic of psychological measurement, emphasizing the applied 
and practical aspects of psychological testing through classroom exercises in administering, 
scoring, and interpreting test results. Provides student with background for test evaluation. 
Prerequisite: 48.101. 

48 335 ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY 3 strn. hrs 

A survey of classification, psychodynamics. treatment and prognosis o\ mental 
disorders. Emphasis is placed on the characteristics of these disorders, their etiology, and 
various approaches to treatment and remediation. 
Prerequisite: 48.101. 

48.353 INDUSTRIAL PSYCHOLOGY 3 sem. hrs. 

A study ot behavior principles, techniques of investigation and methods of evaluating 
possible solutions to human relations problems such as morale, leadership, productivity, se- 
lection, placement, training, job design, motivation, fatigue, job satisfaction and organiza- 
tional structure and functions, found m industrv and government. 

Pre r eq u isite: 48.101. 

48.356 PSYCHOLOGY Of MOTH UIO\ 3 sem. hrs. 

A survcv ot the fundamental determinants ot human and animal activity. Theories, 
research methodologies, and experimental evidence related to the activation and direction o\ 
behavior 
Prerequisite: 48.101, 48.260, 48.261 <>r consent of instructor. 

48.375 PSYCHOLOGY OF LEARNING 3 sem. hrs. 

Ihcorctical and experimental bases ot learning in animal and human behavior. Situa- 
tional and drive factors attccting learning, stimulus generalization and discrimination, reten- 
tion, and tor get ting 

Prereq u isite: 48.101, • 261, or consent of Instructor. 

48.376 PRINCIPLES OF BEHAVIOR MODIFICATION 3 sem. hrs. 

The application ot learning principles to change behavior in both individual and 
group settings 
Prerequisite: A credits m psychology. 



\\\ ( HOI ()(.N ( Ol KM S 147 

48.380 PHYSIOLOGICAL PSYCHOLOGY 3 sem. hrs. 

A study of the relationship hetween psychological processes and physiological 
activity. Neurological and biochemical bases of behavior with emphasis upon the synergistic 
functions of the nervous system, sense organs, and glandular system. 
Prerequisite: 48.101, 48.260, 48.261, or consent of instructor. 

48.401 FOUNDATIONS OF CONTEMPORARY PSYCHOLOGY 3 sem. hrs. 

A study of the historical development of modern psychology. Compares present-day 
models of behavior within a historical framework. 
Prerequisite: 48.101. 

48.406 PSYCHOLOGY SEMINAR 3 sem. hrs. 

An advanced consideration of significant topics in psychology. Reports and dis- 
cussions of current research. Course may be repeated with change in topic. 
Prerequisite: 21 hrs. in psychology and consent of instructor. 

48.416 ADOLESCENCE 3 sem. hrs. 

Study of developmental, personal and social issues confronting adolescents as they 
emerge from childhood and strive for adulthood. 
Prerequisite: 48.101. 

48.436 THEORIES OF PERSONALITY 3 sem. hrs. 

Critical study of theories explaining development, structure and organization of 
personality. Considers personality from psychoanalytic, social, individual, self and learning 
points of view. 
Prerequisite: 48. 101 

48.439 INTRODUCTION TO CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY 3 sem. hrs. 

A survey of clinical psychology and the role of the clinical psychologist in com- 
munity and hospital mental health programs, clinical assessment and diagnosis; and exami- 
nation of concepts in and models of psychotherapy. 
Prerequisite: 48.335 or 48.436 or consent of instructor. 

48.451 LABORATORY TRAINING IN GROUP PROCESSES 3 sem. hrs. 

An examination of theories of interpersonal interaction, the development of self con- 
cepts, and the formation and development of group cultures. Class size limited to 20 
students. 
Prerequisite: 48.101 and consent of instructor. 

48.454 PSYCHOLOGICAL STUDY OF SOCIAL ISSUES 3 sem. hrs. 

Selected social issues (e.g., conflict, social change) studied in terms of intra-individual 
processes and of interactive processes between the individual and society. Emphasis on re- 
search findings and theory as to possible alternatives or solutions to current practices. 
Course may be repeated with change in topic. 
Prerequisite: 48.101, junior standing, or consent of instructor. 

48.458 NONVERBAL COMMUNICATION AND 

INTERPERSONAL RELATIONS 3 sem. hrs. 

Experiential and experimental investigation of interpersonal and intrapersonal com- 
munication based on various communication modes (i.e. verbal, non-verbal, vocal). Under- 
standing of research and theory in relation to selected problems in communication. Con- 
ducting experimental research and experiential aspects of communication are stressed. 
Prerequisite: 48.251 or consent of instructor (48.260 recommended). 

48.464 ADVANCED EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN 3 sem. hrs. 

An advanced consideration of the planning, conduct, and evaluation of research in 
the behavioral and biological sciences, employing parametric and non-parametric statistics. 



4^ Sim Ii i| i x,-, \Mi Sim |\| Will \KI 



I mphasis on inferential statistics, design, analysis, interpretation and computer utilization. 

Prereq u isite, 48*101, 200, 261 or consent of Instructor. 

48.466 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN PSYCHOLOG1 i-^m.hrs. 

I he study of a topic \ia either review and research of technical psychological litera- 
ture or empirical manipulation of \anables in the field or laboratory under supervision of a 
Psychology faculty member resulting in a written report of its outcome. 
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor and departmental approval. 

[see section 7.5] 

48.497 PRACTICl M IN PSYCHOLOGY 3-12 sem. hrs. 

An introduction to psychology as a profession, with opportunity provided for stud>. 
observation, and practice in the setting of a community agency, or post-secondary educa- 
tional institution. May be repeated for a total of 12 semester hours. 

SOCIOLOGY AND SOCIAL WELFARE 

facui n 

Professors James H. Huber. (Chairperson). Chang Shub Roh. Ralph R. Ireland; ASWM 
Professors Christopher F. Armstrong, David E. Greenwald. Jane J. Plumpis. Bernard J. 
Schneck; Assistant Professors Charles W. Laudermilch. I. Sue Jackson. 

SOCIOLOGY: 

Arts and Sciences major for the B.A. degree: 

Sociology major: 45.211, 460, 462, 466; 18 semester hours in sociology and or 
anthropology elected by the student in consultation with the adviser. 

For a concentration in social welfare, the student should include among the elec- 
tives 45.233, 234, 336 and seek the adviser's recommendation for the remaining 9 
semester hours of electives. 

COURSE DESCRIPTIOSS 

SOCIOLOGY 

(Code 45) 

45.211 PRINCIPLES OF SOCIOLOGY + 3 sem hrv 

Basic characteristics of group behavior: organization of >ociei\ and culture; indi- 
\idual and community adjustment in the light of the origin, development, form, and func- 
tions of society. 

45.213 CONTEMPORARY SOCIAL PROBLEMS + 3 sem. hrv 

Urgent social problems, and proposals offered for their solution. Topics include 
social change, personal maladjustment, social disorganization, mobility, families, and aging 

45.233 INIRODl ( I ION I () SOU \I WORK 3 sem hrv 

An orientation to the profession of social work including an examination of his- 
torical And current social work processes, \alues and practice in \arious settings 

45.315 RACIAL AND NATIONA1 MINORITY GROUPS 3 sem. hrs. 

\n interpretation of the process of ethnic assimilation in cultural and structural 
terms I he maior theories of Anglo-conformity, melting pot. and cultural pluralism are re- 
viewed with particular reference to four maior groups the Irish. Italians. Blacks, and 
Jews I he approach is sociological and historical, and there is discussion of group charac- 
teristics as uell as problems o! adjustment to the American wa\ of life. 
Prerequisite 45,21 1. 



Sociology ( <>i rses 149 

45.316 URBAN SOCIOLOGY 3 sem. hrs. 

Analysis of origin and growth of the city in the U.S. with emphasis on socio-eco- 
logical changes and the dynamic patterns of interaction on the contemporary scene as 
viewed from a cross-cultural perspective. 
Prerequisite: 45.21 1. 

45.318 SOCIAL STRATIFICATION 3 sem. hrs. 

This course examines the role of social class in terms of its structure, function, and 
persistence in any society. There is an examination of classical theoretical statements and 
current evaluation of American class relations in terms of status, power, authority, and 
social mobility. Notable studies of the American class system are covered and a close look 
at power relations and styles of life among the various American classes. A convenient sub- 
title of this course might be who gets what and why. 
Prerequisite: 45.211. 

45.319 RELIGION AND SOCIETY f 3 sem. hrs. 

Analysis of the relationship between religion as an institution and society as a social 
process. 
Prerequisite: 45.211. 

45.331 MARRIAGE AND THE FAMILY f 3 sem. hrs. 

Study of the traditional and changing institutions of marriage and the family in 
contemporary society. 
Prerequisite: 45.211. 

45.334 SOCIAL CASEWORK 3 sem. hrs. 

An examination of social work values, fheories and techniques in modern social case- 
work practice. 
Prerequisite: 45.211. 

45.335 SOCIAL WELFARE SERVICES | 3 sem. hrs. 

An introduction to the public and private social welfare systems emphasizing the 
responsibilities of the social worker and the relationship between social work and the other 
professional disciplines. 
Prerequisite: 45.211 and 45.233. 

45.336 CHILD WELFARE 3 sem. hrs. 

An examination of child welfare services and the institutions which impinge upon the 
social functioning of children. 
Prerequisite: 45.211 and 45.233. 

45.337 COMMUNITY ORGANIZATION PRACTICE 3 sem. hrs. 

Community Organization Practice as a methodology of the social work profession is 
studied with respect to its relevant systems, theories, strategies, and practice principles. 
Prerequisite: 45.211 and 45.233. 

45.341 CRIMINOLOGY 3 sem. hrs. 

Theories of causes of crime, including physical type, differential association, psy- 
chiatric, etc. Volume, scope, and trends in crime; police, administration of justice, rehabili- 
tation theory and practice. 
Prerequisite: 45.211. 

45.350 INDUSTRIAL SOCIOLOGY 3 sem. hrs. 

An examination of work and the milieu of the worker; formal and informal organi- 
zations in industry; problems of the worker; industrial morale and teamwork; social adjust- 
ment of the worker; and the relation of industry to the community and society. 
Prerequisite: 45.211. 



( ol ksls 

4v44l SOCIAL INDICATORS m. hrv 

I his count is deiigncd to reinforce and extend earlier learning in research techniques 

and methods b> focusing upon systematic step-b\-step understanding, anahsis and prepara- 
tion of social indicators at the Federal, State, and local level polic> planning and 
anaksis I he emphasis is on developing student understanding of social indicators and their 
use in planning uithin the five county region. 
Prerequisite 45.21 1 . 

45.442 JUVENILE DELINQUENCY 3sem.hr>. 

1 \amination of social pressures operative upon children in American society uhich 
leads to formation of delinquent personality. Consideration of treatment and prevention, ju- 
venile courts, clinics and correctional institutions, evaluation of theories, concepts and rele- 
vant empirical research. 
Prerequisite: 45.21 1. 

45.443 SOCIOLOGY OF DEVIANT BEHAVIOR 3 sem. hrv 

This course evaluates the presence and function of deviance in society; its various 
types, including mental illness and various types of crime and stigmatized behavior; and 
how it is handled therapeutically and legally: institutionalization and treatment. It attempts 
to provide a broad theoretical perspective as well as concrete examples of deviance in an\ 
society. The last third specifically examines current methods of rehabilitation and punish- 
ment. 
Prerequisite: 45.21 J. 

45.450 COMMUNICATION THEORY IN SOCIAL WORK PRACTK I 

TO SOCIAL WORK PROCESSES 3 sem. hrv 

An analysis and application of concepts from communication, information, and 
systems theory to social work practice. 
Prerequisite: 45.21 1. 

45.457 SOCIOLOGY OF COMMUNITY LIFE 3 sem. hrv 

A review and examination of theories and research of the concept of community, 
with special emphasis on the impact of social change upon rural-urban community life. 
Prerequisite: 45. 211. 

45 460 BASIC SOCIAL STATISTICS 3 sem hrv 

Introductory principles and techniques of statistical analysis with emphai 
plication to sociological data; collection and tabulation of data; probability, inference and 
estimation; measures of dispersion; sampling and correlation, regression and predictabi! 
Prerequisite 45.21 1. 

45.461 S()( I VI PROBLEMS IN Rl RAI-I RBAIS ( OMMl MllrS 3 srm. hrv 

Oft] problems which are peculiar to and characteristic of rural and small urban 
communities. An eclectic theoretical interpretation is made of the major problems with em- 
phasis on those which result in the d\sfunctionmg of patterned social relationships. 
Prerequisite 45 211. 

45.462 SOCIOLOGICA1 IMIOKV 3 sem. hrv 

An examination ol the classical and modern forms ol sociological theory. 

211. 

45.465 ADVANCED METHODS OF RURAL-URBAN \N\nsis 3 sem. hrv 

l'rohabilit\ theory, sampling, and statistical inference applicable to rural-urban area 
analysis \ mphasis is placed on the problem imolved in researching the changing social 
composition ol rural-urban communities 
frereuuisiie 45.211, 



Sot [OLOCn ( !oi RSI s 151 

45.466 SOCIAL RESEARCH 3 sem. hrs. 

Methods and techniques in social research. Preparation of social research projects, 
questionnaires, sampling, interviews, etc. Introduction to methods of analysis and in- 
terpretation of data. 
Prerequisite: 45.21 1 and 45.460 or equivalent. 

45.467 POPULATION PROBLEMS 3 sem. hrs. 

Distribution of population, its composition, and other characteristics; size, trend, 
growth and future developments of population; impact of population problems as in- 
fluenced by process of fertility, morality, and migration. 
Prerequisite: 45.21 1. 

45.468 SOCIAL SERVICE PLANNING 3 sem. hrs. 

Social context of the theories and practices of social planning, social policy and 
social services from contemporary and cross-cultural perspectives. 
Prerequisite: 45.21 1. 

45.470 SENIOR SEMINAR 3 sem. hrs. 

Individual research projects and reports within selected area of interest such as the 
family, criminology, social stratification, and ethnic minorities. 

Prerequisite: 18 hours of sociology including 45.211, 45.460 and 45.466, and permission of 
the department chairperson. 

45.471 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN SOCIOLOGY 1-6 sem. hrs. 

Designed specifically for the student who wishes to pursue individualized instruction 
in depth with the faculty member in a specific area of the field. 

Prerequisite: 45.211, 45.460, 45.462, 45.466 and permission of the instructor and the depart- 
ment chairperson. 

[see section 7.5] 

45.473 SOCIAL DESIGN AND THE RURAL-URBAN COMMUNITY 3 sem. hrs. 

A seminar discussion of methodology relevant to rural-urban social community 
design. Each student participates for one session in which the individual discusses a piece of 
design work which he/she deems valuable in the design of communities and which arises 
from his/her particular interests. 

45.474 CONTEMPORARY ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES 3 sem. hrs. 

Some major human problems that lead to environmental deterioration, particularly 
water, air and noise pollution, energy and other resource depletion, and increasing popula- 
tion density. 
Prerequisite: 45.211. 

45.475 SEMINAR IN SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY, AND 

THE RURAL-URBAN ENVIRONMENT 3 sem. hrs. 

This course will examine the interdependence between science and technology and 
the relationship of these twin processes of social change and rural-urban community 
development. 
Prerequisite: 45.211. 

45.476 SOCIOLOGY OF SCIENCE 3 sem. hrs. 

This course treats science as the organized activities of an occupational community. 
It examines the development of science as an institution, its social organization in modern 
society, and its internal and external politics. 
Prerequisite : 45.211. 

45.477 COMMUNITY LAND USE PLANNING 3 sem. hrs. 

This course is designed to expose the student to the planning process and the 
theoretical perspectives relevant to community land use planning. Selected substantive plan- 
ning problem areas in the local community will be examined. Students are expected to 



152 SciK li \\l> M US ( OMMl HU Wins Cm hsis 

formulate, develop and present | community land use plan as the culmination of the course 

e x p eri ence 

f'rcrtquiutf 45.211. 

45.490 SOCIOLOGY OF AGING 3 *em. hrv 

I his course fterva as general introduction to the field of aging. Gerontology is a field 
ol study and practice which concerns it self with the social processes of aging and their con- 
sequences for the individual, institution and society 
Prerequisite: 45. 21 1 

45.496 INTERNSHIP PROGRAM 1-15 sem. hrs. 
Designed primarily for the Junior or Senior student working in a specific institu- 
tional field and or the College-approved off-campus activities related to the student's 
chosen professional field. 

Prerequisite: 45.211, 45.460, 45.462. 45.466 and permission of the Department Chatrper* 

45.497 SOCIOLOGY FIELD WORK EXPERIENCE 1-6 sem. hrv 

Placement in community agencies for supervised field work experience under the 
guidance of professional sociologists, social workers, and or other mental health specialists 
and educators. On-campus seminars provide a framework of psycho-social theory, skills, 
and professional ethics. 
Prerequisite: 45.211, 45.460, 45.462, 45.466 and permission of the Department Chairper^ 

SPEECH, MASS COMMUNICATIONS, AND THEATER 

FACULTY: 

Professor Melville Hopkins (Chairperson); Associate Professors William Acierno. Richard 
Alderfer. Erich Frohman, Michael McHale, Robert D. Richey; Assistant Professors George 
Boss, Hitoshi Sato, Harry Strine, Janice Youse; Adjunct Associate Professor Ralph Smiley. 

SPEECH/THEATER: 

Arts and Sciences major for the B.A. degree: 

25.103. 206, 241, 325; 26.208 or 25.321; 26.312; 

Elective: Twelve semester hours in Public Address courses chosen from Code 25 

courses or twelve semester hours in Theatre courses chosen from Code 26. Thirty 

total semester hours. 

\l\ss ( OMMl NIC ATIONS: 

Vrts and Sciences major for the B.A. degree: 

Requirements: 15 hours ot the core courses listed below uith 23.103 as I prcreqi: > 

(ore Courses 20.105, 25.307, 27.231, : ; 'H) or 27 115 

(Introduction to Journalism. Business and Professional Speech. Introduc- 
tion to Radio and Iclcusion. Mass Communication and the Popular 
Ihcatrc as Mass Media or Cinema Appreciation) 

In addition to the core courses, the student may pick one area o! concentration though it is 
recommended that tWO areas ol concentration be selected 

I ol 
Concentration ADVERTISING, PUBLICITY \\n PUBLIC RELATIONS 

lot RNALISM, RADIO, rELEVISlON, AND FILM 

ADVERTISING M.345, 93.442 Prerequisites : 

40 : I 1 . 40 2 I 2 

JOURN \l ism 20 



Si-l K II \\n M \ss COMMl m< \iion COI KM s 153 

PUBLICITY AND 

PUBLIC RELATIONS: 20.255, 20.302, 25.421, 27.332, 93.346 Prerequisites: 40.211, 40.212 

RADIO: 27.331, 27.335, 27.480. 93.342, 93.345 Prerequisites: 26.240, 

40.211,40.212 
TELEVISION: 27.331, 27.335, 27.338, 27.482, 93.342 Prerequisites: 26.211, 

40.211, 40.212 
FILM: 27.130, 27.360, 27.361, 27.460 Prerequisites: 26.211, 26.314, 27.115 

COURSE DESCRIPTION 

SPEECH COMMUNICATION 

(Code 25) 

Courses marked f may be used toward General Education. 

(Note: Requirements for the major for the B.S. in Ed. degree are found in the section 
on Secondary Education, School of Professional Studies.) 

25.103 INTRODUCTION TO SPEECH t 3 sem. hrs. 

A basic course in speech, with emphasis on interpersonal communication. 

25.104 INTERPERSONAL SPEECH/COMMUNICATION t 3 sem. hrs. 

An analysis of rhetorical situations that emphasize an intimate setting for developing 
interpersonal speech, communication. 

25.105 COMMUNICATION THEORY AND RHETORIC + 3 sem. hrs. 

Surveys classical rhetoric and contemporary theories in communication; includes be- 
havioral science, semantics, and philosophy of language. 

25.108 FORENSICS + 1 sem. hr. 

Participation in forensics: debate or individual speaking events. Participation for two 
semesters for one semester hour. May be repeated for maximum of three semester hours. 

25.205 RHETORICAL THEORY t 3 sem. hrs. 

The course highlights major trends in rhetoric from Aristotle to contemporary rhe- 
torical theorists. 

25.206 ORAL INTERPRETATION OF LITERATURE + 3 sem. hrs. 

Practice in skills necessary for intellectual and emotional meanings of poetry and 
prose read to an audience. 
Prerequisite: 25. 103, or consent of instructor. 

25.215 COMMUNICATION THEORY f 3 sem. hrs. 

A study of Communication Theories as they relate to contemporary speech situa- 
tions. 

25.218 DISCUSSION f 3 sem. hrs. 

Survey of and practice in types and patterns of public discussion. 
Prerequisite: 25. 103, or consent of instructor. 

25.220 INTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATION t 3 sem. hrs. 

An overview of speech communication as it relates to socio-cultural differences that 
reflect ethnic and racial experiences, knowledge, and values. 

25.241 VOICE AND DICTION t 3 sem. hrs. 

A study of vocal organs and phonetics; practice for vocal effectiveness. 

25.307 BUSINESS AND PROFESSIONAL SPEECH 3 sem. hrs. 

Business and professional communication; policy conferences and interviewing. 
Prerequisite: 25.103. 



IMMI SI( UIO\ ( 

25.321 \K(.l Mhl MION 3 stm. hn. 

BMM principles of argument. Practice through debate; vmtten practice through a 
brief 
Prerequisite 25. t03. 

M EXTEMPORE SPEECH 3 sem. hn. 

Analysis of extemporaneous speech based on the correlation of thinking and speak- 
ing. 
Prerequisite 25. 103. 

25.421 PERM VSION 3 sem. hn. 

Ethical and scientific approaches of human motivation. Principles and oral practice. 
Prerequisite: 25. 103. 

25.492 SEMINAR: PUBLIC ADDRESS 3 sem. hn. 

Investigation in depth of a speaker, a period, or a movement. 
Prerequisite: 9 semester hours in Public Address or consent of instructor. 

THEATRE ARTS 

(Code 26) 
26.107 THEATRE + 1 sem. hr. 

Participation in plays: acting or technical work. Participation for two semesters for 
one semester hour. May be repeated for maximum of three semester hours. 

26.208 INTRODl CTION TO THEATRE ARTS + 3 sem. hrs. 

A survey: criticism, direction, play production, theatre history, stage design, and act- 
ing. 

26.209 THE THEATRE OF TODAY * 3 sem. hn. 

A course designed to project materials that will make the experience of the theatre- 
goer more discerning, discriminating, analytical, and critical. Field trips required. 

26.211 THEATRE PRODUCTION + 3 sem. hn. 

Planning, execution and supervising production work and business procedures. 

26.231 INTRODUCTION TO RADIO AND TELEVISION * 3 sem. hn. 

A survey o\ communication practices in radio and television. Laboratories in 
classroom. 

26.240 PIAYWRITIV, 3 sem. hrs. 

\ study of dramatic structure, writing sty les. and types of drama. Student writes full- 
length (or equivalent) play Adaptations o\ other forms oi literature acceptable. 

26.311 S( ENI DESIGN 3 sem. hn>. 

Studies of design problems in \arious stvles and periods, application o\ research and 
preparation of working drawn || 

' the instructor. Sophomore standing or belter. 

26.312 FUNDAMENTALS OF ACTING 3 sem. hrs. 

Introduction to the theories and techniques o\ acting Individual and group OCR 

26.314 si u.i \nd LIGHTING: THEORY OF LIGHTING 3sem.hr.. 

Intensive study of theory, design of lighting of a production supplemented by applied 
work on productions 

' the instructor. Sophomore standing or better. 

26.318 CREATIVE DRAMATICS 3 sem. hrs. 

Improvisational techniques for the classroom for playmaking with children. 



Is 



26.319 CHILDREN'S THEATRE + 3 sem. hrs. 

Theories, techniques and literature of theatre for children. Laboratory hours. 

26.411 PLAY DIRECTION 3 sem. hrs. 

Study of the principles and techniques of play direction, with demonstrations, 
exercises, and production. 
Prerequisite: 26.208 or consent of the instructor. 

26.414 COSTUMING FOR THE STAGE + 3 sem. hrs. 

Historical developments and elements of design. Laboratory hours. 

26.415 HISTORY OF THE THEATRE + 3 sem. hrs. 

Survey of structures, production practices, and plays from the beginnings to Ibsen. 
Prerequisite: 26.208 or consent of the instructor. 

26.416 MODERN THEATRE 3 sem. hrs. 

Practice and philosophy of theatre since Ibsen, with emphasis on American theatre. 
Prerequisite: 26.415 or consent of the instructor. 

26.490 SEMINAR: THEATRE 3 sem. hrs. 

A concentration may be offered on an individual artist, a period, or a movement in 
theatre. 
Prerequisite: 9 semester hours in Theatre or consent of the instructor. 

MASS COMMUNICATION 

(Code 27) 

27.115 CINEMA APPRECIATION + 3 sem. hrs. 

A course dealing with film form, theory and criticism to bring about a better under- 
standing and greater appreciation of the motion picture. 
5 hours I week: 3 class, 2 laboratory. 

27.130 HISTORY OF THE FILM t 3 sem. hrs. 

An overview of the history of the motion picture. Film genres, historical figures, 
technicians, and performers studied. Course paper required. 
Prerequisite: 27.115 or consent of instructor. 5 hours /week: 3 class, 2 laboratory. 

27.225 MASS COMMUNICATION AND THE POPULAR ARTS + 3 sem. hrs. 

The study and relative impact on society and education in: television, radio, film, 
drama, press, advertising, cartoons, popular music, and photography. 



i< H \M> Mvss COHMI M< ITION Cot Ksts 

27.231 INTRODUCTION TO RADIO AND TELEVISION 1 3 stm. hr>. 

A survev of communication practices in radio and television, laboratories in 

classroom. 

27.300 THEATRE AS M \SS MKDIl M 3 ^m. hrs. 

A study of theatre and its influences on the masses. The theatre as a didactic, in- 
formative, pleasurable, and entertaining medium. 

27.330 DESIGN IN ADVERTISING 3 sem. hrv 

Deals with copy and layout of advertisements for magazines and newspapers. Prin- 
cipal emphasis is on design (TV and radio advertising included). 

27.331 TV AND RADIO: BROADCAST 

PROGRAMMING WD MANAGEMENT 3 sem. hrv 

A study of TV and Radio management, programming and the media as a business 

(industry). 

27.332 PI BLIC RELATIONS 3 sem. hrs. 

Course examines PR. in our social and economic fields. Basic theories and prin- 
ciples are studied. 

27.335 BROADCAST JOURNALISM 3 sem. hrv 

A study of the technical elements, script formats, and non-dramatic materials. 
Student learns to write and announce news, commercials, etc. 
Prerequisite: 2 7. 23 1 . 

27.338 TELEVISION ACTING AND DIRECTING 3 sem. hrs. 

Course provides instruction in acting and directing for TV. 

27.360 FILMMAKING 

The course covers the entire basic process of filmmaking in an introductor> and 
comprehensive manner. Maximum 5 clock hours per week, 6 credits for two noon 
semesters in a given academic year. 

27.450 PERSl ASION IN ADV ERTISING: 

PRINT AND NON-PRINT MEDIA 3 sem hrs 

Advertising as persuasive communication. TV. radio and print advertising are studied 
and analyzed. 

27.460 HIM THEORIES AND TECHNIQ1 rS 

A comprehensive lecture and lympottum investigating the theories oi film and film 
language, film techniques, and the aesthetics of film images and sounds. 

27.480 SEMINAR IN RADIO PRODI ( TION WD WRITING 3 sem. hrs. 

Opportunitv to study and practice all aspects oi radio lab hours required 

Prereq u isite: 27.231 or consent of instructor. 

27.482 SFMIN \R IN IN FMSION PRODI ( HON WD WRITING 3 sem. hrs. 

Opportunity to study and practice all aspects oi IV I ah hours required. 

27.497 INTERNSHIP IN COMMUNICATION 3-15 sem. hrs. 

(max. 9 per sem.) 
Open to Junior or Senior majors in Mass Communication An off-campus uork- 
studv program to he arranged bv the student, advisor and agency. Consent of advisor 
needed Course mav he repeated. Credit not to exceed 15 hrs. 



Schooi of Business 157 

8. School Of Business 

8.1 GENERAL INFORMATION 

The School of Business offers a curriculum in Business Administration with 
five options for specialization, a curriculum in Business Education with five op- 
tions for certification areas, and a curriculum in Office Administration. 

The curriculum in Business Administration is designed to prepare the 
student for a beginning position in business; the curriculum in Business Education 
leads to certification as a teacher of business subjects in secondary schools; and 
the curriculum in Office Administration prepares the student for administration 
and supervision of the business office. 

Students may enroll in the School of Business as freshmen. During the first 
year, the students pursue basic courses, after which they apply for admission to a 
specialized curriculum. 



8.2 PROGRAMS WITH MAJOR SPECIALIZATION IN THE 
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS 

Program Degree 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Specialization: Accounting 
Economics 

Information Processing 
Management 
Marketing 



B.S. 



BUSINESS EDUCATION 

Specialization: Accounting 
General 

Information Processing 
Marketing 
Secretarial 
Office Administration 



B.S. in Ed. 



B.S.O.A. 




S (MINISTRATION 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

FACULT1 

Professors Man I) Carey, Limes H Creasy, Bernard C. Dill, Norman I Miliar (Chair- 
person). Francis .1 Radice. Mclwn I Woodward, William \1 Young; .Associate 
Profcsson J. Weston Baker, Charles M Bayler, Barbara E Behr, Fred I Biettj 
\1 Chapman, I ester J. Dietterick, Harold k Frey, David G Heskel, Robert N Watts; 
tanl Professors: Patricia Boyne, John E Dennen. Francis J (iallagher, E. Burel Gum, 
John I Hart/el. Ierr\ Jones. David Khalifa. Michael R Lynn, Richard I Met cllan. 
Salim Qureshi, Robert P. Von; Instructor: IJieodore Hart/. 

Degree 

The degree. Bachelor of Science in Business Administration. (B.S. in Bus. Adm 
(onferred upon successful completion of the Business Administration curriculum. 

Objectives 

The curriculum in Business Administration aims to develop in the student specialized 
knowledge and skills applicable to entry into the business world. It cultivates the potential 
for future growth leading to an eventual position of leadership. For this purpose the student 
is exposed to an understanding of modern business in its relationship to societ 
nomic forces, of the intellectual processes involved in management decision-making and of 
the modern decision-making tools. A concern for personal development in such attributes as 
intellectual discipline and culture is integrated into the general education and hu^. 1 
courses. 

Curriculum Requirements 

The curriculum in Business Administration requires the successful complei. 
sets of courses. 

A. General Education (See Section 6.4) 

B. Core Courses: Mathematics 53.114; Economics 40.246 or Mathematics 53.1 
53.123; General Business 90.331; Accounting 91.221, 222. 323; Information Plw 
ing 92.250; Management 93.342, 343. 344. 445. 446; Economics 40 21 I. 212. 346. 413 

( . Specialization in one of the following areas 

ACCOUNTING 

General Business 90.332; 
Accounting: 91.321, 322. 421. 422. 423 

MANAGEMEN1 

Genera] Business 90.332; Information Processing ^2 23 
Management: 93.345, 444. 44^ 

Bi MNhss ADMINISTRATION- U ONOMM S 
I conomki 40 311, 312, 313; 422 oi 423 

INFORM viion PRO< ESSING 
456 

\1 \Rkl I INC. 
93 44(1. 442. 443, 444. 452 

I). Elective courses to complete a minimum of 63 semester hours in business and 
economics, chosen from Economics 40.313, 315, 346. 410. 422. 423. 433. 446; 

General Business 90 1 12 Accounting ^i 42 1. 422. 423, 430, 44,s. information Proce ss- 
ing 152, 454, 456; Management 93.341, 345. 346, 348, 442. 443. 444. 

44^. 44v). 455; Hjgtoo 42 123; PiycholOfi 4s 452; Speech 25.307. 
I . Eree elective as required to meet the total 128 scm. hr. graduation requirement. 



Bi siness Administration Courses 159 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

GENERAL BUSINESS 

(Code 90) 

90.101 INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS 

ORGANIZATION AND FINANCE t 3 sem. hrs. 

An introductory course open to all students, this course provides study of business 
and its environment. An examination of business organization, the functional areas of 
operation and their interrelationships, and the interaction of business with government and 
society helps the business student develop a unified framework for subsequent study in 
depth of specific aspects of business. For the non-business student, the course will help to 
develop an appreciation of the American enterprise system, functions of, and issues facing, 
modern business. 

90.241 SALESMANSHIP 3 sem. hrs. 

Principles underlying the sales processes; the salesperson in relation to his/her firm, 
goods, and customers; approach, demonstration, and close of individual sales transactions. 

90.331 BUSINESS LAW I 3 sem. hrs. 

An introduction to legal rights and liabilities; sources of law and judicial system; 
principles of law applicable to business transactions with particular reference to contracts, 
property, and sales. 

90.332 BUSINESS LAW II 3 sem. hrs. 

Principles of law as they pertain to negotiable instruments, guaranty and surety 
contracts, insurance, principal and agency relationships, creditors rights. 
Prerequisite: 90.331. 

90.334 BUSINESS MATHEMATICS 3 sem. hrs. 

Concepts and principles related to fundamental business operations. Credit, in- 
surance, taxes, selling and finance, investments, the interpretation of statistical data; 
methods of teaching business arithmetic in the secondary school. 

90.431 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN BUSINESS 3 sem. hrs. 

Open to Seniors only. Topic and outline of Project must be approved by Dean and 
Faculty Sponsor. 

90.432 INTERNSHIP IN BUSINESS 1-15 sem. hrs. 

Provides students with opportunities to acquire meaningful experiences in practical 
work situations in accounting, management, finance, marketing, and related fields. 
Prerequisite: Approval by Department Chairperson, Junior or Senior standing, and GPA of 
2.75 or higher. 

ACCOUNTING 

(Code 91) 

91.221 PRINCIPLES OF ACCOUNTING I 3 sem. hrs. 

Development of the accounting cycle covering both service and merchandising 
activities of a sole proprietorship; special journals and special ledgers, accrued and deferred 
items, and business papers. 

91.222 PRINCIPLES OF ACCOUNTING II 3 sem. hrs. 

Further development of the accounting cycle; recording, summarizing, and interpret- 
ing financial data for partnerships and corporations; development of an understanding of 
the voucher system. 
Prerequisite: 91.221. 



Dl SUM. 

11.321 INTERMEDIATI ACCOUNTING 1 3 vem. hrv 

Preparation and interpretation ot principal accounting statements; theoretical 
CUOMOM of the standards ot good accounting practice, with emphasis on current items. 

Prereq u isite: w 222 

91.322 INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING n 3 sem. hrs. 

Standards ol good accounting practice with emphasis on non-current items; solution 
and discussion ot \anous contemporars accounting problems; detailed analysis of major fi- 
nancial statements of business organizations. 

91.323 ACCOUNTING FOB MANAGEMEN1 DEI Ision 3 sem. hrs. 
Management problems of depreciation methods, valuation of good will, hidden 

balance sheet reserves, inventory valuation, the price level and historical cost, budget and 
actual costs, and tax planning. The flows of cost accounting, financial accounting, and tax 
accounting are considered. 
Prerequisite: 91.222. 

91.421 COST ACCOUNTING 3 sem. hrs. 

An in-depth study of the three major production costs, raw material, labor, and fac- 
tory overhead for a job order cost system. 
Prerequisite: 91.321. 

91.422 AUDITING THEORY AND PROCEDURE 3 sem. hrs. 

Principles, standards, procedures, and techniques applicable to internal and public 
auditing; consideration of the audit report and development of working papers for prepara- 
tion of the report. 
Prerequisite: 91.222. 

91.423 FEDERAL TAX ACCOUNTING 3 sem. hn. 

Procedures in accounting as dictated by Federal Tax laws; laws governing the 
preparation of Federal Income Tax return for individuals and small businesses. 
Prerequisite: 91.222 

91.424 STATE AND FEDERAL TAX PROBLEMS 3 sem. hrs. 

Group and individual assignments selected from the following areas of advanced tax 
accounting: Partnerships and corporations, Pennsylvania corporate taxes, estates and t- 
reporting to governmental agencies. Lectures, discussions of issues, practice in the solution 
of problems 
Prerequisite: 91.42} 

91.430 ADVANCED ACCOUNTING I 3 sem. hrs. 

Application of accounting principles to special problems found in the consolidation 
and merger oi business enterprises Includes consideration of the bases for such combina- 
tions; consolidated statements at date oi acquisition, as uell as at subsequent dates, foreign 
branches and subsidiaries. 

Prerequisite: w $22 

91.431 ADVANCED ACCOUNTING II 3 sem. hrs. 

Application ot accounting principles to special problems found in fiduciary rela- 
tionships, governmental and institutional units, and actuarial science I mphasis ■ gi\cn to 
bankruptcy, estates and trusts. go\ernment fundi, and nonprofit scmce organizations 

Prerequisite 91 

91.44X ADVANCED COS1 ACCOUNTING 3 sem. hrs. 

\ continuation Oi 91.421 concentrating on process cost, standard cost and budgets. 
I mphasis is placed on methods used to analyze and interpret cost dl 
Prerequisite. 91.421. 



|\ioK\i \ l ION PRO* l SSING 161 

91.449 CPA PROBLEMS 3 KB, hrs. 

The application of procedures for the solving of 8 cross-section of complex account- 
ing problems, and the discussion of related theory and practice. 
Prerequisites: 91.322. 421. 422, 423. or consent of instructor. 

INFORMATION PROCESSING 

(Code 92) 

92.250 INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER AND 

INFORMATION SCIENCE 3 sem. hrs. 

Introduction to the use of the computer for problem solving and processing of in- 
formation. Includes hardware, programming concepts, flowcharting techniques, punched 
card processing and data communications. "Hands on" experience is available through the 
use of interactive time-sharing terminals. 

92.251 MINI/MICRO PROGRAMMING SYSTEMS 3 sem. hrs. 

This course will present a survey of the minicomputer and microcomputer capability 
available to the small business. It will focus on business applications and system design 
considerations applicable to Mini/ Micro Programming Systems. Programming experiences 
in RPG II will be emphasized and experiences in BASIC appropriate to the MINI/ MICRO 
environment will be explored. 

92.252 BUSINESS ORIENTED PROGRAMMING 3 sem. hrs. 

Designed to familiarize the student with the COBOL language and to develop the 
student's ability to use COBOL as an effective problem solving language. The student 
defines, writes, tests, debugs, and documents several COBOL problems. 
Prerequisite: 92.250. 

92.254 MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS 3 sem. hrs. 

Use of computer-based information systems to provide information for effective deci- 
sion making. Data base concept; data entry; operator-machine interaction; data retrieval 
concepts. 
Prerequisite: 92.252. 

92.256 DATA AND INFORMATION STRUCTURES 3 sem. hrs. 

A detailed study of operations and applications with character strings, linked lists, 
graphs and trees emphasizing techniques and mechanics of programming using a high-level 
list processing language. Includes a study of file structure and data base concepts. 
Prerequisite: 92.252 or 53.271. 

92.350 ANALYTICAL COMPUTING CONCEPTS 3 sem. hrs. 

Designed to familiarize the student with the Basic Assembly Language in an effort to 
develop further understanding of the computer, including registers, multi-programming, and 
time sharing. Compiler type languages are reviewed through an object code analysis. Tape 
and disc concepts. 
Prerequisite: 92.252 or 53.271. 

92.352 ADVANCED PROGRAMMING 3 sem. hrs. 

Advanced concepts of programming in COBOL with major emphasis on table hand- 
ing. Index Sequential Files, sub-routine linkage and real-time programming. Students are 
required to write, test, and debug programs. 
Prerequisite: 92.252. 

92.354 ADVANCED COMPUTER PROCESSES 3 sem. hrs. 

A further examination of computer characteristics through the Basic Assembly Lan- 
guage. Topics include lists, chained lists, queues, double-threaded chain lists, program selec- 
tion and linking, physical level I/O, and macro-writing. Compiler construction is discussed. 
Prerequisite: 92.350. 



i.tsnsr 

MJM OPERATING SYSTEMS 3 sem. hrs. 

An m-dcpth look if operating systems to include real and virtual operating systems 
and communications loftwtft and techniques. Includes diagnostic tacilities. utility routines, 
and system commands 

w. 

92.358 HARDVN \RF \R(HIIF(IIRF AND CONFIGURATION 3 sem. hrs. 

Includes an examination of the current market in frames, peripherals, terminals, data 

entry devices, minicomputers, etc. The student will gam additional practical experience in 

feasibility studies, cost analysis, and contract negotiations. 

92.452 SYSTEMS ANALYSIS AND DESIGN 3vem.hr*. 

Buk systems analysis and design, forms design, data collection, data files, file 
maintenance, systems llou-charting. integration of systems, feasibility studies, systems im- 
plementation and documentation. 
Prerequisite: 92.252 

92.456 MANAGERIAL COMPUTER APPLICATIONS 3 sem. hrv 

Practical experience in the analysis of business problems. Advanced techniques and 
concepts of programming and system analysis with major emphasis on record keeping 
systems, control systems, and management information systems. Students are required to 
present a systems proposal 
Prerequisite: 92.452 



MANAGEMENT 

(Code 93) 

93 341 RETAIL MANAGEMENT CONCEPTS 3 sem. hrs. 

Presents retailing as a dynamic aspect of the marketing distribution system lltimate 
consumer market analysis, store location, store layout, merchandising, pricing, promotional 
issues and problems, are considered, using retail cases. 
Prerequisite: Eton 40.211. 40.212. 

93.342 MARKETING: PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICES 3 sem. hrs. 

A survey oi the fundamental features of contemporary marketing systems and of the 
planning required to make available want-satisfy ing goods and services to customs 
profit The role of marketing in society and the institution! which compose the market 
system Components o\ the marketing mix product planning, distribution, pricing and 
promotion. 
Prerequisite: Econ 40.211 and 40.212. 

93.343 Bl SI NESS FIN AM F 3 sem. hrs. 

\ stud\ ot financial problems in the areas of working capital management, capital 
budgeting, cost of capital, financial structure, financing sources, asset \alualion. and di- 

videni policy 

Prerequisite 92.222, 40.211 ami 40.212. 

93.344 MANAGEMENT PROCESSES 3 sem. hrv 

Fundamentali ol organization and admin ist rat ion Classical, Behavioral and 

Management science schools, principles and practices in planning, organizing and controll- 
ing business activities; and operating functions in I business firm. 
211, 212 

93.345 PERSONNEL MAN AGEMEN1 3 sem. hrs. 

Policies and current practices in the selection, placement, training-development. 
evaluation, compensation and motivation oi employees at all lev els in business firms. 



Managemeni 163 

93.346 LABOR AND INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS 3 MB, hrs. 

Administration of the relationship between management and the labor force, both 
where the relationship is governed by a formal agreement and where it is not. Includes the 
development of the social and legal status of trade unions, the process of collective bargain- 
ing and the evolution of modern social welfare programs. 
Prerequisite: Econ. 40.211 and 40.212. 

93.348 OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT 3 sem. hrs. 

An introductory course in operation problems encountered in manufacturing and 
service industries. 
Prerequisite: 93.344. 

93.430 SECURITY MARKETS 3 sem. hrs. 

A study of stock and bond market operations, security exchanges, and brokerage 
firms; market and security price behavior; institutional and individual investors. 
Prerequisite: 93.343. 

93.440 CONSUMER MOTIVATION AND BEHAVIOR 3 sem. hrs. 

The role of the consumer as the ultimate buyer of the product. Analysis of the 
strategy and forces directed at the consumer by the seller. Topics include: models of 
consumer-buying behavior, consumer motivation, impact of advertising on product, 
consumer as decision maker in the market place. Selected cases. 
Prerequisite: 93.342. 

93.441 INVESTMENT MANAGEMENT 3 sem. hrs. 

Principles of security investments: descriptions of security investments; investment 
planning, security valuation; portfolio strategy; security markets. (Summer Session only.) 
Prerequisite: 93.343, and permission of instructor. 

93.442 ADVERTISING MANAGEMENT: 

ORGANIZATION AND PLANNING 3 sem. hrs. 

Advertising is considered as a marketing/ promotional mix component and tool. Ad- 
vertising strategy and copy media selection; budgeting; advertising research; relevant issues 
including social, legal and ethical concerns. 
Prerequisite: 93.342. 

93.443 SALES MANAGEMENT 3 sem. hrs. 

The personal selling element of the marketing/ promotional program is studied from 
a management perspective. Recruiting, selecting, training, organizing, motivating, com- 
pensating, evaluating and controlling the sales force are treated, as well as management's 
planning responsibilities including designing intelligence systems, forecasting and establish- 
ing sales territories. Special consideration is given to sales management's inputs and integra- 
tion with marketing management. 
Prerequisite: 93.342. 

93.444 MARKETING MANAGEMENT 3 sem. hrs. 

An advanced study of the marketing function and marketing programs from the 
systems and managerial viewpoint. Analytic, communicative, and problem-solving skills ap- 
plied to evaluating and creative planning in the marketing environment. Business marketing 
cases are used as a vehicle for developing these marketing executive abilities. 
Prerequisite: 93.342. 

93.445 MANAGERIAL COMMUNICATIONS 3 sem. hrs. 

Study of the process and structure of communication in the business organization 
and factors affecting the flow of information. Emphasis on verbal, non-verbal and written 
communication as they relate to managerial responsibility. Group discussion exercises and 
individual research and writing projects relate these principles to the attainment of profi- 
ciency in managerial communication. 



IM \1\NV(,IMIM 



9.V446 STRATEG1 \sdsiki CTURE 

Stud\ ol the process b> which management set goals, obje^ 
procedures 

Ph. r, qm .:, Senior Standing. 



3 sem. hrv 
policie 



93.447 RESEARCH STUDIES IN MANAGEMENT 3 sem. hrv 

Identification of a problem, investigation, and preparation of a report on an indi- 
vidual basis. I he student selects a problem related to some field of Business Administration: 
accounting, finance, advertising, marketing, general and personnel management. 
frerequisite: Senior standing and consent of the instructor. 

93 449 ORGANIZATION THEORY 3 sem hrs. 

A study of business organizations as social systems, and of the interactions between 
the individual, the group, and the organization. 
Prerequisite: 93.344. 

93.452 MARKETING RESEARCH 3 sem. hrs. 

Development and application of the skills of the scientific marketing research 
procedure (problem definition, research design, data collection, analysis and interpretation) 
and recent developments in marketing information systems are brought to apply to product 
planning, advertising research, consumer and competitive analysis. 
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: 93.342. 

93.455 ADVANCED FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT 3 sem hrs 

The study of business financial problems and the development of advanced financial 
management practices as used in the decision-making role of the financial manager. 
Prerequisite: 93.353. 

93.456 INTERNATIONAL MARKETING MANAGEMENT 3 sem hrv 

Application of the managerial process to the development of international marketing 
programs. Emphasis is placed on the development and determination o\ objective! and 
methods of organization including the execution of research, advertising and distribution 
activities. Consideration is given to special problems of adopting marketing principles to fit 
conditions in different countries. Selected cases and readings 
Prerequisite: 93.342. 



BUSINI ss EDI < \ I ION 165 



BUSINESS EDUCATION 



FACULTY: 



Professors: Ellen I.. Lcnsing; Associate Professors: Harold K. Fney; Clayton H. Hinkel; 

James C. Kincaid; Margaret J. Long (Chairperson); Jack L. Meiss. 

Degree 

Tfie degree. Bachelor of Science in Education (B.S. in Ed.), is conferred upon suc- 
cessful completion of the Business Education curriculum. Tfie degree of Bachelor of Science 
in Office Administration (BSOA) is conferred upon successful completion of the Office 
Administration curriculum. 

Certification 

Upon completion of the curriculum and recommendation of the College, the 
Pennsylvania Department of Education issues an Instructional Level I certificate. No certifi- 
cate shall be issued hearing only one certification area; every certificate shall include 
Typewriting, in addition to at least one other area of certification. 

Objectives 

The curriculum in Business Education aims at developing specialized knowledges and 
skills applicable to the first teaching position in the secondary schools and vocational- 
technical schools of the Commonwealth. 

Admission 

Freshmen who are interested in business education enroll initially as general students 
in the School of Business. Admission to the Business Education curriculum during their 
freshmen year. High school work in business subjects is not prerequisite to the college 
program. 

Curriculum Requirements 

The requirements of the curriculum include five sets of courses as follows: 

A. General Education (Section 6.4) 

B. Business Education Core Courses: Speech 25.103; Economics 40.211, 212; 
Psychology 48.101; Sociology 45.211 or Anthropology 46.200; Educational Studies 
60.393; Mathematics 53.101; Business General 90.101, 331, 332; Business Accounting 
91.221; Business Information 92.250; Business Secretarial 94.201, 202, 301 or 302, 
401. 

C. Business Education Specialization. The student chooses one of the following areas 
of certification: 

Accounting: General Business 90.334; Accounting 91.222, 321, 322; one course from 
91.42.1, 422, 423; six semester hours from the Elective List below. 

Secretarial: 94.21 1, 212, 31 1, 333; Six semester hours from the Elective List below. 

General: (COMPREHENSIVE— Accounting and Secretarial): Accounting 91.222, 
321, 322; Secretarial 94.211, 212, 311; General 90.334 or Secretarial 94.333; three 
semester hours from the Elective List. 

Business Information Processing: Business Information Processing 92.250, 252, 350, 
452, 454; Mathematics 53.1 1 1; Economics 40.246, 346. 

Marketing: Business General 90.241; Business Management 93.341, 342, 440; Busi- 
ness Accounting 91.222, 321, 322; three semester hours from the Elective List. 



( HI I \ K I \ I 



Unlive list: Business General 90.241, J34 M 94J33; Business Accounting 91.421, 
422. 42 V 430; Business Information 9 .\ Business Management 

93 341, 342. Other courses in business may he used upon recommendation ot the 
ad user 

I). F*rofessional hducation: I he student should have completed the following CO • 
before enrolling in 65.404 Professional Semester in Business Fducation 

Psychology 48.101 General Psychol n. hrs. 

Psychology 48.271 Educational Psychology • , . hrs. 
Sociology 45.211 Principles of Sociology 

or \nthropolog\ 46.200 Principles of Anthropolog\ n hrs. 

Education 60.393 Social Foundations of Fducation n hrs 
ndar\ fducation 65.396 Curriculum and 

Instruction in the Secondary School BL hrs 
Secondary Education 65.404 Professional Semester 

in Business Education n. hrs. 

E. Free Eleetives as required to complete the total graduation requirement of 128 

sem. hrs. 

Office Administration 

The program in Office Administration (BSOA) is designed for those students 
interested in the administration and supervision of the business office (NOTl 
program does not lead to certification as a business teacher.) 

The requirements of the curriculum includes six sets of courses as folio.-. 

A. General Education: (Section 6.4), to include Introduction to Speech 25.103; I 
nomics; 40.211, 212; General Psychology; 48.101; Principles of Sociology: 45.211 or 
Principles of Anthropology: 46.200; Mathematics 53.110; or Mathematics 53.1 14 

B. Basic Business Courses: Introduction to Business: 90.101; Business Lan 331 
Business Mathematics 90.334; Principles of Accounting: 91.221, 222; Business In- 
formation Processing 92.250. 

C. Office Procedures: Secretarial Procedures: 94.312, Business Correspondence; 
94.333; Records Management & Office Machines: 94.401. 

D. Management Courses: Retail Management Concepts: 93 .341; Business Finance: 
93.343; Marketing Principles: 93.342; Accounting for Management Decision 9| 
Personnel Management: 93.345. 

E. Skills ( ourses: Secretarial: 94.201, 202, 301 . 2 I 1 , 2 I 2. 3 1 1 . 3 I 2; Business Informa- 
tion Processing 92.250; Internship in Business: 90.432. 

F. Eleetives in Business 6 sem. hrs. chosen with help of aduscr 

( o( RSI OESi RIFTiONS 

SK Kf I \KI\I 
I (ode 94) 

94.201 INPrWRIllM. I 3 sem. hrs 

Presentation and master) ot the keyboard and operating parts oi the typewriter; 

stroking techniques and control, instruction in preparing personal and business letters, en- 
velopes, carbon copies, reports, manuscripts, and tables, leaching techniques 

94.202 TYPEWRITING II 2 sem. hrs. 

Production techniques. t\pmg letters, envelopes, and cards, multiple carbon work. 
preparation of manuscripts, tabulation, and legal forms, preparation of stencils and liquid 
N masters, teaching techniques 

Prerequisite: w 201. 



Sk R| i MM m 167 

94.211 SHORTHAND I ^ sem. hrs. 

Beginning course in Gregg Shorthand Diamond Jubilee. 

94.212 SHORTHAND II 3 sem. hrs. 

Development of ability to read shorthand notes. 
Prerequisite: 94.211. 

94.301 TYPEWRITING III AND TRANSCRIPTION 2 sem. hrs. 

Advanced application of typewriting skills. Coordinated with Shorthand III and 
must be scheduled concurrently with Shorthand III by students seeking certification in shor- 
thand. 
Prerequisite: 94.202. 

94.302 TYPEWRITING III 2 sem. hrs. 

Advanced applications of typewriting skills. For students not enrolled in the Secre- 
tarial curriculum. 
Prerequisite: 94.202. 

94.303 TYPEWRITING WORKSHOP 2-3 sem. hrs. 

A workshop designed to provide for the varying needs of students with diverse back- 
grounds, especially transfer students. Material covered would depend upon individual 
student's background, prior coursework and needs. 

94.311 SHORTHAND HI 3 sem. hrs. 

Practice in dictation and transcription of shorthand, with speed and accuracy 
stressed; grammar, shorthand penmanship, and principles of teaching of shorthand. 
Prerequisite: 94.212. 

94.312 SECRETARIAL PROCEDURES 3 sem. hrs. 

Secretarial activities with emphasis on decision making and human relations. Simu- 
lated office situation. 
Prerequisite: 94.311 

94.333 BUSINESS CORRESPONDENCE AND REPORTS 3 sem. hrs. 

Review of essentials of grammar; study of the vocabulary of business; composition of 
various types of business letters; organizations and preparation of business reports; teaching 
techniques. 
Prerequisite: 94.202. 

94.401 RECORDS MANAGEMENT AND OFFICE MACHINES 3 sem. hrs. 

Management of business records; filing methods and systems; office electronic, print- 
ing, rotary, and key-driven calculators; transcribing machines; teaching techniques. 

94.412 ADVANCED SHORTHAND WORKSHOP 3 sem. hrs. 

Dictation and transcription involving the use of different shorthand systems — ma- 
chine, symbol, and non-symbol. Development of a degree of proficiency in the use of a dif- 
ferent shorthand system; techniques and methods of teaching shorthand. Students are re- 
quired to research the implementation of shorthand on the high school level. 
Prerequisite: 94-311. 



Professionai Studies u>y 

9. School Of Professional Studies 

9.01 ORGANIZATION AND FUNCTIONS 

The School of Professional Studies administers curricula in teacher educa- 
tion, nursing, and allied health sciences, offers the courses in education, special 
education, communication disorders and nursing, and coordinates work in 
ROTC. 

Five departments of the School offer courses in professional education and 
administer teacher education programs for elementary and secondary schools. 

9.02 DEGREE PROGRAMS WITHIN THE SCHOOL OF 
PROFESSIONAL STUDIES 

Program Degree 

Communications Disorders B.S. in Ed. 

Early Childhood Education B.S. in Ed. 

Elementary Education B.S. in Ed. 

Secondary Education B.S. in Ed. 

Biology 

Chemistry 

Communications 

Earth Sciences 

English 

French 

General Science 

German 

Mathematics 

Physics 

Social Studies 

Spanish 
Special Education B.S. in Ed. 

(mentally and/or Physically Handicapped) 

9.03 TEACHER EDUCATION 

9.03.1 GENERAL INFORMATION 
Scope of Teacher Education 

Programs are offered for preparation of teachers for elementary schools, 
teachers of academic subjects in secondary schools, teachers in special education, 
teachers of communication disorders and teachers of business education. The 
business education program is administered in the School of Business; the other 
teacher education programs are administered in departments of the School of 
Professional Studies. 

Aims 

The teacher education program at Bloomsburg State College is committed 
to improving the field of education through a comprehensive program which 
recognizes its unique contributions to society, both as a reflection of that society 
and as an agent for the improvement of society. To meet this obligation, the 
program draws upon the knowledge and understandings of general as well as of 
professional education and strives constantly to blend the two in preparing a 
person who exhibits those qualities of human and technical competence necessary 
to fulfill a role in society as an informed, inquiring, and skilled professional. 



170 I I \< III K I HI i M ION 

More ipecificalry, the teachei education st.iit provides 

the basic academic preparation foi persons to acquire a depth and breadth 

ot knowledge in both general and ipecialized studies. 

the basic training to insure master) ol the specific skills necessary for 
competent functioning as a professional; 

the Opportunity fof the continued growth of professional educators through 

formal programs ol advanced Study related to their particular held ot interest. 

the opportunity for further enrichment within the individual's area of 
professional competence through a regular program ol speakers, seminars, and re- 
lated activities; 

the human and physical resources necessary to assist in the educational 
development and growth ol the community served by the College; and 

the means for the advancement of knowledge through research in specific 
areas of education. 

Degree 

Each of the undergraduate programs for teacher education outlined in this 
catalogue leads to the degree. Bachelor of Science in Education (B.S. in Ed). 

Accreditation of Teacher Education 

The College is accredited by the National Council for the Accreditation of 
Headier Education (NCATE). The teacher education programs outlined in this 
bulletin have been approved for teacher certification by the Pennsylvania Depart- 
ment of Education. 

Teacher Certification 

The completion of one of the approved programs in teacher education is 
prerequisite to institutional recommendation for a teacher's certificate. Upon 
recommendation, an initial certificate is granted by the Commonwealth o\ Pen- 
nsylvania. 

The initial certificate is designated as Instructional level I: it is valid for 
three years and may be renewed for three additional years upon completion of 
twelve semester hours of college credit beyond the baccalaureate, and certification 
of three years of successful teaching. A Level 1 certificate is not subject to renewal 
beyond a total of six years. A permanent certificate. Level II. is issued upon cer- 
tification o\ three years ol successful experience under 1 evel I and the completion 
o\ a minimum of twenty-four semester hours of post-baccalaureate course work 
(the twenty-four semester hours may include the twelve semester hours required 
in case the Level I certificate was renewed). 

I he programs offered tot level 1 certification are: 

Elementary Education ( Kindergarten through grade 6). 

Early Childhood Education (Preschool through grade 3), 

Business Education Accounting. Secretarial. Business Information 

Processing, General. 

Seconder) Education Biology, Chemistry, Communication. Earth 

Science, I nglish, French, General Science. German, Mathematics. Physics, 

Social Studies. Spanish 

Special Education Mentally and oi Physicall) Handicapped. 

Communication Disorders Speech Correction 01 Hearing Impaired 
Public School Dental Ihgicnist 

Reciprocity of Teachers' Certificates 

Pennsylvania ia a part) to the Interstate Agreement on Qualifications for 
Educational Personnel which provides thai holders ol Pennsylvania certificates 

are eligible foi certificates in the other states which are parties to the agreement. 
Currently, there are twentv-threc such states 



I I \( III R I Dl ( MION 171 

Admission to Teacher Education 

Students who wish to take teacher education curricula enroll tentatively in 
the School of Professional Studies and schedule courses in harmony with the re- 
quirements of the program they wish to follow. In due course the students apply 
for admission to teacher education. Usually, the screening for admission to 
teacher education takes place after the student has completed 32 or more semester 
hours and has taken the Sophomore Field Experience intended to help the appli- 
cant to assess his/her decision. Scholarship and pertinent personal attributes are 
weighed in determining admission to teacher education; the criteria reflect the 
responsibility of a college whose recommendation is a sufficient basis for the issu- 
ing of a teacher's certificate. If students who were tentatively enrolled in the 
School of Professional Studies are not admitted to teacher education, they are 
transferred to the School of Arts and Sciences. 

Retention in Teacher Education 

Admission to teacher education is equivalent to candidacy for the degree, 
Bachelor of Science in Education. Candidacy for this degree is revoked in case of 
failure to maintain the required Quality Point Average and may be revoked for 
other sufficient reason. If candidacy is revoked but the student is otherwise eligi- 
ble to remain in the College he/she is transferred to the School of Arts and 
Sciences; in this case the student who wishes to be reinstated must reapply for ad- 
mission to teacher education. 

Field Experience 

Students in teacher education are required to engage in the Sophomore 
Field Experience during which they work in and observe the educational process 
in a school of their choice. It is intended that this experience will help the 
students decide befofe the Junior year whether they wish to follow careers in 
teaching. Participants are exposed to many aspects of teaching and to the opera- 
tion of the whole school, thus providing experience that should increase the rele- 
vancy of course work in professional education. 

Other field experiences in addition to student teaching are participated in as 
part of certain courses in professional education, these may take the form of field 
trips, observations, and micro-teaching. 

Student Teaching 

Pre-professional teacher education culminates in student teaching for a 
semester in public schools of Pennsylvania. 

Undergraduates who have satisfied the prerequisites for student teaching 
courses are assigned to student teaching during the first or second semester of 
their senior year. They are placed according to the availability of qualified 
cooperating teachers in their subject area and the willingness of schools with pro- 
grams approved by the College to cooperate with the College in its program in 
teacher education. Students should be prepared to accept assignments in any of 
the student teaching centers. 

The student teaching semester is divided into two equal periods; this 
provides an opportunity for students to teach at two grade levels and frequently 
in two socio-economic environments. 

Because of the constantly changing educational and socio-economic scene, 
flexibility of format is maintained in the student teaching program. 

Student Teaching Centers 

The College selects its student teaching centers and cooperating teachers in 
urban, suburban, and rural areas. Students in elementary education may be 



Medk \i Ik hnokk.v- 



attigncd to central Pennsylvania, to suburban Philadelphia, or to certain mner- 
citv locations. Students in secondary education ma> be assigned to teach in 
central Pennsylvania, in suburban Philadelphia, or in the cities of Philadelphia 
and Harrishlirg. Business education student teaching centers are located in the 
Bloomsburg. Allentown. and Williamsport areas. Students in communication 
disorders and special education are assigned to the White Haven Center. Selins- 
gro\e Center, and to public schools and other agencies located in southeastern 
Pennsylvania. 

It may be possible for students in teacher education programs to be 
assigned to do their student teaching in one of the centers abroad with which 
Bloomsburg cooperates: Quito, Ecuador; Recife, Brazil; or Liverpool, England. 
Further information about this program may be obtained in the Office of 
International Education. 

9.04 ALLIED HEALTH SCIENCES 

(Dr. James E. Cole, Program Coordinator) 

The allied health sciences encompass those health areas in which individuals 
support, aid, and increase the efficiency and effectiveness of the physician, dentist, 
and professional nurse. 

The curricula offered at Bloomsburg State College include: medical 
technology, dental hygiene, pre-occupational therapy, pre-physical therapy, and 
pre-cytotechnology. Completion of these programs involve clinical education and 
experience — usually away from the college campus. The college offers degrees in 
only the first two curricula, — B.S. in Medical Technology and B.S. in Ed. for 
Dental Hygienists. 

9.04.1 MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY CURRICULUM 

(Dr. Donald D. Rabb, Curriculum Coordinator) 

The formal program Medical Technology consists of 98 semester hours of 
courses prescribed by the College, followed bv one year o\ clinical study and 
experience in an approved School of Medical Technology. Bloomsburg State 
College has formed affiliations with: Abington Memorial Hospital, Abington. 
PA.; Geisinger Medical Center, Danville, PA., (major affiliate): Iancaster 
General Hospital, Lancaster, PA.; Robert Packer Hospital. Sayre, PA.; Sacred 
Heart Hospital, Allentown, PA.; St. Joseph's Hospital. Reading. PA.; Wilkes- 
Barre General Hospital, Wilkcs-Barre, PA.; Williamsport Hospital, Williamsport, 
PA. Affiliations pending: Medical College of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. PA. and 
Allentown and Sacred Heart Hospital Center. Allentown. PA 

The student enrolls initially in Pre-professional Studies and follows the list 
of courses prescribed in the Medical Iechnologv program Application for 
transfer to the School ot Professional Studies and formal admission to Medical 
Technologv mav be made after the student has earned 30 semester hours of credit 
and before the completion of M semester hours. 

The student is assisted to applv for admission to clinical year programs, but 
admission is determined solely by the hospitals. More students applv than the 
schools of Medical Iechnologv can accept; this permits the schools to be 
rigorous!) selective. 

I he cost of a clinical year vanes widely. At one time, students in clinical 
programs were customarily paid a stipend, but only a verv lew schools have 
continued the practice. The majority provide no stipend but offer free tuition. A 
few charge tuition ot SMX) pel vear or more. 

I he candidate may choose to satislv either o\ two degrees as follows: the 
degree. Bachelor of Science m Medical Technology (B.S. in Med. Tech.) ifl 



Dentai Hyoii m 173 



conferred upon successful completion of the prescribed course work, the certifica- 
tion to the College of successful clinic experience, and the passing of the exami- 
nation of the Board of Registry of Medical Technologists; or the degree Bachelor 
of Science (B.S.) will be conferred upon successful completion of the course work 
and certification to the College of successful completion of the clinical experience, 
but without the passing of the Registry Examination. 

A student who fails to gain admission to a clinical program at the end of 
the junior year may return to the College to complete the requirements for a bac- 
calaureate degree or may take a leave of absence (See Section 4.12) to preserve 
his right to return later. Ordinarily the student can complete the Bachelor of Arts 
curriculum in Biology in one additional year; other curricula may require more 
time. Students who are on leave, as well as those who continue their studies, are 
eligible to reapply for admission to the clinical year programs. 

The course requirements of the Medical Technology Program are: 

A. General Education (See Section 6.4) 

B. Specialization 

Biology: 50.210; 50.332 or 333; 50.312 or 331 or 361 or 364, 50.371 or 372; 50.342; 

Chemistry: 52.101* and or 52.102, 52.113, 52.122, 52.211 or 52.231 and 52.232. 

Mathematics: 53.111 or 141; 

Physics: 54.107; 

Elective courses to complete 98 semester hours. 

C. Clinical Experience 

Medical Technology: 89.400 

Certification of the clinical experience and registry examination is accepted for the 
final 30-33 semester hours of the 128 semester hour graduation requirement. 

*52.101 may be waived through satisfactory score on a placement examination 
administered by the Department of Chemistry. 



9.04.2 CURRICULUM FOR DENTAL HYGIENISTS 

The degree, Bachelor of Science in Education, will be conferred upon 
dental hygienists meeting the following requirements: 

1. The possession of a valid license to practice dental hygiene in the Com- 
monwealth of Pennsylvania issued by the State Dental Council and 
Examining Board and the Department of Education. (The professional 
education requirements for dental hygiene are the satisfactory comple- 
tion of an approved dental hygienist course of instruction of two years 
of not less than thirty hours each week, or its equivalent in and gradua- 
tion from a dental hygiene school approved by the State Dental Council 
and Examining Board.) 

2. The satisfactory completion in addition thereto of 70 credit hours of 
professional and general education courses distributed as follows: 

A. General Requirements (48 hours) 
English 20.101, 200 or 201 
Speech 25.103; 
Geography 41.101, 102; 
Geography, 41.101, 102; 
Sociology 45.21 1 or Anthropology 46.200; 
Literature, two electives, Speech, one elective; Art, one elective; Music, one 

elective; Political Science, one elective; Economics, one elective; History, 

two electives in World History, one in U.S. History. 



174 I III KM". 



B. Professional hducation i I I hours) 

Piycholog) 48 101, 271; 

i ducation 60 
I ducation 60.301 

( . Free Klecti\es as necessary to complete the minimum of 7 semester hoi. 

9.04.3 PRE-OCCl PATIONAL THERAPY, PRE-PHVSK AI 

THERAPY CURRICULA 

Although requirements for admission to professional schools of physical 
and occupational therapy vary, the student is advised to take one year of uork in 
each of chemistry, physics, mathematics, and biology. Entrance into professional 
schools usually follows two to four years of undergraduate preparation, hence, 
the student is encouraged to design a program which may lead to a baccalaureate 
degree at Bloomsburg State College. 

9.04.4 PRE-CYTOTECHNOLOGY CURRICULUM 

Prior to acceptance into an AMA-approved educational program for 
cytotechnologists, the applicant is required to have completed two years of uork 
in an accredited college or university. The pre-cytotechnology curriculum at 
Bloomsburg State College is concentrated in the biological sciences. 

9.04.5 PUBLIC SCHOOL NURSING CURRICULUM 

(Mr. Robert Bunge, Curriculum Coordinator) 

This curriculum is being phased out. No new students are admitted, but 
current active students who maintain continuous enrollment or who return at the 
end of an official leave of absence will be permitted to complete the work as out- 
lined in the 1974-75 catalog. 




( lOMMl M< \ I ION I MSORDI i<s 175 

COMMUNICATION DISORDERS 

FACULTY: 

Professor Gerald W. Powers; Associate Professors Benjamin S. Andrews, Robert J, Kruse 

(Chairperson); Assistant Professors Ronald R. Champoux, Pearl (i. (Jrossman. (i Donald 

Miller, Samuel B. Slike, Richard M. Smith and Julia M. Weit/; Instructor Catherine M. 

Constable. 

Program Description 

The objective of this curriculum is to prepare personnel to work in public 
schools, hospitals, clinics and rehabilitation centers with individuals who are 
handicapped in speech, hearing and language. 

Upon successful completion of the curriculum and recommendation by the 
College, certification in speech correction is granted by the Pennsylvania Depart- 
ment of Education. The curriculum provides academic and clinical work which 
constitute part of the prerequisite for the Certificate of Clinical Competence in 
Speech Pathology or Audiology issued by the American Speech and Hearing 
Association; additional prerequisites include a master's degree and certain 
prescribed experience. 

Students in the Curriculum in Communication Disorders are required to 
complete the master's degree before they are eligible for recommendation by the 
College for Certification. (The requirements for the master's degree appear in the 
Graduate Catalogue.) 

Admission to the undergraduate curriculum in Communication Disorders is 
selective. Students must take a minimum of nine semester hours in courses of the 
Department of Communication Disorders before they may apply for admission. 
The normal time for application by regular students is in the middle of the 
sophomore year. Transfer students, readmitted students, graduate students in 
Communication Disorders who have undergraduate deficiences and students who 
are re-applying for admission compete on equal terms with regular students at 
each selection period. 

Selection within the quota for each selection period is determined by rank- 
ing the product of Quality Point Average in the courses that have been taken in 
the Department of Communication Disorders; and the Cumulative Quality Point 
Average. Other professional factors determine the selection in case there is a tie in 
the measure — in this case the decisions are made by the faculty of the Depart- 
ment. 

The precise quota for each selection period is pre-determined by the De- 
partment in the light of the projected capacity of clinical facilities, subject to a 
maximum of thirty-five students to be admitted each year. 

Students who are not admitted may re-apply at a subsequent selection pe- 
riod. 

A minor in Education of the Hearing Impaired has been planned for 
students in Elementary Education. The courses in this minor may also be taken 
by students in Secondary Education, Business Education, Special Education and 
Early Childhood Education. Students who elect this sequence may seek advise- 
ment from the faculty of the Department of Communication Disorders. Students 
who complete the courses of the minor in addition to their teacher education 
major are eligible to compete for admission to the graduate program in Educa- 
tion of the Hearing Imapired. 

CURRICULUM IN COMMUNICATION DISORDERS 

(Dr. Robert Kruse, Curriculum Coordinator) 

A. General Education. (See Section 6.4) 

B. Professional and related requirements. Communication Disorders 74.152, 251, 
252, 253, 276, 351, 352, 376, 402, 460, 461, 467; 

English: 20.311; Biology: 50.366; 



< OMMI M< MKA DlsoKIUKs CO! KMs 



Fifteen semester hours elected with departmental approval trom "). 452. 

466. 472, 475, 480, 4s 101, 211, 260, 121, 575, 416, 70 101.255,20.411,44 

( . Elective courses to complete the minimum graduate requirement 

( o( RSI DESi RIP I low 
(Cod 

74.101 CLINICAL VOICI tND ARTICULATION lsem.hr. 

Voice production and articulation; individualized guidance with personal speech pro- 
blems. A Jmnal experience planned for anv student who seeks to improve his her . 
and articulation 

74.152 INTROD1 ( HON TO (OMMI \I( MION DISORDERS 3 sem. hrs. 

An introduction to the stud> of human communication and communication 
disorders: the role oi professionals in speech and language pathology and education of the 
hearing impaired: hasic processes and functions of human communication, typical prohlems 
oi children and adults. 

72.201 HISTORY, EDI CATION AND GUIDAN< r 

OF THE HEARING IMPAIRED 3 sem. hrs. 

The handicap of hearing impairment is explored with emphasis on the historv o\ 
educational procedures and guidance in communicati\e. psychological and vocational 
rehabilitation. 

74.205 INTRODUCTION TO INSTRUCTIONAL METHODS 

FOR THE HEARING IMPAIRED 3 sem hrs 

Students are introduced to the design of instructional procedures and methods of im- 
plementing curriculums for education of the hearing impaired. Traditional and innovative 

approaches to teaching are discussed and demonstrated. 

74.251 PHONETICS 3 sem hrs 
A study o\ the physiological, acoustical, perceptual, and descriptive aspects of speech 

sound production. Primary emphasis is placed on the description, classification, and 
transcription of speech sounds (following the IPA) presented in isolation, in words, and in 
connected speech. This course provides a base of knowledge for the diagnosis and treatment 
of phonemic and phonological disorders of communication. 

74.252 SPEECH PATHOLOGY I 3 sem hrs 

The neurophysiologies! bases of language and speech are studied as fundamental to 
the understanding o\ pathologies oi language and speech 
Prerequisite: 74,152, 251. 

74.253 SPEW H PATHOLOGY II 3 sem hrs. 

Dtinuation of detailed ttlMTj Ol the speech and language pathologies Research 
findings are explored 
/'', '< qubi 

74.276 INTRODUCTION TO AUDIOLOG1 3 sem. hrs. 

Camet, evaluation techniques, and rehabilitative procedures foi various types 

hearing problems, related auditors, speech, psychological, and educational factors, the roles 
Ol parent, educator, and specialist m the rehabilitation program Hearing conservation 
procedures in schools and industry. 

74.302 EXPERIENCE in EDI I viion Of \u\ Dl U 

\ND HEARING IMPAIRED 1-3 stm. hrs. 

I uperience Working under lupervision With deal and hearing impaired children in the 
demonstration classroom or Held facility. 
Prerequisite Permission of the Instructor. 



Communication Disorders Courses 177 

74.351 CLINICAL METHODS IN COMMUNICATION DISORDERS 6 sem. hrs. 
Materials and methods applicable to clinical practicum are discussed. Opportunities 

for observing demonstrations by the staff are provided. Students are trained in differential 
diagnostic procedures and the administration of speech and language therapy programs. 
Prerequisite: 74.152, 251, 252, 253 and admission to major. 

74.352 CLINICAL PRACTICUM: COMMUNICATION DISORDERS 6 sem. hrs. 

Students engage in supervised clinical work in the Speech, Hearing and Language 
Clinic or related facilities and are given increasing responsibility and experience with cases 
of greater complexity. 
Prerequisite: 74.351. 

74.376 AUDITORY TRAINING AND SPEECH READING 3 sem. hrs. 

Current teaching methods for educating children and adults with moderate and 
severe hearing losses. 
Prerequisite: 74.251, 276. 

74.390 DIRECTED PROJECT IN COMMUNICATION DISORDERS 3 sem. hrs. 

Students are given the opportunity to carry out special in-residence or field projects 
in professional service programs under the direction of the faculty or designated practi- 
tioners. A detailed project plan must be submitted for faculty approval prior to registration. 

74.402 CLINICAL FIELD EXPERIENCE 12 sem. hrs. 

A full semester program of 30 hours per week of supervised practicum in a field 
experience is provided for each student. Prospective speech and hearing clinicians gain 
experience by working with professional people in the field. Assignments emphasize provid- 
ing speech and hearing services in the public school, clinics and hospitals. 

74.452 ANATOMY OF SPEECH AND HEARING MECHANISMS 3 sem. hrs. 

Embryology, anatomy, neurology, and physiology of the larynx and ear. The 
processes involved in human speaking and hearing are explored. 

74.460 PSYCHOLINGUISTICS 

The study of language as a psychological phenomenon. Included are the following 
areas of study: language acquisition, meaning, biology of language, sociolinguistics, non- 
verbal communication, animal communication, and the application of psycholinguistics to 
communication disorders, among others. 
Prerequisites: 74.152, 251. 

74.461 CLINICAL PROBLEMS IN COMMUNICATION DISORDERS 3 sem. hrs. 

Practical considerations of day to day problems encountered by the speech clinician 
in public school, clinics and hospital programs; Pennsylvania School Law and State man- 
dated special service programs. 

74.462 PROBLEMS IN EDUCATION OF THE DEAF 

AND HEARING IMPAIRED 3 sem. hrs. 

The educational problem of hearing impairment and the functions of teachers in 
public and private educational settings. 

74.466 ADVANCED CLINICAL PRACTICUM (Internship) 3 sem. hrs. 

Clinical experience with more complex disorders. Differential diagnostic and thera- 
peutic procedures for use in cases with cerebral palsy, aphasia, auditory impairments, cleft 
palate, and stuttering. Case studies and research are utilized. 
Prerequisite: 74.351, 352. 



>MMI M< vims DlSORDi hs ( OH wsfv 
74.467 APPLIED BHIWiOK \N\hS|S|\ 

SPEECH AND LANGUAGE THERAPI * stm. hr*. 

Applications oi the psychology of learning to communicative behavior and clinical 
proble m . Current educational and therapeutic trends and prac! 
Prereq u isites 74.331 or concurrent registration. 

74.471 SEMINAR IN SPEECH PATHOLOG1 .Wm. hn. 
Pathological conditions resulting in communication problems are investigated; re- 
medial techniques are considered in relation to current research findings. 

74.472 MEAS1 REMENT OF HEARINC, LOSS 3 sem. hrs. 
I he anatomy and physiology of the hearing mechanisms Etiology of hearing losses, 

interpretation of audiometric evaluations and available rehabilitative procedures. Labora- 
tory experience in the administration of clinical audiometric evaluations. Emphasis on spe- 
cial tests and advanced audiometric procedures. 
Prerequisite: 74.276. 376. 

74.475 INTRODUCTION TO SPEECH SCIENCE 3 sem hrv 

The physical properties of acoustic signals are considered as factors that affect the 
nature of production and subsequent reception of speech. Phonetic instrumentation is in- 
troduced in relation to the analysis and synthesis of speech. Application of principles of 
speech science to speech therapy and other areas. 
Prerequisites: 74.152. 251. 253. 276. 376. 

74.480 INDEPENDENT STUDY AND RESEARCH 1-3 sem hrs. 

This course permits students to work under faculty guidance on library stud> o\ 
specified areas or on individual research or learning projects when particular needs cannot 
be met by registration in regularly scheduled courses. Credit is determined by the nature 
and scope of the project undertaken. 




Ihh 



I \h\\ Childhood wd Elementary Edu< moN 179 

EARLY CHILDHOOD 
AND ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 

FACULTY: 

Professors Donald Miller, Ann Marie Noakes, Donald Vannan, Lynn Watson, William 
Woznek; Associate Professors William O'Bruba (Chairperson) John Hranitz, Edward 
Warden, Henrietta Behrens, Charlotte Hess, Gorman Miller; Assistant Professors Richard 
Donald, Robert Remaley. 

Two curricula are offered, a curriculum leading to certification for kindergarten 
through grade 6 (designed K-6) and a curriculum in Early Childhood Education which leads 
to certification for Nursery School, Kindergarten and Grades 1-3 (designated N-K-3). The 
requirements of these two curricula are as follows: 

EARLY CHILDHOOD 

(Dr. John Hranitz, Coordinator) 

A. General Education. (See Section 6.4) 

B. Academic Background Courses: Mathematics, 6 semester hours; Biology, 3 
semester hours; Physical Science, 3 semester hours; nine semester hours in 
Psychology and Social Studies elected from three of the disciplines listed in Section 
6.4, including at least three semester hours in English. 

C. Professional Education and Early Childhood Education Specialization: 

PSYCHOLOGY 

48.101 — General Psychology 

48.211 — Developmental Psychology 

84.271 — Educational Psychology, or 60.391, Learning for the Learner 

N-K-3 (Early Childhood Certification) 
EDUCATION (Required) 

60.393— Social Foundations of Education or 60.394 Education in an Urban So- 
ciety 
60.301 — Education Media 

63.303— Methods and Materials in Elementary Science N-K-3 
62.231 — Introduction to Early Childhood Education 
62.322 — Seminar in Learning Experiences with Young Children 
62.371 — Teaching of Reading (Early Childhood Section) 
62.373— Diagnostic and Remedial Reading (Early Childhood Section) 
62.433 — Communicative Arts in Early Childhood 
62.432 — Social Studies in the Elementary School 
62.396— Mathematics for the Young Child 

62.401 — Student Teaching in Elementary and Early Childhood Education 
62.411— Professional Seminar: Elementary and Early Childhood Education 

ELECTIVES 

(15 semester hours must be elected from the following courses:) 

20.351— Literature for Children 

25.318— Creative Dramatics 

26.319— Children's Theatre 

32.275— General Crafts 

35.242— Class Piano I 

35.311 — Music in the Elementary School 

48.321— Psychological Tests and Measures or 60.311 Educational Measurements 

45.336— Child Welfare 



|M> \ I IMIM \KV I 1)1 ( MK.S 



; ^5 Reading lor the Socially Disadvantaged Child 

F76 Language I \penences for Children 

62.3X9 Individualizing Instruction Activities in the Elementary School 

70.201 Education oi Exceptional Children 

; 1() line Arts in I lementarv Education 

180 \ Stud) ol Discipline in the Elementary School 

05.31 I Methods and Materials in Elementary Physical Fducation 

KM Children*! Art 

I). Minor. A minor is optional I he statement relative to the minor in the K-6 cur- 
riculum is applicahle here. 

E. Free Electives if necessary to complete the minimum graduation requirement. 

ELEMENTARY EDI CATION 

Kindergarten Through Grade 6 

(Dr. William O'Bruba. Elementary and Early Childhood 
Curriculum Coordinator) 

A. General Education. (See Section 6.4) 

B. Academic Background courses: A teacher in the elementary school must "■ 
pared to teach manv subjects. To provide the background, the curriculum requires a 
broad distribution of academic background courses: frequently, these ma\ be elected 
from courses which are designed as General Education courses and therefore may be 
counted also toward the General Education requirement. Mathen: mester 
hours. Biology. 3 semester hours; General Science. 3 semester hours: 12 semester 
hours elected from three of the disciplines listed as Social Science in Section 6 4. 15 
semester hours elected from at least three disciplines listed as Humanities in Section 
6.4. including at least 3 semester hours in English. 

C. Professional Education and Elementary Specialization. These courses are intended 
to develop knowledge of the nature of the child, the nature of the school, the learn- 
ing process, general methods of teaching and methods of teaching particular subjects, 
and provide student teaching experience. 

PSYCHOLOGY 

48.101 -General Psychology 
48.211 E)evelopmental Psychology 

Z7I Educational Psychology, or 60.391. I earning and the I earner 

EDUCATION 

(required) 

60 393 Social Foundation o\ Education or 60.394 fducation in an Urban So- 
net) 

35 31 I Music m the I lementarv School 

05 311 Methods and Materials in Physical fducation 

4s 121 Psychological Iests and Measures or 60.311 Educational Measurements 

; "l Teaching ol Reading 

173 Diagnostic and Remedial Reading or 82375 Reading foi the Sociallv 

Disadvantaged child 

2 Methods and Materials in I lementarv School Science 
198 Methods and Materials in I lementarv Mathematics 

s Curriculum and instruction 
62 ; "i I ducation Media 

401 Student leaching in I lementarv and I arlv Childhood Education 
fi2 4II Professional Seminar I lementarv and larlv Childhood Education 



I I i MEN i un EDU< m ION COURSI s IXI 

ELECTIVE 

(Nine semester hours must be elected from the following courses) 

62.304— Practical Procedures and Practices in Environmental Education for the 

Elementary School Teacher 
62.310— Fine Arts in Elementary Education 
62.322— Seminar in Learning Experiences with Young Children 
62.376— Language Experiences for Children 

62.389— Individualizing Instruction Activities in the Elementary School 
62.480— A study of Discipline in the Elementary School 
20.351 — Literature for Children 
25.318— Creative Dramatics 
25.319— Children's Theatre 
05.320- Health and Safety in the Elementary School 

D. Minor. Each student is required to select a minor in which he/she takes eighteen 
semester hours. 

The selection of courses for the minor is subject to advisement by the department 
and approval by the student's curriculum adviser. 
The minor has no significance for teacher certification. 

E. Free electives if necessary to complete the minimum graduation requirement of 
128 semester hours. 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 
(Code 62) 

Courses marked t may be used for General Education 

62.302 METHODS AND MATERIALS IN 

ELEMENTARY SCHOOL SCIENCE 3 sem. hrs. 

Emphasis is placed on the major methods and materials used in elementary school 
science. The three major national programs of AAAS, SCIS, and ESS; individualized 
instruction; the "discovery" approach. A programmed textbook is used through which the 
student may move at his or her own rate of speed. 
Prerequisite: 3 Semester hours in biology and 3 semester hours in physical science. 

62.303 METHODS AND MATERIALS IN 

ELEMENTARY SCIENCE N-K-3 3 sem. hrs. 

Classroom activities from American schools and British Infant School programs; dis- 
covery method is stressed. 

62.304 ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION 

FOR THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL TEACHER 3 sem. hrs. 

Learning experiences for the elementary school level; integration of the topic with 
other curriculum areas. 

62.310 THE FINE ARTS IN ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 3 sem. hrs. 

Designed to provide competencies in the selection and implementation of materials 
and procedures for teaching the literary, visual, and performing arts to elementary school 
children. Emphasis is placed on the comprehension and integration of the fine arts into all 
areas of the school curriculum. 

62.321 INTRODUCTION TO EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION t 3 sem. hrs. 

An examination of the historical and philosophical foundations of Early Childhood 
Education. Analysis of current trends and practices for teaching children from the ages of 
birth to six. Open to students of all curricula and in-service teachers. 
Prerequisite: 48.201 and 48.211. 



182 EUMBNI \>n f Di < Ulns Cot ksis 

hi. Ml SEMINAR IN IF \RM\<. EXPERIENCES W I I H 

YOI N(. ( HII.DRFN 3 s*m. hrs. 

Physical, mental, emotional and social lc\els of children from birth to age 6, with at- 
tention to environmental factors that lostcr child growth; pre-school and kindergarten pro- 
grams to meet the needs of this age child and to provide the background of experience 
needed lor Liter \entures into reading, arithmetic, science, social studies, music, art, litera- 
ture, physical education and health. 
Prerequisite: 48.101 and 4H.211. 

62.370 READING FOR YOUNG CHILDREN, N v K-3 3 sem. hrv 

Developmental reading from readiness through the entire elementary school cur- 
riculum. 

62.373 DIAGNOSTIC AND REMEDIAL READING 3 sem. hrv 

Diagnostic and remedial procedures emphasizing both standardized and informal 
techniques. Designed for elementary and or secondary school teachers. 
Prerequisite: 62.371 and /or 62.372. 

62.375 READING FOR THE SOCIALLY DISADVANTAGED CHILD 3 sem hrs. 
Methods and materials for the instruction of the disadvantaged child (K.-12). Tech- 
niques and theories are presented as they may be applied to help the socially disadvantaged 
child function more adequately in the school environment. 

62.376 LANGUAGE EXPERIENCES FOR CHILDREN 3 sem. hrs. 

Language development of children and factors that influence skill in effective com- 
munication development from nursery school through the sixth grade. The course is also 
designed to provide a background for students in language arts and literature for children. 

62.389 INDIVIDUALIZING INSTRUCTION ACTI VI TI E S 

IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 3 sem hrs 

Designed for elementary education students with junior standing or above The 
course emphasizes procedures for helping individuals learn, the informal school concept. 
and rearranging the elementary classroom into an efficient and effective learning area uith 
emphasis on language arts centers, mathematics centers, science centers, and social studies 
centers British elemental education; elementary education in North Dakota and Vermont. 

62.395 CURRICUL1 M 1ND INSTRUCTION IN 

THE ELEMENT \R^ s( HOOL 6 sem hrs 

Curriculum Study, methods and practices in the language arts, and social studies In- 
cludes educational media 

Prerequisite: 6 s<-m. hrs. m mathematics 

62.396 MATHEMATH S M>R IMF VOl \(. ( Mil D 3 sem. hrs. 
An BCtivhies-centered course designed tor the teachers of children to age nine 

quisite: 53.201 and 53.202 arc required. 

62.398 Mi i hods v\D MATERIALS IN MATHEMATICS 

IN llll ELEMEN1 \m s( HOOI 3 sem. hrs. 

Mathematical methods, materials, understandings and attitudes essential in the teach- 
ing c4 contemporar) programs in the elementary school 
< m. hrs m mathematU t. 

62.401 STUDENT TEACHING IN ELEMENTARY \M) 

) \RI N ( MM DHOOD EDI ( X1ION 12 sem. hrs. 

hedtlled On I full semester basis with a minimum oi 30 hours per week. Opportu- 
nities for direct participating experiences are provided. Students are placed in classrooms 
with carefully selected cooperating teachers I he ma|or(si of the students determine one of 



I l EMI N i \n\ I in < \ I ION ( Ol RSI s \K} 

the following assignments: K-6: One experience in a primary division and one experience in 
an intermediate division ol a public school. 

N-K.-3: One experience in a preschool situation and one in a primary division ol a 
public school or two experiences in a primary division of a public school. One experience in 
a preschool situation or primary division of a public school and one experience in an 
intermediate division. 

62.410 WORKSHOP IN PRESCHOOL EDUCATION 3 sem. hrs. 

A course designed to provide teachers from Infant-Day-Care Centers and Nursery 
Schools with methods and materials that they can construct and utilize within their centers 
and classrooms. Theories of Bruner, Piaget, Froebel and Montessori will be examined. 

62.411 PROFESSIONAL SEMINAR: ELEMENTARY AND 

EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION 3 sem. hrs. 

Designed for Elementary student teachers. Includes references to School Law, 

Professional Ethics and current education research. Scheduled concurrently with Student 
Teaching. 



62.431 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 

Consent of the Department Chairperson required. 



3 sem. hrs. 



62.432 SOCIAL STUDIES IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 3 sem. hrs. 

Current objectives, methods and materials in the area of Social Studies in the ele- 
mentary school. Psychological and sociological needs of children as they are related to the 
development of a social studies program in the modern school. 

62.433 COMMUNICATIVE ARTS IN EARLY CHILDHOOD 3 sem. hrs. 

Introduction to the subjects called the language arts. Problems, methods, techniques 
and materials related to instruction in the several branches of this area of the elementary 
school curriculum. 

62.441 ELEMENTARY EDUCATION WORKSHOP 3 sem. hrs. 

Permits teachers in service to engage in individual or group study of classroom sub- 
jects or problems of interest or concern to them in their teaching. 



62.480 STUDY OF DISCIPLINE IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 3 sem. hrs. 

Designed specifically for prospective elementary teachers of junior level and above, 
emphasizing techniques designed to modify behavior in a positive way and the changing of 
wrong assumptions. This course may also be elected by teachers-in-service desiring to up- 
date and improve their skills of classroom control. 



184 [ 1)1 ( MIOSM Sll Mils \\|> SlKVH is Col Ks|s 

EDUCATIONAL STUDIES AND SERVICES 

FACULTY 

Professora H M Afshar, Nancj Gilgannon, Howard K Macauley, Jr. Robert C. Miller, 
Raj C Rod (Chairperson), David E. Washburn, Matthew Zoppetti; Associate Profc^ 
Assistant ProfeMOI James M Neisuender. 

Although it offers no major degree programs, the Department of Educational Stti 
and Services provides academic support services for all teacher education pragrm 
the Cooperative Reserve Officers Training Corps programs and the L'pward Bound 
Program are administered by this department. 



COURSE DESCR/PT/O \ S 
(Code 60) 

Courses marked + may be used toward General Education. 

60.101 THE SCHOOL IN CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN SOCIETY 3 sem. hrs. 

American education is analyzed in terms of its interaction with other institutions 
within the social order. E)esigned as a General Education course for arts and science 
students. 

60.201 CAREER DEVELOPMENT AND LIFE PLANNING + 3 sem. hrs. 

The exploration of career theories as they relate to a student's value system. Careers 
are studied as a developmental process which includes decision making, goal setting and life 
planning. 

60.301 EDI CATION MEASUREMENTS AND EVALUATION 3 sem. hrs. 

A comprehensive study of communicative media. Laboratory sessions in use of 
audio-visual materials in education. 
Prerequisite: 60.393. 

60.311 EDUCATIONAL MEASUREMENTS AND EVALUATION 3 sem. hrs. 

Principles of evaluation; grading; representative standardized tests; v oca hii la rv of 

measurement, test construction. 

60.391 LEARNING AND THE LEARNER + 3 sem hrs 

Psychological foundations of education: individual differences; learning theories ap- 
plies to classroom situations; physical and mental growth; personality development and 
mental hvgiene. 

60.392 HISTORICAL AND INTELLECT! U FOUNDATIONS 

OF \MIRK \\ EDI ( MION 3 sem. hrs. 

Development Oi American education in the perspective of historv 

60.393 SOCIAL FOUNDATIONS OF EDUCATION 1 3 sem. hrs. 
social processei underlying education: current social forces; the place of the school 

ID American culture, impact ot social stratification, role of the teacher in I period of rapid 
SOCtal chaniic. 

quisite. Junior Standing 
MJM EDUCATION IN URBAN SOCIETY t 3 sem. hrs. 

A Stud) ot formal education which serves areas in the United States with high popu- 
lation densities and the social faCtOfl which influence education in these settings. This 
course fultills the Social Foundations requirements for certification. 



ROTC 183 

60.395 EDUCATION IN RURAL SOCIETY | 3 sem. hrs. 

A study of formal education which serves areas in the United States with low popu- 
lation densities and the social factors which influence education in these communities. I his 
course fulfills the Social Foundations requirement for certification. 

60.421 CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT t 3 sem. hrs. 

Current curricular offerings of elementary and secondary schools. Emphasis upon 
philosophical, social, political and technical trends in the community, nation, and the world, 
and their effect upon the role of the teacher and the school in curriculum development. 

60.431 INDEPENDENT STUDY t 1-3 sem. hrs. 

Admission only with consent of the department chairperson. 

60.440 WORKSHOP IN EDUCATIONAL MEDIA 1-6 sem. hrs. 

Study of selected topical areas as related to media technique skills, and programs. 
May include research by individual students. 

60.441 WORKSHOP IN EDUCATION 1-6 sem. hrs. 

Study of selected areas in elementary or secondary education including research by 
individual students in a special teaching field. 

60.451 PUPIL PERSONNEL SERVICES IN THE PUBLIC SCHOOL 3 sem. hrs. 

A comprehensive study of pupil personnel services in elementary and secondary 
schools: school attendance, school health programs, pupil transportation, psychological 
services, guidance services. 

Air Force ROTC 

Bloomsburg State College participates with Wilkes College in a program 
which allows students to qualify for commissions in the United States Air Force 
upon graduation. 

The Air Force ROTC (AFROTC) provides a four-year program divided 
into the general military course (GMC) in the first two years and the Professional 
Officer Course (POC) in the last two years. A student may elect to enroll in 
either the total four-year program or the POC. Students in the four-year program 
take the GMC during the freshman and sophomore years and the POC during 
the Junior and Senior years, attending four weeks of field training during the 
summer between the Sophomore and Junior years. 

Members of the program are eligible to compete for AFROTC 
Scholarships. 

For acceptance into the POC, the four-year program student must pass a 
physical examination and an Officer Qualification Test and must have attained an 
acceptable academic rating. 

To qualify for direct entrance in the two-year POC program, students must 
have two academic years remaining at either the graduate or undergraduate level 
or a combination of the two. They must meet the physical standards, pass an Of- 
ficer Qualification Test, have an acceptable academic rating and must successfully 
complete a six week field training course. Transfer students may elect the POC if 
they satisfy the above requirements. 

Uniforms, equipment, and textbooks for the AFROTC work are supplied 
by Wilkes College and the United States Air Force. Students in the POC receive 
$100.00 per month subsistence allowance. In addition, a limited number of 
scholarships are available to students in the program on a competitive basis. 

Students who complete successfully the POC are commissioned as Second 
Lieutenants in the United States Air Force Reserve. They serve on active duty in 
the Air Force in a specialty as close as feasible to their academic training and 
consistent with Air Force needs. 

Four semester hours of credit may be earned in the GMC and 12 semester 
hours in the POC. 



186 KOK ( CM ksis 

arses ottered during the academic year are conducted at Wilkes College. 

I he field training required before entry into the POC is held at several 
operational bases each summer. Cadets have opportunity to observe, fly. and live 
with career personnel. I ransportation from the legal residence of the Cadet to the 
held training base and return, tood. lodging, and medical and dental care are pro- 
vided bv the Air Force. The Cadet receives approximately $300.00 for the four- 
week field training or S450.00 for the six-week training period. 

The Department of Aerospace Studies at Wilkes College conducts a 
number of field trips to Air Force Installations. The trips include tours of the 
base and familiarization flights. 

There is a flight instruction program, designed for Cadets in the POC who 
propose to enter Air Force Pilot training upon graduation, which identifies appli- 
cants who possess the qualifications necessary to fly high performance aircraft. 
The program consists of a ground phase given by officers of the detachment, and 
a flying phase with dual and solo flight instruction by a certified civilian flying 
school at government expense. 

Corps Training 

AFROTC cadets must participate in Corps Training one hour per week 
during each semester. This program involves a progression of experience designed 
to develop each student's leadership potential in a supervised training laboratory. 
Areas examined: Air Force customs and courtesies; drill and ceremonies, career 
opportunities, life and work of an Air Force junior officer. 

Held Training 

Candidates for enrollment in the POC will attend AFROTC field training 
during one summer. The training, conducted at selected Air Force bases, gives 
students an opportunity to observe Air Force units and people at work and at 
home, participate in marksmanship, survival, athletics, leadership training 
activities, take aircraft orientation flights, and work with contemporaries from 
other states. Students in the four-year program attend a four-week session while 
candidates for the two-year program must complete a six-week program. 

AEROSPACE STUDIES 

(Code 61) 

GENERAL MILITARY COURSES 

The General Military Courses (GMC) constitute a two-vear program for freshmen 
and sophomores designed to provide general knowledge of the role, organization 
and historical development of U.S. air power. Stuilcnts enrolled in the GMC who j- ( 
011 Air force siholarships incur no military obligations. 

( >>.nJ|utant Instructors in Aerospace Studies: I t. Col. Anthonv W Sci/vs. Capt Robert C 
Jennings, (apt Kenneth I. Johnson Coordinator Dr. Rav C Rost 

61.110 VS. MILITARY FORCES IN THE CONTEMPORARY WORLD I lvem.hr. 
Background, missions, and function! ol U.S military (bices, with emphasis on I s 
\n \ orce organization, doctrine, and itiategic forces 

61.120 I s miiiivrn FORCES IN INK CONTEMPORARY WORLD isem.hr. 
i s general purpose nuhtarv forces; insurgencj and counter-insurgency; aerospace 
support forces end orgunzationa 

61.210 THE DEVELOPMENT OF AIR POWER I isem.hr. 

\ir power development in historical perspective through the end ol World War II; 
evolution Ol missions, concepts, doctrine. .\nci employment, with emphasis on changes in 

conflict and factors which have prompted technological developments 



ROM COUKSBS 1X7 

61.220 THE DEVELOPMENT OF AIR POWER II 1 sem. hr. 

Air power development from the end of World War II to the present; changing 
missions and employment of air power in support of national objectives. 
Prerequisite: 61.210. 

PROFESSIONAL OFFICER COURSES 

The Professional Officer Courses (POC) constitute a four-semester program, nor- 
mally taken during the junior and senior years, mandatorily leading to commissioning as an 
Air Force officer. The POC concentrates on national defense policy, concepts and practices 
of management, and concepts and practices of leadership. 

61.310 CONCEPTS OF MANAGEMENT 3 sem. hrs. 

The role and functions of the professional military officer in a democratic society, 
and civil-military interaction; basic framework of defense policy and formulation of defense 
strategy; development of individual communicative skills. 
Prerequisite: POC membership or permission of the instructor. 

61.320 CONCEPTS OF LEADERSHIP 3 sem. hrs. 

The problems of developing defense strategy in a rapidly changing technological en- 
vironment; effective deterrent posture and management of conflict; dynamics and agencies 
of defense policymaking analyzed through case studies. 
Prerequisite: 61.310 or permission of instructor. 

61.410 NATIONAL SECURITY FORCES IN AMERICAN SOCIETY I 3 sem. hrs. 

General theory and practice of management with special reference to the Air Force; 
study of information systems, quantitative approach to decision making, and resource con- 
trol techniques; development of communicative skills. 
Prerequisite: 61.320 or permission of the instructor. 

61.420 NATIONAL SECURITY FORCES IN AMERICAN SOCIETY II 3 sem. hrs. 

Air Force leadership at the junior officer level, including its theoretical, professional, 
and legal aspects; practical experience in influencing people, individually and in groups, to 
accomplish organizational missions effectively; development of communicative skills. 
Prerequisite: 61.410 or permission of the instructor. 

Army ROTC 

Bloomsburg State College participates with the Bucknell University in a 
cross-enrollment program which allows students to qualify for a commission in 
the U.S. Army upon graduation. 

Army ROTC is a four-year experience open to men and women. It is di- 
vidied into a basic program of four courses given during the Freshman and 
Sophomore years and the advanced program of four courses given during the 
Junior and Senior years. (The Director of Military Science can authorize a waiver 
of basic course requirements for a student who has prior active military service or 
who has completed high school level ROTC.) No service obligation is incurred 
until the beginning of the advanced program. 

A special program, available to selected students who were unable to take 
the basic courses, permits them to enroll in the advanced courses after completing 
a basic summer camp between the Sophomore and Junior years. Students who 
attend the basic summer camp are paid at a rate equivalent to the basic pay for a 
private together with travel allowance, subsistence, housing, uniforms and medical 
care. 

Students enrolled in the advanced courses receive subsistence pay of 
$100.00 a month for not to exceed ten months a year. Successful completion of 
the advanced program requires attendance at an advanced summer camp, nor- 
mally scheduled between the Junior and Senior years; payment during this camp 



181 kok C6u*sb 

is at a rate equivalent to one-half of the basic pay for a Second Lieutenant with 
less than two vears ot service together with a travel allowance, subsistence, hous- 
ing, uniforms and medical care. 

Students who complete the advanced program successfully qualify upon 
graduation for a commission as Second Lieutenant in the United States Army 
and incur a service obligation in the Army with active duty requirements that 
vary with the type of commission accepted. 

A physical examination conducted by a medical doctor verifying the 
physical fitness of the student is required prior to acceptance into the ROTC 
program. 

MILITARY S( IK\( 1 

( . adjutant Instructors in Military Science: Lt. Col. John Wilson. Maj. Douglas Barr. Capt. 
Fred Dulder, Capt. Paul Passaro, Capt. Judy Hanna, Sgt. Maj. Jack Connor, E8 Jonnie 
Mollis. Coordinator: Dr. Ray C. Rost. 

ARMY ROTC 

(Code 67) 

BASIC PROGRAM 

(Freshman and Sophomore Years) 

67.110 INTRODUCTION TO MILITARY SCIENCE lsem.hr. 

The military as a profession. Organization of the army with emphasis on career op- 
portunities for ROTC graduates. Introduction to basic soldiering techniques, military 
weapons, and equipment. 

67.120 INTRODl CTION TO TACTICS/MILITARY ISSUES 1 s«m. hr. 

Functions and responsibilities of a leader within the smallest element of the Army. 
Principles of military estimates and orders. Tactical concepts and principles applied to a 
small unit. 

67.210 APPLIED LEADERSHIP AND MANAGEMENT I 1 sem. hr. 

Fundamentals of educational psychology applicable to militarv instruction, tech- 
niques used in planning, presenting and evaluating instruction, land navigation procedures 
including use of maps, aerial photographs, and other topographic information. 

67.220 APPLIED LEADERSHIP AND M V\ \(.f MKNT II 1 **m. hr. 

I he functions and responsihilities of leaders at the platoon level o\ command. 
Platoon level tactical concepts and principles Continued development o\ leadership through 

practical exercii 

67.230 KOK B \M( CAMP 4 sem. hrs. 

Sophomore Summer Semester 

( I his course is oltered in lieu of the Freshman and Sophomore courses for transfer 
students and other students who entet the program Si the Junior level.) 

\D\ \\( I D PROGR W1 

(Junior and Senior Years i 

67.311 IDVANCED MILITARY SCIENCE I 3 »em. hrs. 

\nal\sis ot the leader\ role in directing the efforts o\ individual and small units dur- 
ing militarv operations to include militarv geography, weapons lystems, communications, 
and intelligence gathering \rm\ structure within the Division 

67J20 fcDVANCED MIIII\R\ SCIENCE II 3 sem. hrs 

Delegation ot authoruv and responsibility, span ol control, planning, coordinating 
and decision making procedures Analvsis o\ militarv problems and leadership situations. 



ROTC COI USES IH9 

and the preparation and delivery of logical solutions. (During this semester, Students are re- 
quired to participate in a pre-camp orientation program ol physical and mental preparation 
for the rigors of advanced camp training and testing.) 



67.330 ROTC ADVANCED C AMP 
Junior Summer Semester 



6 sem. hrs. 



67.410 SEMINAR IN LEADERSHIP AND MANAGEMENT 3 sem. hrs. 

Military Law and its relationship to the civil government structure. The position of 
the United States in the contemporary world scene and its impact on military leadership 
and management problems. Management planning within the Cadet Corps organization. 

67.420 THEORY AND DYNAMICS OF THE MILITARY TEAM 3 sem. hrs. 

Analysis of military leadership and management problems; application of leadership 
principles with practical experience via a teaching practicum. Responsibilities of an officer 
on active duty. 




|C)<) Nl KMM. 

NURSING 

FACULTY 

Professor Gertrude M>nn; Associate Professon Lon HecJunan, Lauretl ^am 

Professon Mar> Carl. Joan M C ollins. I ucillc Oamhardella. Sandra Goodting, Julia 

Morgan. Winifred Kaehnick, Ann Kresovich, Caroline LeManc, Nancy K Ms 

Nicrlc. Marie Parnell. Lob /ong; Instructors Maureen Hare. Dorette Welk. 

Purpose: 

I"he purpose of the program is to offer preparation to individuals to enter a 
career as a professional nurse. Emphasis is on assisting students to develop 
knowledge, attitudes and skills to become professional nurse practitioners who 

are generalists and who can assume increasing responsibilities for: 
I. maintenance and promotion of health. 
2 assessment and nursing diagn* 

3. therapy, 

4. rehabilitation, and 

5. leadership roles within health care systems in a variety of settings 

Degree: 

Successful completion of the program leads to the degree. Bachelor of 
Science in Nursing (B.S.N.). After earning the baccalaureate degree, gradu. 
who are not registered nurses take the registered nurse examination for licensure 
bv a State Board of Nurse Examiners. 

Admission: 

Three categories of applicants mav be considered: recent high school 
graduates, transfer students, and registered nurses An individual who aspires to 
be admitted to the program must gain admission to the College (See Chapter 4 o\ 
this catalogue) and request admission to the Department o\ Nursing. The number 
ol applicants admitted to the program is limited to the number of clinical labora- 
tory places available. 

Applicants for admission to the nursing program must be in good health 
and have yearly physical examinations as well as specific diagnostic tests and im- 
munizations 

The Degree Program: 

Hie program combines courses on the campus and clinical practice in 
patient care areas in selected health agencies; with the guidance o\ nursing 
students provided bv the lacultv o\ the Department o\ Nursing o\ the College 

Hie course requirements tor the degree comprise: 

\. (.eneral Requirements: (Sec Section 6.4 of this catalogue Notl \ number o\ the 
prescribed courses in physical sciences and social sciences listed in the Specialization 
ma) also be applied bv the student toward Croups II and 111 of the General Fduca- 
tion Requirements Students are encouraged to elect courses in such disciplu.. 
anthropology, education, philosophy, and foreign language (in particular. Spanish). 

B. Specialization: Biolog) S 174; Chcm.str\ 52 101. 113. 108; Psychology: 

4s |()|, 211. .ind 3 semester hours elective under advisement. Sociologv 45 211. 213; 
Nllisin| S2 20I. 202. 301, 302, 303, ^04. 306, 401, 402. 404 Statistics One three 
semester hour coir | 

( . Free electees: I rec elective courses are required if necessar\ to complete the 
minimum graduation requirement ot 128 semester hours 



\i RSING l l >l 



Retention: 

Supplementing the retention standards of the College (Sections 5.05 and 
5.06), students in the nursing program must maintain a Q. PA. of at least 2.0. Be- 
cause of the nature of nursing, the nursing faculty reserves the right to retain only 
those students who, in its judgement, satisfy the requirements of scholarship, 
health, and personal suitability for nursing. 

Sequence: 

A suggested four-year sequence of the above requirements, planned for op- 
timum systematic growth and development of students who enter the program 
directly from high-school graduation, is as follows: 



FRESHMAN YEAR 

Fall sem. hrs. 

50.173 Anatomy and Physiology 3 

20. Freshman English 3 

52.101 Introductory Chemistry 3 

52.113 Chemistry Laboratory 2 

48.101 General Psychology 3 

05. Physical Education 1 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

82.201 Nursing Science 1 1-12 

48.211 Child Psychology 3 

45.211 Principles of Sociology 3 

JUNIOR YEAR 

82.301 Advanced Nursing Science 1 1-8 

Statistics.: 3 

82.303 Pathophysiology 3 

Elective 3 

05. Physical Education 1 

SENIOR YEAR 

82.401 Community Health 

Nursing 1-12 

Electives 6 



Spring sem. hrs. 

50.174 Anatomy and Physiology 3 

20. English 3 

50.342 Medical Microbiology 3 

48. Psychology Elective 3 

52.108 Physiological Chemistry 4 

05. Physical Education 1 

82.202 Nursing Science II 1-12 

45.213 Contemporary Social 

Problems 3 

Elective 3 

82.302 Advanced Nursing Science II 1-8 

82.304 Psychopathology 3 

82.306 Methods of Inquiry 3 

Elective 3 

05. Physical Education 1 

82.402 Independent Project 3 

82.404 Nursing Seminar 3 

Electives 6 



Miscellaneous: 

Students must supply their own transportation to clinical laboratory 
experiences. Uniforms, a sweep-second wrist watch, a stethoscope and such other 
equipment and supplies as may be required must be provided at student expense. 
Textbooks are apt to be more expensive than for many college programs. 

NURSING 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

(Code 82) 

82.201 NURSING SCIENCE I 2-12 sem. hrs. 

To orient the student to the theory and techniques needed to assist children and 
adults in preventing illness and restoring health. The course comprises six interdependent 
modules: 



192 Nl kms(. 




Module 1 


1 >mmunieation 


11 


Nursing CoDCeptl 


ill 


Basic Nursing lechniques 


IV 


Intro, to Clinical Nursing Practice 


V 


Nutrition 


VI 


Pharmacology 



Ihcory. 8 hrs. per week; Clinical Practice, 10 hours; Techniques laboratory . 2 hrs 
Fall. 
Prerequisites: 50.173, 174. 342; 52.101. 113. 108; 48.211 (or concurrent). 

82.202 Nl RSIM. SCIENCE II 2-12 sem. hrs. 
To increase knowledge and skills relative to the care of children and adults in the 

prevention of disease and the restoration of health. The course is divided into six modules: 

Module: I Disturbances of Fluid and Electrolyte Balance 

II Oxygenation and Transportation Difficulties 

HI Disorders of Cellular Growth and Body Defenses Against Injury 

IV Disorders of Emotional Equilibrium 

V Disturbances in Neural Regulations 

VI Disturbances in Chemical Regulation 

Theory, 8 hrs. per week; Clinical Practice, 10 hrs.; Techniques Laboratory, 2 hrs. 
Prerequisite: 82.201. 

82.203 INTRODUCTION TO NUTRITION 3 sem. hrs. 

Designed to introduce students in education, communication disorders, health and 
athletics, allied health science to concepts of nutritional needs for optimal growth and 
development throughout the aging process (conception to death), of food marketing, in in- 
fluences in food selection, and in nutrition policy. Methods of integrating Nutrition Educa- 
tion into various curriculums and various settings will be introduced. 

82.301 ADVANCED Nl USING SCIENCE I 2-8 sem. hrv 

To develop knowledge and skills in the application of sociological, psychological, 

and physiological principles in the treatment of patients in ambulators, acute, and chronic 
care settings throughout the age cycles. The course is divided into five modules. 

Module: I Physical Assessment 

II Health Care 

III Emergency Care 

IV Intensive Care 

V Care of Chronic Patients 

rbeory, 4 hrs per week; Clinical Practice, 8 hrs.; Fall ami Spring 
Prerequisites: 82.201, 202; or concurrently 82:303. 

82.302 ADVANCED NURSING SCIENCE II 2-8 sem. hrs. 
1*0 increase competence in functioning as a professional nurse, and in a colic.. 

relationship with other health care workers, with emphasis on r cip O PJCI to distress in 
Variom care settings throughout the age cycle. The course is diuded into five modules 

Module: I Mental Assessment 

II I he Communit\ as a Iherapeutic Modality 

III Individual Thcrap> 

i\ (iroup rherap) 

V I imiK I herapy 

rbeory, 4 hrs per week, Clinical Practice. S hrs.; Fall ami S;- 
Prereq . f concurr, ■ 



\i USING 193 

82.303 PATHOPHYSIOLOGY 3 MB, hrs. 

To apply physiological principles as a means of understanding pathological clinical 
conditions. Theory 3 hrs. per week; Fall and Spring. 

82.304 PSYCHOPATHOLOGY 3 sem. hrs. 

To examine theories of mental illness with emphasis on prevention, research, and 
current treatment modalities. Opportunity is provided for student involvement in various 
treatment modalities. Theory, 3 hours per week, Laboratory 16 hours. Fall and Spring. 
Prerequisites: 82:201 and 82:202. 

82.305 EMOTIONAL ASPECTS OF PATIENT CARE 3 sem. hrs. 

An opportunity to explore common emotional responses of patients in non-psy- 
chiatric settings. 

82.306 METHODS OF INQUIRY 3 sem. hrs. 

To orient the student to the research process including considerations of such con- 
cepts as variables, operational definition, sampling processes, types of research design, me- 
thodological approaches, and utilization of basic statistical data. Theory 3 hours per week. 
Spring. 
Prerequisites: Statistics 

82.307 GERIATRIC NURSING 3 sem. hrs. 

An elective course which focuses on the physiological and social aspects of aging, 
with emphasis on the assessment of problems and appropriate nursing intervention. 

82.308 PSYCHO-THERAPEUTIC NURSING INTERVENTION 3 sem. hrs. 

Primarily for nurses working with emotionally ill persons. The focus is on the assess- 
ment of the patient's emotional status and guidelines for appropriate intervention. 

82.309 EPIDEMIOLOGY 3 sem. hrs. 

Focus is on studies of common epidemiological problems, with emphasis on the 
epidemiologic method of inquiry. 

82.310 PHYSIOLOGICAL PRINCIPLES IN 

CLINICAL NURSING PRACTICE 3 sem. hrs. 

Designed to review functional anatomy and physiological principles as they relate to 
problems encountered in clinical nursing practice. 
Prerequisite: restricted to registered nurses. 

82.401 COMMUNITY HEALTH NURSING 3-12 sem. hrs. 

To increase the students' knowledge through the application of concepts from a va- 
riety of scientific disciplines as a basis for understanding the dynamic interaction of indi- 
vidual and group values, reactions, and action behaviors in health-illness situations and 
other societal structures as they affect persons; levels of health and the provision of health 
care in the community setting, using a family-centered approach. The course consists of 
four modules: 

Module: I Health System Models 

II Epidemiology 

III Primary Nursing 

IV Cultural Assessment 

Limited to B.S.N, students. Theory, 4 hrs. per week; Clinical Practice, 16 hours. Fall 
or Spring. 
Prerequisites: 82.301, 302, 303, 304. 



I l M N I Ks|\< , 

82.402 INDEPENDENT PROJECT] Wm. hrv 

In provide an opportunitv lor the student to investigate a clinical nursing or health 
problem independent!) with the guidance of | !acult> member, using a scientific investiga- 
tive approach I imited 10 H S.Y students I heorv 3 hours per week Fall or Spring. 
Prerequisites 48.260 or 45.460; 82J01, 302 

him)} CURRENT ISSUES IN NURSING PRACTICE SitmtaB. 

\ study ol current issues and developments in nursing and their implications for the 
future of the profession. 

fuisite: restricted to registered nurses. 

82.404 NURSING SEMINAR * sem. hrv 

To explore the nature of protessionali/ation as it occurs in societv. with particular 
reference to the health care system. Current issues, trends, political action and a admin 
tive dimensions in nursing are explored. Theory. 3 hours per week Fall or Spring. 

82.405 INDEPENDENT STUDY NURSING 1-6 sem. hrv 

An investigation of an area of special interest and value to the student, under the di- 
rection of a faculty member, following a plan approved in advance by the department chair- 
person Mav be partly interdisciplinary. 

82.406 SURVEY OF PROFESSIONAL NURSING 3 sem. hrv 

I his nursing elective course is divided into five nine-hour modules which focus on 
maternal and child health, medical, surgical and psychiatric nursing. It surveys the broad 
range of nursing and acts as an integrating stimulus prior to Board examinations. Ma> be 
taken on a pass fail basis. 




\\ ^4 



Sic ONDAm I -Ml I \l ION IMS 



SECONDARY EDUCATION 

FACULTY: 

Professor Raymond E. Babineau; Associate Professors Glenn A. Good, Martin M. Keller, 
Milton Levin, A.J. McDonnell (Chairperson). 

SECONDARY EDUCATION CURRICULUM 

The secondary Education curriculum is planned to offer academic, cultural and 
professional experience significant to the personal and professional competence of a begin- 
ning teacher of a subject area in the secondary schools. 

The curriculum requirements comprise General Education, Professional Education 
and the Subject Area Specialization, as follows: 

A. General Education (Section 6.4) 

B. Professional Education. (See course descriptions for prerequisites of these 
courses.) 

60.393 — Social Foundations of Education 3 sem. hrs. 
60.391 — Learning and the Learner 

*60.301 — Educational Media 2 sem. hrs. 

*65.396 — Curriculum and Instruction 4 sem. hrs. 
*65.351 to 360 (Appropriate subject matter 

methods course) 3 sem. hrs. 

**65.402 — Student Teaching 12 sem. hrs. 
**65.374 — Teaching of Reading in the Academic 

Subjects 3 sem. hrs. 

♦These three courses must be scheduled concurrently. 
**These two courses must be scheduled concurrently. 

C. Area of Specialization. Each major (or area of specialization) is designed to 
develop scholarship basic to teaching the subject and, to a degree governed by the 
limits of time and the discrimination of the subject in choosing electives, basic to 
graduate study. The requirements for each area of specialization follow. 

D. Free electives if necessary to complete the minimum graduation requirement of 
128 semester hours. 

Areas of Specialization 
in Secondary Education 

BIOLOGY 

Biology: 50.210, 220, 332, 351, 380; 

Chemistry: 52.101 and/or 102; 113; 52.211, 233; 

Mathematics: 53.141; 

Fifteen semester hours elective in Biology, including 3 semester hours in field courses 

in addition to 50.351. 
Physics is recommended — students who plan to enter graduate study should take 

both 54.111 and 54.112. 

CHEMISTRY 

Chemistry: 52.102, 113, 122, 231, 232, 311, 312, 490; 
Physics: 54.211, 212; 

Mathematics: 53.125, 126; 53.171 or 172; 53.225; 
Biology: 50.101, 111; or 50.210 or 50.220. 



ONDAM EDI < MION 



( OMMl M( MION 



I he requirements tor the certificate in Communication comprise 27 semester h 
in core courses; 15 semester hours in one of five emphasis options; three semester hours in 
each of three of the remaining four emphasis options (Total. 51 semester hou- 

( ore ( ourses 

English: 20.302 

one course from 20.120, 121, 220. 221. 222. 223; 

one course from 20.360, 361, 362. 363. 

one course from 20.3 II, 312. 411; 

Speech and Theatre: 25.103 or 104; 25.206 or 241; 25.205 or 215; 26 208 or 209; 

27.225 or 231 
( lotal core courses. 27 semester hours.) 

Emphasis Options 
Speech option: 

15 semester hours elected from any Code 25 courses not listed in the core. 

Theatre option: 

15 semester hours elected from any Code 26 courses not listed in the core. 

Non-Print Media option: 

15 semester hours elected from any Code 27 courses not listed in the core. 

Literature option: 

20.251; 20.352; 

one author course: 334, 336-8, 363, 381, 383, 482; 

one genre course: 153, 280, 360. 361, 362, 370, 372, 373, 374. 380. 442. 

one period course: 332. 333. 341. 342. 343. 344. 345 

Writing language option: 

Five courses elected from 20.105, 111. 205, 255, 301. 304. 305. 31 I. 312. 41 1 

EARTH AND SPACE S( If N( f 

Mathematics: Two courses selected from 53.1 13, 53.123. 53.141, 53 125. 53.126; 
Physics: 54.111; 

Chemistry: 52.102. 113; 

Physics: 54.112 or one additional Chemistr> course; 

Earth Science: 51.101, 2! IS9\ plus 4 additional courses from 51.102. 105. 361, 

355. 362. 365. 369. 370. 451. 455. 46>V 475 and selected courses from Marine 

Science Consortium 
Maximum of 9 semester hours from Marine Science Consortium mas he applied 

towards requirements lor the major 

ENG1 ISH 

..ish 2t> 120 or 121. 
. .sh 20.220 or 221. 

1 ngtish 2o 222 or 223; 

One additional course Irom iboVC groups, not ptevioUSfj taken; 
1 nghsh 20 102. 363; 
Irtish 2 80.311 or 20 411. 

12 semester hours m additional electee courses (300 Of 400 level) :n Fnglish. no 
more than one ol 20 301. MU. 

f RfN( H 

French 10 103, 104, 201, 202, 209; 10.211 or 212. 

12 semester hours dmded among cmli/ation. language and literature COU 
Students exempted trom 10.103 or an\ required coursc(s) \a ill suhstitute advanced 
elective courses in French 



Si < ONDAR> EDI < M l<)\ 197 



general science 



Biology: 50.101. 102, 111, 112 or 50.210, 220; 351; one course at 300 or 400 level 
Chemistry: 52.102, 113; 
Physics: 54.111, 112, or 54.211, 212; 
Earth Science: 51.101, 253, 255, 259; 
Mathematics: 53.111, 112; 

Elective courses, 1 1 semester hours minimum, from one or more of the areas of 
Biology, Earth Science, Physics, Chemistry, or Mathematics. 



GERMAN 

German: 11.103, 104, 201, 202, 211, 212; 

12 semester hours in German divided among literature, language and civilization 

courses. 
Students exempted from 11.103 or any required course(s) will substitute advanced 

elective courses in German. 



MATHEMATICS 

Mathematics: 53.125, 126; 171 or 172; 211, 225, 226, 231, 241; 

Twelve semester hours to be elected from 53.271, 281, 311, 314, 322, 331, 341, 371 

372, 373, 381, 41 1, 421, 422, 451, 461, 471, 472, 491, 492. 
Recommended courses: Physics 54.211, 212. 



PHYSICS 

Physics: 54.211, 212, 310, 311, 314, 400; 

6 semester hours chosen from Physics courses numbered higher than 54.212; 
Chemistry: 52.102, 113; 
Mathematics: 53.125, 126, 225, 322. 

Recommended courses: Biology 50.210, Earth Science 51.101, 253, Mathematics 
53.271, Physics 54.250. 



COMPREHENSIVE SOCIAL STUDIES 

The Social Studies Specialization requires 36 semester hours in prescribed core 
courses and the completion of one of seven specialization options. 

Core Courses 

Anthropology: 46.200; 

Economics: 40.211, 40.212; 

Geography: 41.101, 41.102; 

History: 42.112; 42.113; 42.208 or 121 or 122; 

Political Science: 44.101, 44.161; 

Sociology: 45.211; 

Psychology: 48.101. 

Specialization Options 

Social Problems— Economics 

Political Science 44.366 or Sociology 45.213; 

Economics 40.413, 40.422; 

12 semester hours elective in Economics. 



ONDAM I I" I MI"N 

Social Problems — Geograph) 

One course Irom Geographv 41.125, 253, 254. 256, Earth Science 51 101. 102 

One course Irom 41.213, 221, 258, 310, J2f J70, * 

One course Irom 41 321, 333, 343, 344. 345. 346, 347; 
') semester hours elective in Geography; 

mester hours elective in Economics, or Geography, or Sociologv or Political 
Science or HlStOI) 

Social Problems— History and Government 

One course in United States History; 

One course in European History; 

One course in history of non-western world; 

One course in United States government and politics 

One course in international or comparative politics 

6 semester hours elective in history or political science. 

Social Problems— Political Science 

18 semester hours distributed among four groups with at least three semester hours 
in each group: Political Theory and Methodology; American Government and 
Politics, Comparative Governments and Politics, International Politics, 

J semester hours elective in Economics or Sociology or History or Geography. 

Social Problems — Sociology /Anthropology 

General Anthropology 46.100 
Language and Culture 46.440 
Sociology 45.213, 45.315; 
Sociology 45.316 or 45.318; 
6 semester hours elective in Sociology. 

History 

History 42.398 

Minimum of one course from each of the following groups: Non-West. Europe. 
United States; six semester hours elective in History (31XM00 level); and 6 
semester hours elective in Social Sciences, apart from Historv 

SPANISH 

Spanish: 12.103, 104. 201. 202. 209; 210 or 21 I; 

12 semester hours divided among civilization, literature and language COU 
Students exempted from 12.103 or any required COUraefs) vvill substitute advanced 
elective courses in Spanish. 

COACHING 

I he following OOUnea are recommended to be elected bv students who expect to 
coach athletics in addition to leaching in their field ol specialization: Physical Education 
05.242, 05.409; one n two Courses from 05 251. 252. 253; two courses from 05 256. 259, 
I ompletion ol these courses docs not lead to certification 

( Ol RSI OESCRIPTtOh 
(Code 65) 

05.374 II V(IIIN(. OF READING IN kCADEMU SIB.IKIS 3 sem. hrs. 

Understanding and techniques tor developing reading skills applicable to the secon- 
daiv school Emphasis On readiness, comprehension, silent reading, and oral reading 
through secondaiv school academic SUDJCCtS 

Prerequisite: Secondary Education 65396, QPA as prescribed for 62,401. 



Sk ONDAH I Di < \lios CO! ksi s 199 

65.396 CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION IN 

THE SECONDARY SCHOOL 4 IMH. hrs. 

A competency based experience which involves significant pre-professional activities 
Broad areas of study include: secondary school curriculum, educational decision making, 
instructional planning, strategies and evaluation, classroom management and educational in- 
novation. The studies are complemented by an educational media laboratory experience and 
the Assistant Teacher Program which places the student in a working relationship with a 
local secondary school teacher. The student registers for 65.396 and the appropriate ac- 
companying course from the following list: (Each course carries 3 semester hours credit.) 

65.351— Teaching of English in the Secondary School 

65.352— Teaching of Mathematics in the Secondary School 

65.353— Teaching of Biological Science in the Secondary School 

65.354— Teaching of Physical Science in the Secondary School (Offered Spring 
Semester Only) 

65.355— Teaching of Social Studies in the Secondary School 

65.356— Teaching of Speech in the Secondary School (Offered Spring Semester 
Only) 

65.357— Teaching of Geography and Earth/ Space Science in the Secondary School 
(Offered Fall Semester Only) 

65.358— Teaching of Spanish in the Secondary School 

65.359— Teaching of French in the Secondary School 

65.360— Teaching of German in the Secondary School 

Prerequisite: Psychology 48.101; Education 60.391; Education 60.393; junior standing in one 
of the curricula in Secondary Education. 

65.402 STUDENT TEACHING IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL 12 sem. hrs. 

Students are assigned to public schools where they work with selected classroom 
teachers and college supervisors in teaching experiences. Students follow the same schedule 
and assume the same responsibilities as their cooperating teachers. Further information, 
including location of off-campus centers is given in Section 9.03.1. 
Prerequisite: Education 65.396, QPA as prescribed for 62.401. 

65.404 THE PROFESSIONAL SEMESTER IN BUSINESS EDUCATION 15 sem. hrs. 

The Professional Semester in Business includes three major activities: (a) a brief 
orientation experience to observe the operation of the school and of specific classes; (b) ap- 
proximately 8 weeks of participatory teaching activities, correlated with classroom studies, 
(c) an 8-week period of full-time supervised student teaching, and (d) a competency-based 
seminar in methods and the principles and problems of Business Education. Activities in 
seminar center on principles of education for business teachers, methods of teaching busi- 
ness subjects, and strategies and problems of classroom teaching. Classroom discussions are 
closely correlated with participatory teaching activities in the secondary school setting. 

65.411 SEMINAR IN SECONDARY EDUCATION 3 sem. hrs. 

Activities center around concerns and problems encountered in secondary education. 
The range of activities is determined by individual need and by levels of professional 
competency including diagnosis, mutual development of objectives, and self-evaluation. 

65.431 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN SECONDARY EDUCATION 1-3 sem. hrs. 

Consent of the Department Chairperson required. 

65.441 SECONDARY EDUCATION WORKSHOP 3-6 sem. hrs. 

Designed for both teachers in service and upper level undergraduates. Study of 
selected areas in secondary education. Individuals or group study of classroom subjects of 
interest or concern in teaching. 



200 Spb iai f i" < Mies 

SPECIAL EDUCATION 

FACULTY 

ProfetSOri William I Jones. Andrew .1 Karpinski (Chairperson). John M Mclaughlin. 
Ir . I mih A Rcuusaat. Margaret S Webber. Associate Pi M B Hill. Kenneth 

P. Hunt. Colleen J Marks. Carroll I Redfern, James T. Reifer; Assistant 
M Youihock 

Program Description: 

The Department of Special Education offers a certification program for 
teachers of Mentally Retarded and or Physically Handicapped children, an area 
of concentration for students in Elementary Education and the course- 
experiences which support these curricula. 

The Department of Special Education, located in Na\> Hall, is equipped 
with therapy rooms, television equipment and equipment and materials used in 
the training of exceptional children. 

Students enrolled in Special Education have the opportunity of participat- 
ing in practicum in supervised and graded special classes. After the completion of 
course work, students participate in full-time student teaching in Selinsgrove 
Center, Laurelton Center, and to public schools in Chester, Columbia, Lacka- 
wanna, Luzerne, Lycoming, Montgomery, Montour, Northampton, Northumber- 
land, Lehigh, Bucks, Snyder, Sullivan and Centre Counties. A special class 
conducted by Susquehanna Intermediate Unit provides opportunity for observa- 
tion and participation. 

Continued enrollment in the Special Education curriculum after the sopho- 
more year is limited to the number of students who can be accommodated in 
clinical practice during the junior and senior years. 

Sophomores who have been tentatively enrolled in the curriculum may ap- 
ply for continued enrollment as part of their application for admission to teacher 
education. If admitted to teacher education, selection for Special Education is 
made by the faculty of the Special Education department, assisted by representa- 
tive seniors, in the light of the applicant's academic performance and professional 
promise. 

Applicants who are not selected for Special Education should consult the 
coordinator of academic advisement concerning transfer to another curriculum. 
Ihe\ are, however, eligible to reapply lor Special Education during the DC 
lection period. 



(I RRIC1 II M FOR TEACHING MEN I VI M \M) OR 
PHVSK M I ^ HANDU \PPED 

\. (.eneral Education. (See Section 6.4) 

B. Vcademic Background Courses: Mathematics 53.201; Biolog) 50.101; PI 
Science 54.103; Speech 25.103; Plycholog) 48.101 And 4S2II; (Academic back- 
ground courses designated b\ the departments as applicable to the General Educa- 
tion requirements ma\ be elected in partial fulfillment ot that requirement.) 

(. Professional Education and related courses: 4s n or 60.391; 60.311; 

60.393; 62 302; 62 ; 'i 5.321. 

I). Specialization: 70.101; 70.200; 70,251; 70.250; 70.331, 70.332; 70J53; 70.350; 

-() IS I. ^0 4M. ^0 401 

I . DecthH Courses: 1! necessao to Complete the minimum ol 12S semester ho.. 

graduation. 



sn cia] I mi < \mo\ Courses 201 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 
(Code 70) 

70.101 INTRODUCTION TO SPECIAL EDUCATION + 3 sem. hrs. 

Deals with the characteristics and educational problems of, and programs for, excep- 
tional children; the mentally retarded, the mentally gifted, those with behavior problems, 
those with speech problems, the hearing and visually impaired, and the neurologically and 
nonsensory physically handicapped. Information pertinent to the history and philosophy of 
special education is also presented. 

70.200 INTRODUCTION TO MENTAL RETARDATION t 3 sem. hrs. 

Offers students an orientation to the nature of mental retardation; the etiology and 
types, and the behavioral and learning characteristics involved. Students will be exposed to 
such diverse areas as an historical survey of mental retardation, research in mental retarda- 
tion, community and state responsibility in relation to the mentally retarded, prevention and 
treatment of mental retardation, educational and recreational avenues for the mentally 
retarded and various facets of the relationship and reactions of the child and parent. 

70.231 LANGUAGE I 3 sem. hrs. 

Designed to aid the special class teacher m developing understanding of auding and 
speech processes, developmental and defective. Course content includes: introduction to the 
physiology of speech and hearing mechanisms; developmental stages of language acquisi- 
tion; etiological factors related to receptive and expressive deficits; and, techniques for 
developing listening and speaking skills by the classroom teacher. 
Prerequisite: 70.101 

70.250 BEHAVIOR DISORDERS f 3 sem. hrs. 
Deals with inappropriate behaviors emitted by students and the techniques and 

strategies that teachers may use to modify these behaviors. Some other areas covered are 
psychological disorders, research related to aggressive and withdrawn behavior, and the sub- 
jective nature of the social curriculum. Group and individual problems are examined at all 
levels of schooling. 
Prerequisite: 70.101 

70.251 LEARNING DISABILITIES 3 sem. hrs. 

The course is presented in three units, a general overview, the central nervous system 
and specific learning disabilities. Course content includes general information on learning 
problems, the medical model and specific language disorders and remediation. 
Prerequisite: 70.101 

70.253 METHODS AND MATERIALS FOR TEACHERS OF 

THE LOW FUNCTIONING MENTALLY RETARDED 3 sem. hrs. 

Designed to provide supervised student contact with low functioning mentally 
retarded/ multihandicapped individuals (LFMR). The student will design and implement 
educational experiences for LFMR and will build and use materials suitable to the abilities 
of the individuals with whom they work. The students will be exposed to methods and ma- 
terials appropriate to this segment of the MR population. 
Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing and 70.200. 

70.255 EXPERIENCE WITH EXCEPTIONAL CHILDREN 1-3 sem. hrs. 

Clinical or field experience working individually with exceptional children in various 
settings. 
Prerequisites: Junior or senior status and permission of instructor. 

70.256 THE MENTALLY GIFTED + 3 sem. hrs. 

The primary purpose of this course is to assist students to become familiar with 
physical, mental, emotional, and social characteristics of the mentally gifted and with types 



Spei i vi I Di < \iio\ ( 01 tm 

ol organization, teaching procedures and curricula! material used in the education of the 
mentall) gifted. In addition. famtlv relationships relevant to the education of gifted indi- 
viduals are explored. 

70.332 I \N(,t U»I II m. hrv 

Designed to aid the student in preparing to teach exceptional children basic and 
refined written language skills Course content includes methods and materials tor teaching 
penmanship, spelling, syntactical structure and reading. 
Prerequisite: Junior or senior status. 

70.350 METHODS K)R ELEMENT \m 

SPECIAL EDI ( \I1()\ 3 sem. hrv 

Fundamental principles for, and a variety of teaching techniques applicable to the 
range oi elementary levels of special education. Organization of programs, cumcular ap- 
proaches and materials for the special education teacher. 
Prerequisites: 70.101. 70.200. 70.250 and or 70.251. 

70.351 SECONDARY METHODS FOR SPECIAL EDI CATION 3 sem hrs. 
A student-centered workshop approach in analysis of methods, research, and philo- 
sophies currently in use in the teaching of Special Education students. Practice in the use of 
various teaching aids and machines related to student projects in secondary special classes. 
Prerequisite: Junior or senior status. 

70.353 ASSESSMENT AND PLANNING 3 sem hrs 

Designed to give the students information and experience with formal and informal 
assessment devices and procedures, their usages and appropriateness. It will cover gathering 
information about the learner prior to instruction concerning appropriate instructional 
tasks, sensory channels, interest areas, and social skills. Ways oi developing informal a^ 
ments, gathering observational information, storing information and planning for instruc- 
tion wall be covered. 
Prerequisite: Junior or senior status. 

70.357 PRE VOCATIONAL AND VOCATIONAL 

TRAINING FOR THE HANDICAPPED 3 sem hrs 

Develops a philosophy of Vocational Education for the mentally and or physically 
handicapped; knowledge of programs and strategies to develop their pre-\ocational and 
vocational skills; materials and assessment procedures appropriate for these students and 
programs 

70.375 INDIVIDUAL PROJECT I sem hrs 

Project planned according to interests and needs oi the individual student, in an> oi 
the following suggested areas: library research, curriculum studv. internship in l|X 
aspects o! educational programs 
I Open to luniors ami scmor.s only with staff approval. ) 

70.401 STUDEN1 rEACHING WITH EXCEPTIONA1 CHILDREN i: sem. hrs. 

Student teaching provides opportunities tor the student to test educational theor> b> 
putting it into practice; opportunities to raise questions, problems and issues which mav 
lead to advanced studv. and opportunities lor effective functioning, in a pupil-teacher rela- 
tionship in an actual classroom setting 
Prerequisite (ornurrent with 70.461 Senw: 

70.403 INTERIM TEACHING IN SPECIAJ EDUCATION 3^ sem. hrs. 

Supervised student leaching experience under the direction oi the professional staff 
in cooperation With local and state school divisions 1 he program is designed for those indi- 
viduals who have teaching certitication in fields of education other than Special Education. 
im tailored to student's need 



Sim i i y I Di < \i [ON ( ©I USES 203 

70.461 PROBLEMS IN SPECIAL EDUCATION 3 Mm. hrs. 

Instruction will be directed towards the development of constructive leaching ol ex- 
ceptional children. The course is devoted to problems in the education ol exceptional 
children. As each problem is identified, its relationship to teaching is discussed. I he course 
is designed to help the future teacher meet practical problems in guiding the exceptional in- 
dividual in their learning experiences at school. 
Prerequisite: Concurrent with 70.401. 

70.490-491-492 SPECIAL WORKSHOP 1-6 sem. hrs. 

Temporary special workshop seminars designed to focus on contemporary trends and 
problems in the field of Special Education. Lectures, resource speakers, team teaching, field 
experiences and practicum, news media and related techniques will be utilized. 

9.10 STUDENT AND COMMUNITY SERVICES IN THE 
SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIES 

Speech, Hearing and Language Clinic 

This clinic, located in Navy Hall, provides a number of services to students, 
faculty, staff and total community. Evaluative services available are: speech, 
voice, language, hearing, hearing aid evaluation, and educational-psychological 
services. Therapeutic services offered are speech and language therapy, auditory 
training, speech reading, educational therapy for the hearing impaired and parent 
counseling. Services of the clinic are free to Bloomsburg State College students, 
faculty and staff. 

Reading Clinic 

The Reading Clinic, located in Benjamin Franklin Hall, offers diagnostic 
evaluation of reading skills, including selected standardized reading tests, Lovell 
Hand-Eye Co-ordination test and tele-binocular examination. After evaluation, 
remedial clinical instruction is provided if desired, including parent counseling. 
This is a continuing year-round service for which a fee schedule is available upon 
request, but no person is denied service because of financial need. 

Speed Reading 

Beginning early in each semester, several sections of speed reading are of- 
fered to students on a "first come — first served" basis. Classes are limited to ten 
students. Announcements appear in the student newspaper. Classes usually are 
held two or three days a week for six weeks. 

Upward Bound 

The college presents the opportunity for tenth and eleventh grade students 
from participating high schools to enroll in the Upward Bound Program. The 
program, open to students meeting certain academic and financial eligibility re- 
quirements, is designed to assist these individuals by making them more self-con- 
fident, well informed, and better prepared for life beyond high school. The 
program consists of two segments. In the first segment, enrolled students spend 
two hours a week in their local high schools participating in academic experiences 
designed to supplement their regular scholastic program and to improve perfor- 
mance in the areas of English, reading, science, and mathematics. The program's 
counseling service provides close individual contact for discussing career, voca- 
tional and personal interests within the high school setting. The other component 
of Upward Bound is a six-week summer live-in experience on the college campus. 
This experience provides concentrated academic work, plus planned recreational, 
social, and cultural experiences both on and off campus. 






tfilf 



Shi* t 




Schooi <>i Extended Programs 205 

10. School Of Extended Programs 

10.1 ORGANIZATION AND FUNCTION 

The School of Extended Programs administers and coordinates college- 
wide efforts to provide life-long education opportunities for citizens of the 
Central Susquehanna Valley region. 

The school also facilitates and coordinates the operation of the offices of 
Cooperative Education, International Education, and Summer Sessions. 

10.2 PROGRAMS 

Non-Degree Credit Program 

On the assumption that learning should be a life-long process, a non-degree 
credit program provides for enrollment by an individual in regular undergraduate 
credit courses without formal admission to the College as a degree candidate. In- 
dividuals are invited to use this program as an opportunity to review skills, ac- 
quire new skills, or pursue cultural and intellectual interests. Credit courses may 
be chosen from both day and evening offerings of the college. 

College credit earned in appropriate courses taken as a non-degree student 
may be applied later if the individual seeks and is granted formal admission to a 
degree program in the college. Courses taken by non-degree students can also be 
used for certification programs and to meet undergraduate deficiencies for 
graduate study. (The School of Graduate Studies has its own non-degree regula- 
tions. See the Graduate Bulletin.) 

Non-Credit Mini- Courses 

Non-credit mini-courses provide opportunities for individuals to gain spe- 
cialized skills and /or information for career purposes or to pursue cultural, 
recreational, or special interests through short-term experiences without credit. 

These courses reflect expressed community needs and demands. A nominal 
hourly fee is charged. 

Attendance Fee Program 

The Attendance Fee Program allows individuals to attend college classes 
without credit. Admission on this basis depends upon available space and the 
payment of the fee of $25 per course. 

10.3 ADMISSION PROCEDURES FOR NON-DEGREE 

CREDIT STUDENTS 

Application blanks may be secured from the Dean of Extended Programs 
and are filed in the Office of Admissions. Supporting credentials are required as 
follows: 

(a) Adults who desire to enroll as part-time students must file documentary 
evidence of high school graduation or certification of high school equivalency. 

(b) A student enrolled in another institution of higher education who 
wishes to take courses at Bloomsburg State College for transfer to the home insti- 
tution must file a transcript from that institution. It is recommended that the ap- 
plicant make certain that course work pursued at Bloomsburg State College will 
be accepted by the home institution. 

(c) A student approaching the final year of high school who desires to com- 
bine college work with the last year of high school work must file a high school 
transcript, junior year SAT scores, a letter of recommendation from the high 



!<><<l 01 I \ II M>1 I) PlOGI 

school counselor, and letters ol recommendation from two high school instru^ 
in the academic area ol intended pursuit. Acceptance for admission requires 
concurrence bv the high school principal. 

(d) (iraduate students with undergraduate deficiencies must be recom- 
mended to the School of Extended Services by the dean of the School of 
(iraduate Studies to pursue such undergraduate courses as the graduate dean 
recommends. 

I An individual who wishes to pursue a remedial program to qualify for 
undergraduate degree admission must submit a high school transcript and an of- 
ficial accounting for all previous college attendance if any. 

(0 Students with an earned baccalaureate degree who wish to complete the 
requirements for Level I or Level II teacher's certification must submit a 
transcript from the institution that granted the baccalaureate degree and must be 
recommended to the School of Extended Services by the Dean of the School of 
Professional Studies. 

(g) Senior citizens who are retired, over 60 years of age, a legal resident of 
the U.S. and residing in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. Students in this 
category may be admitted to a class on a seat available basis only. 

10.4 ADMISSION TO MINI-COURSES AND 

ATTENDANCE FEE PROGRAMS 

Individuals who wish to take advantage of the mini-course and attendance 
fee programs are not required to file credentials; in most cases the only formality 
is that of registration for the course to be taken. 

10.5 ACADEMIC ADVISEMENT IN THE 

SCHOOL OF EXTENDED PROGRAMS 

Students who are taking work for teacher certification are assigned to 
academic advisers in the School of Professional Studies and must secure the 
signature of an adviser on the Non-degree Course Selection Form. Informal 
advisement of other students may be arranged through the Dean of the School of 
Extended Programs. 

10.6 SUMMER SESSIONS 

Undergraduate and graduate courses are offered in the summer sessions in 
both on-campus and off-campus locations. Students may schedule as man> 
semester hours in a session as the number of weeks in the session. An overload 
requires the approval of the appropriate school dean and the Dean of Extended 
Programs in keeping with the college policy on normal load and overload 

Undergraduate courses are open, without formal application, to regularly 
enrolled students of Bloomsburg State College who wish to enrich or accelerate 
their programs of Study or make up academic deficiencies. Others must applv for 
admission through the Office of Admissions. 

Students from other colleges are admitted to Summer Sessions upon the fil- 
ing ol a simplified application form supported by a letter -landing from 
the chief academic officer of the college regularly attended 

(iraduate courses arc ottered for students who wish to continue their educa- 
tion at the Master's degree level and or to qualify lor permanent certification. 
(See (iraduate Bulletin.) 

Special workshops are scheduled to provide teachers in service and other 
professional groups with specific training and in their professionals skills at times 
and locations convenient to their schedules and places ol employment. 

\ <:op\ of the Summer Sessions Bulletin (including both undergraduate and 
graduate courses) mav be obtained from the Dean of the School of Extended 



S( nooi <>i Extended Programs 207 

Programs. Application forms for undergraduate studies are included with the 
Bulletin; graduate students secure application forms from the Dean of Graduate 
Studies. 

10.7 INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION 

The International Education Program advises international students and 
coordinates college-wide efforts to provide multi-cultural experiences for students 
and faculty. Interested students may be provided student teaching experiences in 
foreign countries through this program. The Pennsylvania Consortium for 
International Education sponsors a center for study at Salzburg, Austria, each 
summer. 

Students interested in international education programs at Bloomsburg 
and/ or other colleges are referred to the Director of International Education. 

10.8 COOPERATIVE EDUCATION 

The cooperative Education Program provides opportunities for students to 
combine academic instruction on-campus with work experience off-campus. The 
program, which is optional to selected students according to the specific academic 
needs of their programs of study, includes internships, work-study programs, and 
the typical "co-op" experience. 

Several internships are available in the Department of Education in Har- 
risburg each semester. A student may apply for these experiences by contacting 
the Dean of Extended Programs. 



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Graduati Studies 209 



11. Graduate Studies 



11.1 DEGREES 

Graduate study was inaugurated in 1960 with programs leading to the 
Master of Education degree planned for teachers in service. In 1968, approval 
was granted to offer a program in history to lead to the Master of Arts degree 
and in 1971 a program in biology to lead to the Master of Science degree. Addi- 
tional programs to lead to the Master of Arts and Master of Science and in 1976 
the Master of Business Administration degree. 

The objective of the programs for the degree, Master of Education, is to 
improve subject matter profiency and develop mature, professional teachers. The 
objective of the Master of Arts program is to advance the student's scholarship in 
an academic discipline. Programs leading to the Master of Science degree are 
designed to develop mature scholarship and competence, especially as they are re- 
lated to application. The object of the Master of Business Administration degree 
is to provide increased knowledge and skills essential for quality performance in 
the business professions. 

The College pledges itself to a continuous review of the needs for graduate 
education in the geographic region it serves. 

11.2 SCHEDULES OF CLASSES 

Graduate classes taught in the regular academic year are usually scheduled 
in late afternoons, evenings and Saturdays in order to provide opportunity for 
teachers and individuals engaged in other full-time occupations to further their 
education. Graduate courses are offered for full-time students in the summer 
terms. 



11.3 GRADUATE CATALOGUE 

A graduate catalogue with comprehensive descriptions of courses, programs 
and regulations is published annually. Requests for copies should be addressed to 
the Dean of Graduate Studies. 



:io im.ix 



IM)f\ 



Academic Advisement 


57 


Campus Maintenance Building 




Academic Dismissal 


63 


5T Development 


50 


Academic Probation 


63 


Carver Hall 


36 


Academic Review Board 


64 


Centennial (ivmnasium 




Accreditation, General 


34 


Center for Academic Development 


54 


Accreditation. Ieacher Ed. 


170 


Cheating and Plagiarism 


65 


Administration 


7 


Chemistrv 


83 


Admission Criteria 


53 


Chemistrv BA MBA Option 


14 


Admission. Non-degree 


205 


Chemistry. Secondary Ed. 


195 


Admission Procedures 


53 


Choice of Curnculum 


67 


Advanced Placement 


56 


Class Standing 


60 


Advanced Standing for Militarv Service 


56 


Clinics 


50, 203 


Allied Health Sciences 


172 


Coaching. Secondary Ed. 


175 


American Studies 


73 


College Services. Personnel 


30 


Ambulance Service 


49 


College Store 


36. 50 


Andruss Library 


36 


College Union 


36.48 


Appeals for Reinstatement 


64 


Commons, Dining 


36. 48 


Application for Admission 


53 


Communications Disorders 


175 


Art 


73 


Communications, Sec. Ed. 


196 


Art Gallerv 


50 


Community Government Association 


45 


Arts and Sciences 


69 


Computer and Information Science 


86 


Art Collection 


50 


Computer Services 


37 


Arts Council 


50 


Comprehensive Social Studies. 




Athletics 


51 


Secondary Education 


197 


Attendance 


61 


Cooperative Education 


207 


Attendance Fee Program 


205 


Correspondence. Instructions for 




Auditing of Courses 


60 


Counseling 


49 


Auditorium 


36 


Course Load 


99 


Automobile Registration 


52 


Courses, Repeating of 


59 


Bachelor of Arts, Majors 




Credit by Examination 


59 


(See Disciplines) 




Credit, Definition of 


67 


Bakeless Center for the Humanities 


34 


Credit Transfer. 1 imitations 


64 


Banking, Student 


49 


Dental Hygiene 


173 


Benjamin Franklin Hall 


35 


Dining Commons 




Biology and Allied Health Sciences 


H 


Dismissal Academic 




Biolog>. Secondary Ed. 


195 


Dismissal Appeals 


64 


Bloomsburg Foundation 


37 


Earl) Admission 


54 


Bloomsburg l ocation and Description 


33 


Earlv Childhood 




Books and Supplies 


42 


and Elementary Education 


179 


Buckalcu House 


36 


Earth Science and Geologv 


110 


Buildings and Facilities 


34 


Earth and Space Science. 




Business. Accounting 


159 


Doodarj Education 


196 


Business Administration 


ISA 


l conomici 


87 


Business I ducation 


165 


Educational Studies and Services 


184 


Business Education, Certification 


165 


Hcmcniarv 1 ducation 




Business. Inlormation Processing 


161 


1 nglish 


90 


Business. General 


159 


I nglish. Secondary ' d 


196 


Business. Management 


162 


\ ntrancc tests 


$3 


Business. Marketing 




Evaluation Criteria 




Business. Office Administration 


166 


1 Mended Programs, School o\ 




Business. Secretarial 


166 


\ acultv 


10 


Calendar 


4.5 


lees. Advance Pavment 


41 


Campus Visits 


54 


1 ees. Application 


41 


Campus \ oice 


47 


\ ees. Basic 


39 







I\di \ 


; 211 


Fees, Building 


41 


Meals 


40 


Fees, Community Activities 


39 


Medical Technology 


172 


Fees, Diploma 


41 


Mid- lorn Grades 


61 


Fees, Graduate Student 


39 


Minimal Progress 


63 


Fees, Housing 


40 


Mini-Courses 205, 


206 


Fees, Late Registration 


41 


Music 


129 


Fees, Out-of-State Students 


39 


Natural Sciences Mathematics 


70 


Fees, Part-Time Students 


39 


Navy Hall 


35 


Fees, Payment of 


40 


Nelson Gymnasium and Field House 


35 


Fees, Summer Session 


39 


Non-credit Courses 67, 


205 


Fees, Transcript 


40 


Non-degree Programs 


205 


Financial Aid 


43 


Nursing 


190 


Foreign Languages 


97 


Obiter 


47 


Fraternities, Honorary 


47 


Olympian 


47 


Fraternities, Professional 


47 


Organization of the College 


33 


Fraternities, Service 


48~ 


Parking Garage 


36 


Fraternities, Social 


49 


Part-time Student, Definition 


61 


French 


97 


Pass-Fail 


59 


French, Secondary Ed. 


196 


Pennsylvania Department of Education 


3 


Full-Time Student, Definition 


61 


Philosophy and Anthropology 


134 


General Education Requirements 


67 


Physics 


138 


General Sciences, Secondary Ed. 


197 


Physics, Secondary Ed. 


197 


Geography and Earth Sciences 


107 


Pilot 


47 


German 


100 


Placement Office 


50 


German, Secondary Ed. 


197 


Polish 


106 


Good Standing 


63 


Political Science 


141 


Grades, Change of 


62 


Post Office 


50 


Grades, Definition 


61 


Pre-Professional Study and Advisement 


71 


Graduate Courses in Senior Year 


65 


Programs Abroad 




Graduate Study 


209 


(See Foreign Languages) 




Graduation Requirements 


66 


Progress Report 


61 


Haas Center for Arts 


36 


Psychology 


145 


Health and Physical Education 


113 


Public School Nursing 


197 


Health Center 


48 


Publications 


46 


Health Record 


55 


Quality Point Average, Definition 


62 


History 


117 


Quality Points 


62 


History of the College 


33 


QUEST 


51 


Honors 


63 


Reading Clinic 


203 


Housing 


44 


Readmission of Former Students 


55 


Humanities 


69 


Recreation 


51 


Insurance, Athletic 


49 


Recreation Areas 


37 


Inter-Disciplinary Studies 


123 


Redman Stadium 


37 


International Education 


52, 207 


Refunds 


41 


International Studies 


62 


Registration Policies 


57 


Intramurals 


51 


Repeating Courses 


59 


Italian 


105 


Representative Assembly 


52 


Journalism 


90 


Reinstatement 


64 


Kehr Union 


36,48 


Residence Requirement 


65 


Latin 


106 


Residence Halls 


35 


Learning and Communication 




Retention Policies 


63 


Disorders Center 


216 


ROTC Air Force 


185 


Leave of Absence 


55 


ROTC, Army 


188 


Library 


36 


Russian 


105 


Litwhilen Field 


37 


Schedule Change 


58 


Marine Science Consortium 


112 


Scheduling 


57 


Mathematics 


125 


School of Arts and Sciences 


69 


Mathematics, Secondary Ed. 


197 


School of Business 


157 



212 Im>»\ 



School ol Extended Programs 


205 


School ol Prolcssional Studies 


169 


Science Hall 


35 


Scranton Common 36, 4x 


nd Baccalaureate Degree 


66 


Secondar) Education 


195 


Seconder) 1 d . Areas ol Specialization 


195 


Semester Hour. Definition 


67 


Services 


48 


Social Sciences 


70 


Sociology and Social Welfare 


148 


Sororities. Social 


47 


Sororities. Service 


48 


Spanish 


100 


Spanish. Secondary Ed. 


198 


Special Education 


200 


Speech, Mass Communication, 




and Theater 


152 


State Colleges and University Directors 


3 


Student Insurance 


49 


Student Life and Services 


43 


Student Organizations 


46 


Student Publications 


46 


Student Responsibility 


57 



Student Teaching 
Student I'nion 
Student College Policv 

Student Financial Aid 

Student Grievance Policy 
Sutliff 



Admission to 

Certification 

Degrees 

Field Experience 

Retention 

Student Teacher 



Teacher Ed. 

Teacher Ed. 

Teacher Ed. 

Teach. 

Teacher Ed. 

Teacher Ed. 

Testing Programs 

Theatre Arts 

Today Publication 

Transfer Credit Evaluation 

Transfer of Curriculum 

Transfer Student, Admission of 

Trustees 

Veterans 

Waller Administration Building 

Withdrawal, From College 

Withdrawal. From Course 



171 
36,48 

52 

35 

171 

170 

169 

171 

171 

171 

65 

154 

47 

64 

58 

M 

6 

51 

58 
58 



KEY TO CAMPl S GUIDE APPEARING ON OPPOSITE PAGE 



1. Carver Hall 

2. Schuylkill Residence Hall 

3. Heating Plant 

4 Scranton Commons 

5. Kehr College Union 

6. Lycoming Residence Hall 

7. Elwell Residence Hall 

8. College Store 

9. Luzerne Residence Hall 

10. Montour Residence Hall 

1 1. Maintenance Building 

12 I aundry 

trthumberland 

Residence Hall 

14 Benjamin Franklin Hall 

15 Nav) Hall 

16 ( olumhi.i Residence Hall 
I 7 Haai (enter tor the Arts 



18. Bakeless Center 

for the Humanities 

19. Andruss 1 ihrarv 

20. Hartline Science Center 
21 Sutliff Hall 

lennial Gv mnasium 
23, President's Residence 
24 Campus Maintenance Center 
25. Human Services Center (Proposed) 
2o Old Science Hall 
2^ Waller Administration Building 

cola 
29 Multi-level Parking 

•hall field 

31 lennis Courts 

32 Practice field 

13 Department oi Nursing 




i